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by Joshua S. Mostow
Download Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image (English and Japanese Edition) fb2
Poetry
  • Author:
    Joshua S. Mostow
  • ISBN:
    0824817052
  • ISBN13:
    978-0824817053
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Hawaii Pr (December 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    522 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1171 kb
  • ePUB format
    1224 kb
  • DJVU format
    1888 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    525
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf azw lrf


This book penetrates to the heart of traditional Japanese aesthetics a rigorous and engaging study of an extremely important Japanese text.

Joshua S. Mostow, Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image (1996)

Other translations include: William N. Porter, A Hundred Verses from Old Japan (1909). Clay MacCauley, Hyakunin-isshu (Single Songs of a Hundred Poets) (1917). Joshua S. Mostow, Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image (1996). Emiko Miyashita and Michael Dylan Welch, 100 Poets: Passions of the Imperial Court (2008).

The Hyakunin Isshu was compiled at the beginning of the 13th century as a kind of. .

The Hyakunin Isshu was compiled at the beginning of the 13th century as a kind of private collection, thought to decorate with it the walls of his rural mansion at Ogura, by one of the greatest of Japanese poets: Fujiwara no Teika (a noted poet and compiler of anthologies, among them the Shinkokinshu and the Shinchokusenshu).

The Hyakunin Isshu, or One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each collection, is a sequence of one hundred Japanese poems .

The Hyakunin Isshu, or One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each collection, is a sequence of one hundred Japanese poems in the tanka form, selected by the famous poet and scholar Fujiwara no Teika (1162-1241) and arranged, in part, to represent the history of Japanese poetry from the seventh century down to Teika's own day. The anthology is, without doubt, the most popular and widely known collection of poetry in Japan - a distinction it has maintained for hundreds of years.

Pictures of the Heart book. In this study, Joshua Mostow challenges the idea of a final or authoritative reading of the Hyakunin Isshu and presents a refreshing, persuasive case for a reception history of this seminal work. Mostow’s Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image A new book on the Hyakunin . Mostow’s Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image A new book on the Hyakunin Isshu. The 1909 Porter Translation Courtesy of Sacred Texts Homepage.

This book penetrates to the heart of traditional Japanese aesthetics a rigorous and engaging study of an extremely important Japanese text.

Japanese (1955), Tom Galt, The Little Treasury of One Hundred People, One Poem Each (1982), Joshua S. Mostow, Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image (1996), Peter McMillan, One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each (2008), and Emiko Miyashita and Michael Dylan. Mostow, Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image (1996), Peter McMillan, One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each (2008), and Emiko Miyashita and Michael Dylan Welch, 100 Poets: Passions of the Imperial Court (2008).

Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image

Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image. University of Hawai'i Press, 1996. Saga-bon Ise monogatari: The Most Influential Book in Early-Modern Japan, The Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Sept. Professor Joshua S. Mostow received his doctorate in the Comparative Literature and Literary Theory Program of the University of Pennsylvania. He has studied at International Christian University (Mitaka, Japan), Universite de Paris (III, VII, and Ecole pratique des Hautes Etudes), and Gakushuin University (Tokyo).

Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image, ^ Ogurayama: Latitude: 34° 53' 60 N, Longitude: 135° 46' 60 E; Kyoto Prefecture web site: northwest of Arashiyama Park. Hishikawa, Moronobu; Fujiwara, Sadaie (1680). 100 Poems by 100 Poets". Brower, Robert H. "Fujiwara Teika's Hundred-Poem Sequence of the 'Shoji Era'.

The Hyakunin Isshu, or One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each collection, is a sequence of one hundred Japanese poems in the tanka form, selected by the famous poet and scholar Fujiwara no Teika (1162-1241) and arranged, in part, to represent the history of Japanese poetry from the seventh century down to Teika's own day. The anthology is, without doubt, the most popular and widely known collection of poetry in Japan - a distinction it has maintained for hundreds of years. In this study, Joshua Mostow challenges the idea of a final or authoritative reading of the Hyakunin Isshu and presents a refreshing, persuasive case for a reception history of this seminal work.In addition to providing a new translation of this classic text and biographical information on each poet, Mostow examines issues relating to text and image that are central to the Japanese arts from the Heian into the early modern period. By using Edo-period woodblock illustrations as pictorializations of the poems - as "pictures of the heart," or meaning, of the poems - text and image are pieced together in a holistic approach that will stand as a model for further research in the interrelationship between Japanese visual and verbal art.

Arcanescar
I am always apprehensive when I buy a book concerning Heian or Japanese culture because of how hard it can be for westerners to understand the culture. This book however has very little of that fault. It's more than just a complete collection the 100 poets 1 poem each. It is a massive commentary on the work and Heian culture in general. The quality of the book is quite high, the pages feel nice and thick, you can highlight generously without fear and there is space to write in the margins. A near perfect book. I'm sad I did not get a hardcover.
Era
There's quite a few English (and other) translations of the Hyakunin Isshu. This stems from the fact that we are talking about a very classical anthology of Japanese Literature and that it is reasonably small (100 poems, and being waka poems, quite small at that).

The Hyakunin Isshu was compiled at the beginning of the 13th century as a kind of private collection, thought to decorate with it the walls of his rural mansion at Ogura, by one of the greatest of Japanese poets: Fujiwara no Teika (a noted poet and compiler of anthologies, among them the Shinkokinshu and the Shinchokusenshu). Much later, it would become a very popular text, a staple book for the Japanese of lower classes when studying the old waka poetry tradition (which always remained quite elitist and aristocratically oriented) or for women's education. The more noted printers of the Edo period and later would make nice editions with drawings of the poets and the poems, including also extensive commentaries in the editions with different interpretations of the poems and their arcane images and language.

So... Why is Mostow's edition so good? It includes the poems in carefully made translations. It includes pictures from different books (and even kimono patterns), explaining why the images are not just 'illustrations' of the text and act as 'pictorializations' (they create and independent and proper iconic language with pictorial metaphors for their textual equivalent, and they sort out and choose their images among different possibilities reflected in the criticism). And it also includes comments with biographical information on the poets and the interpretations of each poem.

Overall, this is a delightful edition of the Hyakunin Isshu, which merges good scholarship and nice reading qualities. I heartily recommend it.
Laizel
This is the translation that shows various images throughout time, comprehensive descriptions and has Japanese and English translations of the poems side by side.

For great commentary and background, I return to this one again and again.

I love the line illustrations.

Happy browsing and reading!