Download Honeymoon in Hell fb2

by Fredric Brown
Download Honeymoon in Hell fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Fredric Brown
  • ISBN:
    0553207520
  • ISBN13:
    978-0553207521
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bantam Books; Reprint edition (1982)
  • Pages:
    150 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1682 kb
  • ePUB format
    1707 kb
  • DJVU format
    1463 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    330
  • Formats:
    lrf doc lit azw


HONEYMOON IN HELL appeared in the second issue of GALAXY dated November 1950. Brown's THE LAST MARTIAN had appeared in the first issue a month previous

HONEYMOON IN HELL appeared in the second issue of GALAXY dated November 1950. Brown's THE LAST MARTIAN had appeared in the first issue a month previous.

Fredric Brown (1906-1972) was the only writer to achieve equal prominence in the mystery and science fiction genres. His first foray into mystery, The Fabulous Clipjoint, won the Mystery Writers of America's Edgar Award for Best First Novel. The rest of the brief page count is padded out by boilerplate common to every (Galaxy Project) publication - how important GALAXY MAGAZINE was in the 1950s, how important the length of the book's single story is, and how important the artist (whose cover image has nothing to do with the story) is. (Such attention to detail!

Fredric Brown (1906-1972) was the only writer to achieve equal prominence in the mystery and science fiction genres. (Such attention to detail!

Honeymoon in Hell book.

Honeymoon in Hell book. Appearing in the second issue of Galaxy dated November 1950, Honeymoon in Hell showcased the magazine’s distinctive identity as opposed to other publications of its time-darker, more socially aware, sometimes sexually frank in ways that were shocking A groundbreaking science fiction novelette from the early days of Galaxy magazine-plus a new foreword by Paul Di Filippo.

Brown's "Honeymoon in Hell" was the cover story in the second issue of. .

Brown's "Honeymoon in Hell" was the cover story in the second issue of Galaxy Science Fiction in 1950. Death and Nine Lives. In the final volume, McMillan discussed Fredric Brown material that was still uncollected, with particular reference to a column that Brown wrote from 1937 to 1946 called The Proofreader's Page, mentioning that these would "take a book in themselves". Twenty years later that book was published, including both the columns and a selection of other uncollected fiction, poetry and non-fiction as: The Proofreaders' Page and Other Uncollected Items (2011), ISBN 978-1-105-03045-1, published by Galactic Central Publications.

Fredric Brown (October 29, 1906 – March 11, 1972) was an American science fiction and mystery writer. He is known for his use of humor and for his mastery of the "short short" form-stories of 1 to 3 pages, often with ingenious plotting devices and surprise endings. Humor and a somewhat postmodern outlook carried over into his novels as well.

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This book includes both the landmark novelette and a new foreword by Paul Di.

Appearing in the second issue of Galaxy dated November 1950, Honeymoon in Hell showcased the magazine’s distinctive identity as opposed to other publications of its time-darker, more socially aware, sometimes sexually frank in ways that were shocking for the er. This book includes both the landmark novelette and a new foreword by Paul Di Filippo. Initial selections include work by Ray Bradbury, Fredric Brown, Lester del Rey, Robert A. Heinlein, Damon Knight, C. M. Kornbluth, Walter M. Miller, J. Frederik Pohl, Robert Sheckley, Robert Silverberg, William Tenn (Philip Klass), and Kurt Vonnegut.

You’ll find yoursel. et’s se. pending your honeymoon in Miami. At that exact moment, you’ll be in a taxicab en route-. Yes, but- Charlie gulped.

Yes? prompted the Head Compositor. You’ll find yoursel. But what? The Head Compositor looked surprised. I certainly thought that was what you wanted, Wills. We owe you a big favor for having used such ingenuity in calling those typographical errors to our attention, but I thought that being married to Jane was what you wanted, and if you go back and find yourself-.

Short story collection.

Xor
Fredric Brown wrote excellent mystery novels (try Night of the Jabberwock, for example), a few good horror stories (the title story in the collection Come And Go Mad and Other Stories is a classic), and a lot of science fiction, a field in which he specialized in what we today call "Flash Fiction"-- very short stories with surprising, often funny endings (several of these are available as free Kindle downloads). This novelette, unfortunately, is not his best. The emphasis on sex was very daring for the 1950s (nothing remotely explicit, mind you, but simply having a story whose plot turns on human reproduction was highly unusual in the SF magazines of the era), and the idea of an external crisis bringing the warring nations of the earth together was still a rather new one then, but today the story seems rather tame, and the surprises are dulled by the fact that many subsequent stories have used similar plot points.

