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by John Barth
Download The Development: Nine Stories fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    John Barth
  • ISBN:
    0547072481
  • ISBN13:
    978-0547072487
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First edition (October 7, 2008)
  • Pages:
    167 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1662 kb
  • ePUB format
    1639 kb
  • DJVU format
    1831 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    411
  • Formats:
    lit mobi docx doc


The development : nine stories, John Barth.

The development : nine stories, John Barth. p. cm. ISBN 978-0-547-07248-7.

Nothing human has ever been alien to Barth, and this now includes the somewhat decelerated doings and autumnal preoccupations of the moderately well-off in their retirement. If those doings are not for the most part the stuff of high drama - the discovery of a neighborhood Peeping Tom, the staging of a toga party - the preoccupations are universal. Heron Bay dwellers contend with fear, desire, loss, betrayal and the near-presence of death.

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The Development John Barth. Download 18. 9 Kb. bet. 1/8. Sana. For information about permission to reproduce selections. from this book, write to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10003. The development : nine stories, John Barth.

John Simmons Barth (/bɑːrθ/; born May 27, 1930) is an American writer who is best known for his postmodernist and metafictional fiction. John Barth, called "Jack", was born in Cambridge, Maryland. He has an older brother, Bill, and a twin sister Jill. In 1947 he graduated from Cambridge High School, where he played drums and wrote for the school newspaper.

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The Development book. John Barth has certainly softened up in his (currently) penultimate work of fiction, The Development, a collection of nine shorts about geezers. From one of our most celebrated masters, a touching, comic, deeply. Cardboard? Objection noted. There’s Barth (still) in here {story: The Bard shall not be bypassed; you Writing Workshop nerds, es. need this one as do you perhaps who’ve read that thing I’ve heard about? Westward the SomethingSomething ?} What does an Old-Fart-Emeritus Postmodernist write?

John Barth’s fiction has won the National Book Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, and the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award. For many years he taught in the writing seminars at John Hopkins University

John Barth’s fiction has won the National Book Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, and the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award. For many years he taught in the writing seminars at John Hopkins University. Barth is the author of such seminal works as The Sot-Weed Factor, Chimera (for which he won the NBA), and Giles Goat-Boy.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Development: Nine Stories. As in a Mirror: John Calvin and Karl Barth On Knowing God (Studies in the History of Christian Traditions). Cornelis Van Der Kooi.

John Barth is the author of numerous works of fiction, including The Sot-Weed Factor, The Tidewater Tales, Lost in the Funhouse, The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor, the National Book Award winner Chimera, and most recently The Book of Ten Nights and a Night

John Barth is the author of numerous works of fiction, including The Sot-Weed Factor, The Tidewater Tales, Lost in the Funhouse, The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor, the National Book Award winner Chimera, and most recently The Book of Ten Nights and a Night. He taught for many years in the writing program at Johns Hopkins University. Teller, tale, torrid. inspiration: Barth's seventeenth book brings these three narrative 'roads' together inimitably, and thrice.

From one of our most celebrated masters, a touching, comic, deeply humane collection of linked stories about surprising developments in a gated communityI find myself inclined to set down for whomever, before my memory goes kaput altogether, some account of our little community, in particular of what Margie and I consider to have been its most interesting hour: the summer of the Peeping Tom. Something has disturbed the comfortably retired denizens of a pristine Florida-style gated community in Chesapeake Bay country. In the dawn of the new millennium and the evening of their lives, these empty nesters discover that their tidy enclave can be as colorful, shocking, and surreal as any of John Barths fictional locales. From the high jinks of a toga party to marital infidelities, a baffling suicide pact, and the sudden, apocalyptic destruction of the short-lived development, Barth brings mordant humor and compassion to the lives of characters we all know well. From one of the most prodigally gifted comic novelists writing in English today (Newsweek), The Development is John Barth at his most accessible and sympathetic best.

Endieyab
John Barth's The Development brings together a number of stories in a manner reminiscent of Sherwood Anderson's Winesboro, Ohio, Boccaccio's Decameron, and Melville's Moby Dick. All stories include a setting, but some fictions bind character and place more tightly than others. Place in this book is Heron Bay Estates a community more ill-at-ease than Shanghai-La. One other comparison comes to mind: the survivalist communities of the 1960's fortifying themselves in preparation for the advent of an atomic Apocalypse.
The "voice" of the narrator might be termed first person omniscient, the stories usually starting off with the first person "I" then ranging about other character's doings with a scope beyond realistic limitations. For me it had charm as if I had fallen into the company of a raconteur affable and erudite. Mr. Barth is ranked among the metafictionists, writers who treat fictional composition as a wizardry. In the stories, to one degree or another, the narrator comments on the preparation of what has been or will be read. An ancestor of this approach is Luis Borges whom Mr. Barth mentions in a Paris Review interview as an influence on him..
The stories read easily enough. They have the virtue of arousing interest, intellectual if not emotional, but I might be too severe. Henry James said that the only quality a reader can demand of a fictional piece is that it be interesting . Every thing else is at the discretion of the writer. I should add my guess that in the remarks Mr. Barth makes concerning the fashioning of plot and character for The Development he draws from his own experience.
Asyasya
A wildly loquacious romp through gated retirement community living, with chapters given over to individual couples and their quirks and circumstances and relationhips with to neighbors and community in the economically/architecturally subdivided world. We have a variety of narrators, the individuals surveyed filtered through the central narrator. Be prepared for asides, digressions, and a field of diverse characters who, thankfully, are woven in and out of the narrative.
Bu
This books gives a bit of insight into the thoughts of those who are ageing and are relatively well off. And, there is nothing wrong with that. Suicide, traumatic deaths, "normal" deaths give one some pause, but make the book interesting. Death is a consideration among the old. Some of the stories were interesting reads: the peeping Tom and toga party. The post-tornado meeting was a boring story. All-in-all, the book was entertaining and makes one wonder what life may be like as one enters the final years.

I read this on a Kindle. I do not know if the paper versions of the book had the same editing problems, but there were so many places where "off" was spelled "of." Considering Barth's interesting and literary writing style, it is possible, but I do not think so, that he intended "of" to be used where "off" is the only word that would make sense. There were other errors as well, but do not recall those.
Runeterror
Exhausting Depressing Unrealistic they all should get in the car!
Way too long too much just unnecessary filler dialogue to fill pages
Cordabor
An evocation of what it may mean to be the aging fortunate generation facing The End.
Wait, that's not fair to the interest John Barth draws out as one reads. It's a fine collection--but with one caveat--the transcription to Ebook is awful. Every paragraph has a sprinkling of it's instead of its, etc.
Nuadador
A gently used copy of The Development arrived in a timely manner and in good condition as was described. I am most pleased with my purchase. I have read this wickedly funny and devastatingly on-target novel about living, aging, and dying; now I am ready to pass it on to one of my friends.
Doukasa
Average read.... Too much repetition
A humorous,bittersweet and affectionate look at the challenges of growing older in a (half) gated community. Barth at his perceptive best