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by Alicia Ostriker
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Poetry
  • Author:
    Alicia Ostriker
  • ISBN:
    0822958759
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822958758
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Pittsburgh Press; 1 edition (March 15, 2005)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1479 kb
  • ePUB format
    1403 kb
  • DJVU format
    1413 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    712
  • Formats:
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The Book of Seventy (Pitt Poetry Series). Alicia Suskin Ostriker.

The Book of Seventy (Pitt Poetry Series). Waiting for the Light (Pitt Poetry Series). Reading Alicia Suskin Ostriker's poems in No Heaven is like having someone who needs to impart something essential to you leaning in, quietly and yet with great intensity, showing you something of utmost importance, never lecturing, never condescending, the unearthing of vital information seeming to occur in the moment of telling, so when, the payoffs in the poems themselves take place, in.

by Alicia Suskin Ostriker. Alicia Suskin Ostriker's voice has long been acknowledged as a major force in American poetry. In "No Heaven," her eleventh collection, she takes a hint from John Lennon's "Imagine" to wrestle with the world as it is: "no hell below us,, above us only sk. It is a world of cities, including New York, London, Jerusalem, and Berlin, where the poet can celebrate pickup basketball, peace marches, and the energy of graffiti.

Alicia Suskin Ostriker’s voice has long been acknowledged as a major force in American poetry. At times lyric, at times satiric, Ostriker steadfastly pursuesin No Heaven her poetics of ardor, a passion for the here and now that has chastened and consoled her many devoted readers. In No Heaven, her eleventh collection, she takes a hint from John Lennon’s Imagine to wrestle with the world as it is: no hell below us,, above us only sky. Discussion Questions.

In No Heaven Alicia Ostriker is at the top of her form. The poems 'hang in the air like Nijinsky taking a nap'-no need of heaven when the living can perform such feats. In No Heaven, her eleventh co lection, she takes a hint from John Lennon's "Imagine" to wrestle with the world as it is: "no hell below us,, above us only sk.

Let us now praise famous cities,’ says Alicia Ostriker in Waiting for the Light. The eyes with which Alicia Ostriker sees the world are realistic, yet full of empathy, appreciation, and sometimes a haunting sorrow, and because of all that, those eyes are highly perceptive and privileged. This collection is divided into four parts, and city scenes-mostly of New York City and a couple for Guyana and Bangladesh, and diversity of cultures and socio-political issues abound in all of the parts.

No Heaven Quotes Showing 1-1 of 1. Somewhere under the hurricane a sea turtle rows through silence. Alicia Suskin Ostriker, No Heaven. All Quotes Quotes By Alicia Suskin Ostriker.

Alicia Suskin Ostriker (born November 11, 1937) is an American poet and scholar who writes Jewish feminist poetry. She was called "America's most fiercely honest poet" by Progressive. Additionally, she was one of the first women poets. Additionally, she was one of the first women poets in America to write and publish poems discussing the topic of motherhood. In 2015, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. In 2018, she was named the New York State Poet Laureate.

Poet, critic, and activist Alicia Ostriker was born in 1937 in New York City

Poet, critic, and activist Alicia Ostriker was born in 1937 in New York City. She earned degrees from Brandeis and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The second episode of our special series exploring poetry and the women's movement looks at several books in the 1960s and '70s that fought for a place for women.

Alicia Ostriker seizes the opportunity to take us where too few poets have been able to take us: into a domain of. .

Alicia Ostriker seizes the opportunity to take us where too few poets have been able to take us: into a domain of what our fabulists like to call the golden years. as we live longer, we become inevitably curious about the actual texture of these late years, curious about what happens in the soul. Out of that curiosity is a new kind of poetry born, an elderstile that has passion and irony, wisdom, folly, clarity and tenderness. In her keen engagement with the self and the world, Ostriker offers us a voice and a perspective that explore the territory of seventy and beyond.

Alicia Suskin Ostriker's voice has long been acknowledged as a major force in American poetry. In No Heaven, her eleventh collection, she takes a hint from John Lennon's "Imagine" to wrestle with the world as it is: "no hell below us, / above us only sky."

It is a world of cities, including New York, London, Jerusalem, and Berlin, where the poet can celebrate pickup basketball, peace marches, and the energy of graffiti. It is also a world of families, generations coming and going, of love, love affairs, and friendship. Then it is a world full of art and music, of Rembrandt and Bonnard, Mozart and Brahms. Finally, it is a world haunted by violence and war. <I>No Heaven</I> rises to a climax with elegies for Yitzhak Rabin, assassinated by an Israeli zealot, and for the poet's mother, whose death is experienced in the context of a post-9/11 impulse to destroy that seems to seduce whole nations.

Yet Ostriker's ultimate stance is to "Try to praise the mutilated world," as the poet Adam Zagajewski has counseled. At times lyric, at times satiric, Ostriker steadfastly pursuesin No Heaven her poetics of ardor, a passion for the here and now that has chastened and consoled her many devoted readers.


Wohald
(Alicia Ostriker read at the West Side YMCA on Friday, February 2, 2007 as part of the Writer's Voice Visiting Authors Series. This is from my introduction to the event).

Reading Alicia Suskin Ostriker's poems in No Heaven is like having someone who needs to impart something essential to you leaning in, quietly and yet with great intensity, showing you something of utmost importance, never lecturing, never condescending, the unearthing of vital information seeming to occur in the moment of telling, so when, the payoffs in the poems themselves take place, in the burst of the revealed moment, the impact is intense and profound.

The ease of the language, its casualness and conversationality might make one overlook to care with which the language here is wrought.

Alicia shows relationships as clearly the commingling of two distinct entities; whether we completely understand the person we're with or not, these poem's simple conversations mirror the familiarity of those long together, whether lover, family member or dear friend. There's that easy connection, yet always so fragile, knowing that we must make ready to part from all we love and hold dear, and yet how we must always stay in the moment, so that what we have will not become subsumed by what we have lost, or will lose. She writes, in the poem "Mid-February":

"Friend, it's a day for a walk

are we going to walk it?"

...and that becomes the challenge of these poems, to have us not waste the day, not take for granted that the beauty and pain and joy and sorrow will continue ever on.
Modifyn
Alicia Ostriker is a quintessential American poet in the tradition of Walt Whitman and Muriel Rukeyser. NO HEAVEN is the follow-up to Ostriker's brilliant VOLCANO SEQUENCE (lamentably left off the Pulitzer, National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award lists)--and here once again we find Ostriker writing poems about real people, crucial human experience and the spiritual essence that runs through everything. NO HEAVEN is a brilliant collection that is hard hitting ("Liking It," "Tearing the Poem Up and Eating It," "Elegy before the War,"), tender ("Brooklyn Twilight," "In the Forty-Fifth Year of Marriage"), and humorous ("When we leap, we hang in the air like Nijinsky taking a nap" from "Pickup," ". . .when/that brilliant Jew poet took/The train for the next world/American nirvana/Temporarily went with him" from "Elegy for Allen.") NO HEAVEN contains crucial poems for our misguided times from one of America's (or should I say the world's?) best, bravest, and most eloquent poets.
Fearlessrunner
No Heaven is a terrific book-- just what poetry should be: at once moving, because it touches old and deep knowledge, and new because it opens heart and mind again. Death is always present as real, heightening consciousness. Every poem contains "a piercing glance into the life of things," as Marianne Moore said, a unity of soul and form. Ostriker reveals the horror and sacredness of everyday life by constantly reinventing the words believed to be ordinary, here transformed. Buy this beautiful collection and find yourself in no heaven but on incandescent eternal ephemeral earth -- the place to be human.