» » Servants of the Map: Stories

Download Servants of the Map: Stories fb2

by Andrea Barrett
Download Servants of the Map: Stories fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Andrea Barrett
  • ISBN:
    0393043487
  • ISBN13:
    978-0393043488
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    W W Norton & Co Inc; 1 edition (February 2002)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1244 kb
  • ePUB format
    1751 kb
  • DJVU format
    1248 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    839
  • Formats:
    docx azw lrf lrf


The first story, Servants of the Map, is about a Civil Junior Sub Assistant in the Himalayan Service during the early .

Summary: Barretts' phenomenally written short stories will leave you wanting more, which, fortunately, there is. The family tree at the back of TAWB entitled "The Families" is indispensable in keeping track of the characters in this and the other books.

A more reliable comfort is his box of books. In it, beyond the mathematical and cartographical texts he needs for his work, are three other gifts.

Servants of the Map. The Forest. A more reliable comfort is his box of books. This Max cherishes for the thought behind it, never correcting her misapprehension that Sikkim, where Hooker traveled in 1848, is only a stone’s throw from where Max is traveling now.

Servants of the Map book. I discovered Andrea Barrett through Ship Fever: Stories, a collection of stories which won the National Book Award in 1996. New York: . Andrea Barrett is the author of The Air We Breathe, Servants of the Map (finalist for the Pulitzer Prize), The Voyage of the Narwhal, Ship Fever (winner of the National Book Award), and other books. Servants of the Map" Max Vigne is an English Civil Junior Sub-Assistant surveyor in the Himalayas away from his wife and young. She teaches at Williams College and lives in northwestern Massachusetts.

I discovered Andrea Barrett when I read Voyage of the Narwhal, an epic story of courage, devotion, and the . Spanning 200 years, the stories of Servants of the Map, address issues of personal discovery against a backdrop of the scientific and natural world.

I discovered Andrea Barrett when I read Voyage of the Narwhal, an epic story of courage, devotion, and the struggle with the northern latitudes that captured so many imaginations during the 19th century. I enjoyed that book tremendously. I wasn't disappointed in this collection of short stories. Andrea Barrett has a great ability when it comes to developing characters. Barrett is strongest with her historical settings, where time moves more slowly and there is more solitary introspection.

February 1, 2002 on back cover

February 1, 2002 on back cover. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

Andrea Barrett Servants of the Map. That terrible story had set off others; the night had been like a night in hell . The stories he wrote to Clara were the least of what happened that afternoon. Dr. Chouteau had been everywhere, Max learned. Without a map; maps meant nothing to him. That terrible story had set off others; the night had been like a night in hell; Max had fled the campfire soon after Archdale’s tirade and rolled himself in a blanket in a hollow, far from everyone, carved into the rocky cliffs. When he woke he’d been surprised not to find the campground littered with bodies.

The Overstory, by Richard Powers (. An ingeniously structured narrative that branches and canopies like the trees at the core of the story whose wonder and connectivity echo those of the humans living amongst them. Less, by Andrew Sean Greer (Lee Boudreaux Books/Little, Brown and Company). A generous book, musical in its prose and expansive in its structure and range, about growing older and the essential nature of love. The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday)

Andrea Barrett (born November 16, 1954) is an American novelist and short story writer. Her collection Ship Fever won the 1996 . National Book Award for Fiction, and she received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2001

Andrea Barrett (born November 16, 1954) is an American novelist and short story writer. National Book Award for Fiction, and she received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2001. Her book Servants of the Map was a finalist for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and Archangel was a finalist for the 2013 Story Prize. Barrett was born in Boston, Massachusetts. in biology from Union College and briefly attended a P.

He hears tales of other travelers as well - Jacquemont and Moorcroft, the Schlagintweit brothers, Thomas Thomson, and the Baron von Hugel. As winter turns into early spring, as he does what he can with his map of the valley and, in response to letters from Dehra Dun, begins preparations for another season up in the mountains, his life spirals within him like the tendril of a climbing plant.

Spanning two centuries, an intricately woven collection of stories and novellas journey across landscapes of yearning, awakening, loss, and unexpected discovery, as a mapper of the highest mountain peaks discovers his true calling, a young woman must come to terms with a romantic fantasy, and the lives of many other extraordinary characters unfold in a borderland between science and passion.

Zahisan
This author is very good and I enjoyed this collection of stories. I have enjoyed her novels even more.
Kajishakar
I loved the writing style and subjects. If you are interested in the history of natural sciences you will love it.
Ventelone
As described, arrived quickly, love the paperback format. I like historical fiction and this fits the bill. It is perfect.
Rias
Title story draws you into a man's mind, closely observed, fully appreciated, but from a distinctly female perspective. Infinite compassion, a surprise.
Chuynopana
Arrived in timely manner, as described.
Frostdefender
This collection of six stories kept my attention throughout, although I generally don’t like short stories at all. It helped that her characters had a scientific bent: a surveyor and amateur botanist, a retired physical chemist, a biochemistry post-doc, a fossil collector. I appreciated that the science was accurate, so far as I could tell, and simply a matter-of-fact element of who these people were.