I should emphasize that this is just a novelette (and not even a particularly long one), not a full novel. "The Galaxy Project" is reprinting novelettes and novellas which originally appeared in Galaxy in the 1950s as e-books, padding them with essays on Galaxy, on the story, on the artist who painted the cover, etc. Some of the stories in this series are first rate (Heinlein's The Year of the Jackpot (The Galaxy Project), for example), but this one is not (IMHO, of course).
Kearanny
The eBook I purchased is the one that only contains the single story (as other reviewers indicated there is another version of this). It's a simple plot. The world's birth rate goes from 50/50 female/male to 100% female. The government thinks some type of radio wave is screwing up the reproductive process. A man from the US and a woman from the USSR are married and sent to the moon together. Their mission: Anna to get pregnant and return to Earth. If the baby is born male, they know the problem is strictly terrestrial. Then the story proceeds through a few plot twists.

The writing is solid, though there is a lot of exposition at the end like a detective explaining a mystery to the audience. Most of the plot twists come out of nowhere, as if the author thought, "What cool thing could I make happen next?" The final page or two is a bit sappy. None of these are really big deals.

I applaud the author's use of science to explain the fiction. If there are problems with the science, you have to keep in mind it was written in 1950. There is scientific reasoning behind age restrictions on astronauts and the elaborate supply management system for surviving on and returning from the moon. There are politic elements that mostly remain as background filler. Carmody is clear about his avoidance of the topic at all costs with his Russian bride, Anna. While there are political motivations at the heart of the story, it's never shoved into the reader's face.

I can't help but wonder if this story influenced the ending of the graphic novel, the Watchmen.
Arador
The cultural era of the time when it was written is obvious but the ending redeems itself and the overall premise was not necessarily unique to me (though I don't know my timelines it may have been more so at the time) it was still a fun read.
Rexfire
I remember reading material like this and the Heinlein juvenile, or rather young adult, fiction. Nostalgia and a wish for peace met in my heart. I really, truly enjoyed it. Of course I am in my eighth decade and read Nightmares and Geezenstacks when I was in high school. Loved it then. Love it now. Very glad for the Kindle editions as my copy is ancient.
Wymefw
The other reviews of HONEYMOON IN HELL, appended close-by, refer to an old beloved and long-out-of-print Bantam paperback, containing many noted Fredric Brown sf stories, first issued when Rod Serling helmed Twilight Zone -- the first time around.

This (Galaxy Project) edition of "Honeymoon in Hell" contains only that single Brown novelette. The rest of the brief page count is padded out by boilerplate common to every (Galaxy Project) publication -- how important GALAXY MAGAZINE was in the 1950s, how important the length of the book's single story is, and how important the artist (whose cover image has nothing to do with the story) is. (Such attention to detail!: Despite this edition's Fredric Brown bio, his 1947 first mystery novel was THE FABULOUS CLIPJOINT, not 1950's NIGHT OF THE JABBERWOCK.)

Unique to each (Galaxy Project) is a context-setting introduction by a noted writer/critic of the field to the contained story. "Honeymoon in Hell" has a nice one by Paul Di Filippo.

Be Aware, for the price quoted, you're basically getting only the title novelette and an introduction to it, not the old HONEYMOON IN HELL, with multiple stories, referenced by other reviewers.

My stars are for the story, not for its packaging and presentation.
Anen
Honeymoon in Hell is a product of its time, a time in which people believed the end of the world was near. And several stores were written around this subject. This is one of them and its end is surprising. The author is really a master of short stories.
Mitars Riders
Bought this for light reading and it has been great for that. My kindle is with me when ever I am out and about at hockey and basketball games with my wife so I can read between when play is happening on the ice or court. This is great for that time frame.
I'm a longtime fan of Brown, the legendary creator of the world's shortest novel (look it up). I loved his sci-fi stories. "What Mad Universe?" and "Honeymoon in Hell" were two of my favorites. Re-reading this Galaxy Project edition of "Honeymoon in Hell" was great fun.