Download WHATSAID Serif fb2

by Nathaniel Mackey
Download WHATSAID Serif fb2
Poetry
  • Author:
    Nathaniel Mackey
  • ISBN:
    0872863417
  • ISBN13:
    978-0872863415
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    City Lights Publishers; First Edition edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    112 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1674 kb
  • ePUB format
    1530 kb
  • DJVU format
    1834 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    557
  • Formats:
    lit mobi lrf lit


Named after a Dogon funeral song whose raspy tonalities prelude rebirth, Song of the Andoumboulou has from its inception tracked interweavings of lore and livid apprehension, advancing this weave as its own sort of rasp.

Nathaniel Mackey has long been one of our most interesting poets. In Whatsaid Serif, he advances his long running poetic sequence "The Song of the Andoumboulou" another 19 pieces(according to the Dogon,the Andoumboulou are human beings created by a bumbling, incompetent, rookie god, beings who don't exactly correspond to the intended idea of the human; in other words, "they are us. These poems feature a movement, both geographical and spiritual, across.

The subject matter of Whatsaid Serif is similar to Splay Anthem,though I would say Splay Anthem takes it not only in a somewhat darker, more final direction, but also plays it against the series of Mu poems the Mackey has written as well. The title perhaps says more about it then I can, however.

let's say that 10,000 years ago, mackey traced with a twig the letters of eliot's wasteland and gazed thru a gloss onto lafogue's landscape, a luxury in the most tenuous of senses, as was wideman's from home hurried trip to spain just a little less tenuous, give or take a millennium. in whatsaid serif, mackey writes:.

by. Nathaniel Mackey. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

PROFILE Nathaniel Mackey, major American poet, as well as a novelist and critical theorist, received the 2006 National Book Award for Poetry .

PROFILE Nathaniel Mackey, major American poet, as well as a novelist and critical theorist, received the 2006 National Book Award for Poetry for Splay Anthem (2006), an epic work about a lost tribe in the imperial, flailing republic of Nub the United States has become, the shrunken place the earth has become, planet Nub.  . Writing in Black Issues in Higher Education Lenard D. Moore called Whatsaid Serif, a testament to the magic, possibilities, and audacity of exceedingly noteworthy poetry. Mackey’s novels form part of the ongoing cycle, From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate, about the adventures of a jazz-and-poetry ensemble called the Mystic Horn Society.

A new volume of the singular, ongoing, great American jazz novel. Nathaniel Mackey's Late Arcade opens in Los Angeles. A musician known only as N. writes the first of a series of letters to the enigmatic Angel of Dust. s jazz sextet, Molimo m'Atet, has just rehearsed a new tune: the horn players read from The Egyptian Book of the Dead with lips clothespinned shut, while the rest of the band struts and saunters in a cosmic hymn to the sun god Ra. N. ends this breathless session by sending the Angel of Dust a cassette tape of their rehearsal.

632" National Book Award for Poetry

Mackey's books of poetry include the chapbooks Four for Trane (1978) and Septet for the End of Time (1983); and the books Eroding Witness (1985), School of Udhra (1993), Whatsaid Serif (1998), Splay Anthem (2006), Nod House (2011), and Blue Fasa (2016) Mackey's series o.

Mackey's books of poetry include the chapbooks Four for Trane (1978) and Septet for the End of Time (1983); and the books Eroding Witness (1985), School of Udhra (1993), Whatsaid Serif (1998), Splay Anthem (2006), Nod House (2011), and Blue Fasa (2016) Mackey's series of improvisatory jazz-inspired fictions locates a ground between invention and listening that he defines as the source of culture itself.

Named after a Dogon funeral song whose raspy tonalities prelude rebirth, Song of the Andoumboulou has from its inception tracked interweavings of lore and lived apprehension, advancing this weave as its own sort of rasp.

Whatsaid Serif, Nathaniel Mackey’s third book of poems, is comprised of installments sixteen through thirty-five of Song of the Andoumboulou, an ongoing serial work whose first fifteen installments appear in Eroding Witness and School of Udhra, his two previous books. Named after a Dogon funeral song whose raspy tonalities prelude rebirth, Song of the Andoumboulou has from its inception tracked interweavings of lore and livid apprehension, advancing this weave as its own sort of rasp. These twenty new installments evoke the what-sayer of Kakapalo storying practice as a figure for the rough texture of such interweaving. Mackey has suggested that the Andoumboulou, a failed, earlier form of human being in Dogon cosmology, are “a rough draft of human being,” that “the Andoumboulou are in fact us; we're the rough draft.” The song is of possibility, yet to be fulfilled, aspiration’s putative angel itself.

