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by Charles W. Royster,James O'Neill
Download Garrison Tales from Tonquin: An American's Stories of the French Foreign Legion in Vietnam in the 1890s fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Charles W. Royster,James O'Neill
  • ISBN:
    0807131806
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807131800
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    LSU Press (October 1, 2006)
  • Pages:
    184 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1144 kb
  • ePUB format
    1521 kb
  • DJVU format
    1510 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    389
  • Formats:
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Garrison Tales from Tonquin book Royster has also unearthed and included two essays O'Neill published in magazines of the time, one a description of a Buddhist temple.

Garrison Tales from Tonquin book. In 1890, deployed to Tonquin in French Indochina (more familiar today as Tonkin, Vietnam), O'Neill faced tropical heat, infectious disease, and sudden death. Royster has also unearthed and included two essays O'Neill published in magazines of the time, one a description of a Buddhist temple in Hanoi and the other an appreciation of the Hungarian novelist Maurus J�kai. Whether read for historical value, literary merit, or political insights, Garrison Tales from Tonquin is a true discovery.

James O'Neill James O'Neill was born in Connecticut in 1860 to a working-class family. He returned to Europe in 1887 and enlisted in the French Foreign Legion.

Garrison Tales from Tonquin: An American's Stories of the French Foreign Legion in Vietnam in the 1890s. James O'Neill was born in Connecticut in 1860 to a working-class family. During the 1870s he and his sister gained the attention of a priest affiliated with the Anglo-Catholic Cowley Fathers, who had set up a mission, based first in Bridgeport and then in Boston. His regiment was based in Algeria, but a detachment of 300, including O'Neill, sailed for Tonkin in 1890.

ISBN 978-0-8071-3180-0.

He was born in Nashville, Tennessee on November 27, 1944, the only son of Ferd Neuman Royster of Robards, Kentucky, a United Methodist minister, and Laura Jean (Smotherman) Royster of Carthage, Tennessee, an elementary school teacher (both now deceased). Garrison tales from Tonquin: an American's stories of the French Foreign Legion in Vietnam in the 1890s. ISBN 978-0-8071-3180-0.

Outside their fantasies, though, few Americans ever joined th. .It is, therefore, a surprise to discover these extraordinary short stories, written by a legionnaire who was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. James O'Neill enlisted in the legion in 1887, at the age of twenty-seven. He found himself, in 1890, deployed to Tonquin in French Indochina, more familiar today as Tonkin, Vietnam.

Garrison Tales from Tonquin. Select Format: Hardcover.

2 results for neill-hardcover". Garrison Tales from Tonquin. by James O'Neill 10 September 2010.

000 Appendix The Great Buddha 000 Maurus J¢kai 000.

Garrison Tales From Tonquin by James O'Neill, October 2006, Louisiana State University Press . An American's Stories of the French Foreign Legion in Vietnam in the 1890s. There's no description for this book yet.

An American's Stories of the French Foreign Legion in Vietnam in the 1890s. Published October 2006 by Louisiana State University Press. World Heritage Encyclopedia is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.

Items related to Garrison Tales from Tonquin: An American's Stories. A prodigiously diversified writer, Robert Penn Warren was the first poet laureate of the United States and twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. Robert Penn Warren Garrison Tales from Tonquin: An American's Stories of the French Foreign Legion in Vietnam in the 1890s. ISBN 13: 9780807126769. He is the author of fifteen volumes of poetry and ten novels, including All the King's Men, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Warren was born in Guthrie, Kentucky, in 1905 and died in Stratton, Vermont, in 1989.

The thought of enlisting in the French Foreign Legion held a tantalizing allure for young nineteenth-century American boys in search of adventure. Apart from youthful fantasies few Americans seriously pursued joining the legion. These surprising and extraordinary short stories, written by one young man who did, take us to that time and place. Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, James O'Neill enlisted in the legion in 1887, at the age of twenty-seven. In 1890, deployed to Tonquin in French Indochina (more familiar today as Tonkin, Vietnam), O'Neill faced tropical heat, infectious disease, and sudden death. Like his contemporary Stephen Crane, O'Neill's ability to tell an engaging story and his keen sense for telling details provide a unique record of his time in this exotic world. In these thirteen "tales," O'Neill shows -- with surprising subtlety -- that France's efforts to conquer and govern Indochina were foolhardy. Although the only American in his stories is the narrator, it is clear that the tales are aimed at readers in the United States and are intended to caution against the construction of empires abroad. Far from polemical tirades, these are absorbing, unadorned stories -- remarkably contemporary in both style and substance.Charles Royster provides a short biography of O'Neill, who seems to have vanished into obscurity a few years after these stories were first published in 1895. Royster has also unearthed and included two essays O'Neill published in magazines of the time, one a description of a Buddhist temple in Hanoi and the other an appreciation of the Hungarian novelist Maurus Jókai. Whether read for historical value, literary merit, or political insights, Garrison Tales from Tonquin is a true discovery.


Debeme
This book is a collection of tales loosely modeled on the author's experiences in Tonkin in the 1890's. If you are looking for a factual recollection of his service in the Foreign Legion, this is not going to help you. Still, his perspective is worth noting and the tales are interesting and fairly brief- about five pages each. In each tale, the author explores a different concept that ties into his time there.
Dondallon
Interesting work.
Hanelynai
We should thank Charles Royster for making these stories available again. James O'Neill was an American who served in the French Foreign Legion in the late-1880s and 1890s. He was a soldier of fortune minus the fortune. The French Foreign Legion paid its men about a penny a day, Royster tells us in his informative and well-researched introduction, even though a U.S. army enlistee got 25 cents a day. Men didn't serve in the Foreign Legion for the money, but adventure and travel. What many of them got, however, was an early death--either through contracting a deadly disease or in battle with the Annamites (Vietnamese), who resisted French occupation. O'Neill published his Tales in 1895. He didn't sell many copies, but his stories, much as Graham Greene's The Quiet American would, foreshadowed the fatal problems the French (not to mention the Americans) faced in Vietnam. Compounding the military problems were the cultural differences between East and West. O'Neill's Western characters--Americans, Frenchmen, and Germans among them--do not fare well in the jungle around Tonquin, whether they try to "go native" or not.

The Annamites are not called the Vietnamese in this book, nor the land called Vietnam, but the people and the locations are familiar to anyone who has read about Vietnam, or simply watched Apocalypse Now. O'Neill's stories could have been written in 1970, which makes them prophetic and chilling. We are given brief, disturbing tales of madness, suicide, disease, and death. O'Neill's tales are similar to Francis Ford Coppola's vision of Vietnam circa the late-70s. When Captain Willard enters Kurz's lair in Apocalypse Now, he says it was place of malaria and nightmares. O'Neill knew such places well. One story (which, again, made me think of Apocalypse Now), has a killer tiger attacking the unfortunate locals.

This book, though a bit expensive considering its brief length, should prove of interest to students of history as well as American literature. In contrast to some of his contemporaries, O'Neill's prose is free of Victorian ornament. He reads like a young Hemingway. He doesn't romanticize Vietnam, and his style is stripped down and straight forward. These stories show that Americans did not wait until the 1950s before they got involved in Vietnam. There was a fascination with the region long before.