Ms. Barrett’s settings range from Eastern Pennsylvania in 1810 to the Himalayas during Victoria’s reign to the modern East Coast. Connection is a theme of the story collection as a whole. Two young women dream of reuniting with long-lost brothers. Two sets of sisters struggle with their differences. Two girlhood crushes founder on the rocks of reality. Names and objects from one story pop up in another.

I still don’t know why I happened to buy this book at a library used book sale, but I’m very glad I did.
Zodama
This is a special book of six short stories (with one of them approaching novella-hood). The stories all feature people engaged in the pursuit of science in one form or another, including a surveyor and botanist in the Himalayas, a physical-chemist turned theoretical structural-biologist, amateur paleontologists, an entomologist, and a molecular biologist. But science does not dominate the narratives; rather, the stories are tales of the human heart and of finding a place in the world. In the end, the reader does not think of the characters as scientists but rather as humans, people with everyday human needs and concerns. For a non-scientist reader such as myself, to so convincingly convey the humanity of her characters is quite an accomplishment by Andrea Barrett (whose college training was as a biologist).

The first story, which also is the title story, is relatively focused in time: 1863 and 1864, when its central character Max Vigne is a lowly surveyor with lofty dreams participating in the Kashmir Series of the Grand Trigonometrical Survey of India, an integral component of "The Great Game". The other stories all encompass broader swaths of time, going back decades or even generations from the year the principal action is set (1979, 1910, 1853, 1986, and 1905). Further extending their arc, and thereby imparting a sense of the sweep of an epic, the stories are linked by the family trees of one or more of their characters. For example, Max Vigne's daughter is one of two central characters in "The Cure", set in 1905 in a village in the Northern Adirondacks that caters to tubercular patients, and two of his great-great-granddaughters is each a central figure in two other stories.

Moreover, the interrelationships among characters extend back to two of Barrett's previous works -- "The Shipping News" (which won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1996 and which I also thought to be a special book) and "The Voyage of the Narwahl" (which I look forward to soon reading). Nonetheless, despite the subtle links among them, the six stories can each stand alone as a self-contained story. And marvelously rich and compact tales they are, ones that in the hands of less accomplished authors would end up as three-hundred page novels. SERVANTS OF THE MAP is a treasure.
If you plan to read only one book by Andrea Barrett, let it be this one. Most of the main characters in these stories are related by blood or marriage to those in some of her other works: The Air We Breathe "TAWB" (read it first if you think you might have time for more), Ship Fever, and Voyage of the Narwhal. The first story, Servants of the Map, is about a Civil Junior Sub Assistant in the Himalayan Service during the early 1860s, and is told primarily in the form of letters from Max Vigne, born in 1835, to his wife, with whom he shares his experiences in the Himalayas: surveying, mapping, collecting and writing about the local fauna, and dealing with some pretty colorful fellow HS workers. Some of his descendants show up in TAWB as well as in the last story of this collection, The Cure, about the life of homeopath Nora Kynd, born in 1825 (who appears in Ship Fever and TAWB), another Kynd family member, and Max Vigne's wife and children.

Both The Forest and The Mysteries of Ubiquitin are about the Marburg sisters, born in the mid-1950s, whose father, Leo, is a major character in TAWB. The setting of The Forest is a party, during which the younger, less successful sister prodigy finds herself stuck with an elderly, visiting professor. He suffers a mishap when, on a whim, she takes him on a little adventure. In The Mysteries of Ubiquitin, she appears again, this time as a successful, thirty-year-old biochemist en route to an enzymology meeting who encounters the man who, years earlier during her childhood and his young adulthood, was her first crush. A relationship ensues during which she learns more than she wanted to about certain relatives.

Theories of Rain and Two Rivers are also related. The first concerns a girl, Lavinia, born in 1790, who spends a lot of time thinking about her long lost brother, who she has not seen since she was a child. The siblings become separated when she is spirited away by two "aunts" after disease decimates her family, orphaning the two. She is infatuated by a neighbor, but is courted by another. Two Rivers follows her brother, Caleb, born in 1788, who is taken in by a theology teacher with an interest in paleontology. He becomes a schoolteacher, and meets an intriguing young woman on a solitary paleontology expedition.

Summary: Barretts' phenomenally written short stories will leave you wanting more, which, fortunately, there is. The family tree at the back of TAWB entitled "The Families" is indispensable in keeping track of the characters in this and the other books. These stories deserve at least four stars as a stand-alone book, five stars in combination with The Air We Breathe and Ship Fever.