"Nathaniel Mackey's poem is a brilliant renewal of and experiment with the language of our spiritual condition and a measure of what poetry gives in trust - 'heat's/mean' and the rush of language to bear it." —Robin Blaser

"Mackey's raspy rebus-like cultural resurfacings are both beautiful to read and worthy of repeated efforts at comprehension." —Publishers Weekly

Nathaniel Mackey, recipient of a 1993 Whiting Writers’ Award, is the author of School of Udhra and Atet A.D., both also published by City Lights Publishers. He won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2006, was awarded the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize in 2014, and won Yale's Bollingen Prize for American Poetry in 2015. He teaches a poetry workshop at Duke University.


Uickabrod
let's say that 10,000 years ago, mackey traced with a twig the letters of eliot's wasteland and gazed thru a gloss onto lafogue's landscape, a luxury in the most tenuous of senses, as was wideman's from home hurried trip to spain just a little less tenuous, give or take a millennium.

in whatsaid serif, mackey writes:

...it was a train /in southern spain we/were on...

...it was a train we were on,/peripatetic tavern we/were in...

...expression/was on the jukebox...

...someone punched `people get ready'/on the jukebox...

the song mackey mentions begins `people get ready, there's a train a'comin' recorded by the impressions with curtis mayfield in 1964.

riddle and word play, allusion and anagram run thru this song cloth.

mackey knows sufi translates as cloth, sophia as wisdom. mackey has woven, is weaving, a poem of the world, of world poetry, of words and imagery quantumed on impressions of time-traveled jazz and its musical cousins:

...a train/less of thought than of quantum/solace, quantum locale...

or what more he can do with a metaphor:

...boated whether/we came by train or/by bus...

pulling together in just nine words the african diaspora, and vacation and holiday homecomings.

because i prefer train travel i concentrated on that one strand, one of many strands mackey weaves in his ongoing poem.

when slaves, on their way to freedom on the underground railroad, sang of a destination they might had sang of a train to jordan. in mackey's ongoing song there is neither place name, destination nor direction. there is the getting away, the going, for those who can as well as those who can't. and there's the telling, if told only by songs heard on a jukebox.

so what say you? mackey saying:

...i was the what-sayer./ whatever he said i would/ say so what...

jazz listeners will recall miles davis' call and refrain by the name of so what.

say what? said.
komandante
Nathaniel Mackey has long been one of our most interesting poets. In Whatsaid Serif, he advances his long running poetic sequence "The Song of the Andoumboulou" another 19 pieces(according to the Dogon,the Andoumboulou are human beings created by a bumbling, incompetent, rookie god, beings who don't exactly correspond to the intended idea of the human; in other words, "they are us".)These poems feature a movement, both geographical and spiritual, across an African landscape rich in displacement, myth, and mystery, a train on tracks and a train of thought that yields many stunning phrases. Much of the language - a language that unifies thought and desire - is explicitely gnostic, of the sort that conflates eros and divinity. Robin Blaser writes of this book, accurately, that "Mackey's poem is a brilliant renewel of and experiment with the language of our spiritual condition and a measure of what poetry gives in trust -'heart's/meat' and the rush of language to bear it." This book has meant a great deal to me. I can't recommend it highly enough.
Gorisar
Nathaniel Mackey has long been one of our most interesting poets. In Whatsaid Serif, he advances his long running poetic sequence "The Song of the Andoumboulou" another 19 pieces(according to the Dogon,the Andoumboulou are human beings created by a bumbling, incompetent, rookie god, beings who don't exactly correspond to the intended idea of the human; in other words, "they are us".)These poems feature a movement, both geographical and spiritual, across an African landscape rich in displacement, myth, and mystery, a train on tracks and a train of thought that yields many stunning phrases. Much of the language - a language that unifies thought and desire - is explicitely gnostic, of the sort that conflates eros and divinity. Robin Blaser writes of this book, accurately, that "Mackey's poem is a brilliant renewel of and experiment with the language of our spiritual condition and a measure of what poetry gives in trust -'heart's/meat' and the rush of language to bear it." This book has meant a great deal to me. I can't recommend it highly enough.