Download My People's Waltz fb2

by Dale Ray Phillips
Download My People's Waltz fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Dale Ray Phillips
  • ISBN:
    0393047156
  • ISBN13:
    978-0393047158
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    W. W. Norton & Company; First Edition edition (March 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1851 kb
  • ePUB format
    1209 kb
  • DJVU format
    1581 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    861
  • Formats:
    azw doc docx lrf


traders of horses and human flesh.

My People's Waltz book. Dale Ray Phillips has only published this collection, and it came out in 1999. I know many people are anxiously awaiting his next book.

by. Dale Ray Phillips. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 24, 2012.

Richard is like a traveler or pilgrim, moving from Haw River, North Carolina, to Arkansas to the Texas Gulf Coast and finally back to North Carolina again, as he and his people - they drink hard, dance in their kitchens, lie and cheat - struggle with their love and wrestle with their often inharmonious natures. In the end the narrator struggles to straighten out some small piece of his heart's crooked essence. My People's Waltz sadly celebrates the decisions we make to get on with the business of living.

MY PEOPLE'S WALTZ By Dale Ray Phillips - Hardcover. Quick Free Delivery in 2-14 days.

6 x SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 1986 & 1987, Kristie Phillips, Sugar Ray, Giants, Browns. MY PEOPLE'S WALTZ By Dale Ray Phillips - Hardcover.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. by Dale Ray Phillips. Are you sure you want to remove My people's waltz from your list? My people's waltz. Published 1999 by W. W. Norton in New York.

Norton and Company, 1999. Highlighted Publications.

Phillips's prose flashes powerful unpredictability with every delicious little shock. Take care of the sentence, and the sentence will take care of yo. – Dale Ray Phillips. Norton and Company, 1999.

These award-winning stories introduce a heartbreaking and hilarious new voice in Southern American fiction.

"When I was thirty-five and freshly separated and still a stouthearted pilgrim to myself, I took a job on the Gulf Coast swindling people. I sold fake trailer lot deeds to investors with souls more crooked than my own." This is the voice of Richard, the winning and irrepressible narrator of this novel in stories. Here, we follow Richard's chaotic childhood informed by his parents' passionate and rocky marriage, his mother's nervous breakdowns, his traveling salesman father's erratic attempts to earn his mother's love again, and their eventual divorce, through Richard's own trials with the women in his life. Richard is like a traveler or pilgrim, moving from Haw River, North Carolina, to Arkansas to the Texas Gulf Coast and finally back to North Carolina again, as he and his people ― they drink hard, dance in their kitchens, lie and cheat ― struggle with their love and wrestle with their often inharmonious natures. In the end the narrator struggles to straighten out some small piece of his heart's crooked essence. My People's Waltz sadly celebrates the decisions we make to get on with the business of living.The stories in this collection have appeared in the Atlantic, GQ, Ploughshares, Best American Short Stories, and New Stories from the South: The Year's Best.Here's what Dale Ray Phillips has said of his own work: "Writing a story is a strange act of discovery; generally, I find that what I have uncovered is nothing more than what I have always known. Also ― and I'm embarrassed to admit this ― I love to lie, and fiction offers an acceptable channel for this compulsion."

Doriel
To limit Dale Ray Phillips by calling him a Southern Regionalist author would be sinful, but if you have ever longed to know what the insider's perspective looks like then read these stories. The collection is not about the South, though, it's about ordinary people living ordinary lives trying to make sense of the world around them. The stories are hilarious and heart-wrenching as the narrator pieces together events from his life and reflects on the meaning.
This is a "must read." Start immediately.
Runemane
Dale Ray Phillips knows how to construct a story from the ground up: gorgeous sentences, fully human characters, a deep sense of place. Wonderful. Enough said.
Rrd
A primer on what's wrong with contemporary American fiction. Okay, you're from the South, but that doesn't make you a good writer. All surface, prose pyrotechnics and slick phraseology...no real characters, story, plot or substance. Reads like a compendium of the worst of college grad student family blues MFA program pap. Faulkner, Hemingway, John O'Hara, Cheever, Flannery O'Conner...even contemporaries like T. Coraghessen Boyle outshine this turkey.
Phallozs Dwarfs
Imagine the American Dream refracted through a shattered kaleidoscope and you will begin to have sense of the life of the significant characters which populate "My People's Waltz," a series of interconnected short stories mainly revolving around the central character, Richard. Divorce, alcohol addiction, domestic violence, ruined trust and unethical business practices compete with dancing in kitchens, genuine affection, teen-age debauches and waterskiing buck naked. Richard, the son, witnesses the dissolution of his parents' marriage; Richard, the husband, participates in the deterioration of his own marriage, and Richard, the father, considers exactly what his own son, Fisher, will remember about the chaos of his own early life.
Dale Ray Phillips is a fine writer, and his style encompasses sympathy for his characters and wisdom as to their circumstances. He describes his characters: "A people like mine were not pleasure-fearing Pilgrims, nor the landed aristocracy of the Virginians who would write the Constitution...We became whatever the new landscape required: reluctant but rum-fortified revolutionary soldiers; willing purveyors of smallpox-infested blankets...traders of horses and human flesh." These "owners of damaged dreams" don't stumble through life; they make war on it. They love hard, recklessly, and without consequence. Their unions, emotional, familial or sexual, are intense and unlasting. They lie, cheat and steal with abandon. But, Philipps makes them appealing to us. Richard, his failed father, his emotionally-damaged mother, his frustrated wife Lisa -- all of them contain that quality of humanity which ultimately bonds them to us. The author provides the best description of his novel: "I wish these wer the stories of people who cavorted more with happiness than with the moments from which they needed rescue...All my people have ever aspired toward was a place where the geography of ourselves made sense."
My sole reservation of the novel derives from the disjointed, and, at times, repetitive nature of the prose. Rather than evolving as a unity, the novel is a bit too episodic, and lacks the cohesiveness of other intgegrated short-story novels. However, this criticism does not diminish my respect for the author nor for the incredibly sensitive portrait he has created for a segment of our population often ridiculed, but seldom understood.
Erennge
I didn't like it.
Buridora
Dale Ray Phillips is a great voice in American fiction. Summing up the life of the character he calls Richard, Dale Ray breaks into the broken human heart like a burglar and finds the lost riches there. His characters are lost, deaf, and knowingly unholy in a landscape of mischance, love, and unbearable knowledge. Fathers betray sons as naturally as crappies bite hooks, and lovers try to force each other into different shapes. A forceful collection of stories.
Kelerana
Dale's book, from the word go, is astonishing. His control of of craft is clear. By this, I mean that he understands character's nuance, plot's highs and lows, Bill Harrison's "what is obligatory," and, most of all, the holy necessity of knowing what is holy. Here, find selves with hands thrown from windows on the way to the outer banks. Find crooks and painters and would be horse shoe throwers. And find yourself, caught up in the dazzle of brilliant fiction. Buy this book. Or I'm out now, looking for you.
These linked stories announce a major new voice in American fiction. They investigate through the narrator, Richard, the demise of the American dream at the end of a millennium. Written in prose that takes your breath, I would suggest these stories anyone brave enough to take a hard look at the landscape of loss. To quote the book jacket blurb by Fred Chapel, "My People's Waltz is an experience during which you forget to breath." Highest reccommendations.