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by Dustin H. Griffin
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Poetry
  • Author:
    Dustin H. Griffin
  • ISBN:
    0691063710
  • ISBN13:
    978-0691063713
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Princeton University Press; First edition (January 21, 1979)
  • Pages:
    306 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
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Alexander Pope: The Poet in Poems. by Dustin H. Griffin. In some poems, Pope confronts quite openly his fervent moral idealism with his powerful aggressive feelings, and he explores his conflicting impulses toward retirement and engagement

Alexander Pope: The Poet in Poems. In some poems, Pope confronts quite openly his fervent moral idealism with his powerful aggressive feelings, and he explores his conflicting impulses toward retirement and engagement. In others, he reveals impulses and attractions that he would not admit to full consciousness in his letters. Pope is also present as poet-protagonist, self-consciously attempting to present and master a body of poetic material.

Alexander Pope Poems. Sort by: Views Alphabetically. Imitations of Horace: The First Epistle of the Second Book. 18. Impromptu, to Lady Winchelsea. Total Poems: 33. 1. Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog Which I Gave to His Royal Highness.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Alexander Pope: The Poet in the Poems. by. Dustin H. What is the precise relation between the "Pope" of the poems and the Pope of history?

Автор: Griffin Dustin H. Название: Alexander Pope: The Poet in Poems Издательство: Wiley . The author argues that Pope is present in his poems as a private person whose special imaginative and psychological concerns emerge because they are expressed publicly.

The author argues that Pope is present in his poems as a private person whose special imaginative and psychological concerns emerge because they are expressed publicly.

Poem Hunter all poems of by Alexander Pope poems. 81 poems of Alexander Pope. Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744, London, England).

Dustin M. Griffin, Alexander: The Poet in the Poems (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978). Joseph V. Guerinot, Pamphlet Attacks on Alexander Pope, 1711-1744 (New York: New York University Press, 1969). Brean Hammond, Pope and Bolingbroke: A Study of Friendship and Influence (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1984).

Series: Princeton Legacy Library.

Xvii, 285 pages ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. I. Pope the man. An approach to Pope ; 2. Pope's selves: a view of his literary personality - II. Studies in Pope's poems. 3. "Candidate for praise": the 1717 volume ; 4. Poetry and friendship: the familiar epistles ; 5. "Ourselves to know": the poet in An essay on man ; 6. Personal drama in Pope's Horatian Imitations ; 7. Pope in The Dunciad. Committed to retain 20160630.

Alexander Pope’s witty and pointed poetic satire brought him infamy during .

Alexander Pope’s witty and pointed poetic satire brought him infamy during his lifetime. It has also made critical evaluation of Pope in the years since his death more prone to interpretation based on the critic’s personal feelings about such satire than perhaps any other poet in history. In 1712, Pope published his most famous poem, The Rape of the Lock, which made him one of England’s most famous poets. Pope’s anonymous publication of the book did nothing to dissuade popular opinion that he was the author, and reaction was so hostile from both the targets of the satire and their friends that Pope would not leave home without his pistols.

Chicago Distribution Center. Griffin," Modern Philology 78, no. 3 (Fe. 1981): 310-314. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Cary Wolfe, What Is Posthumanism? Chute.

What is the precise relation between the "Pope" of the poems and the Pope of history? Seeking to clarify the nature of the intimate link between the historical self and the idealized self of the poetry, Dustin Griffin examines the various ways in which Pope's poems may be said to be self-expressive. He brings a sensitive critical reading of the texts and an impressive knowledge of the poet's life and writings to his discussion of poems from the entire range of the poet's career.

The author argues that Pope is present in his poems as a private person whose special imaginative and psychological concerns emerge because they are expressed publicly. In some poems, Pope confronts quite openly his fervent moral idealism with his powerful aggressive feelings, and he explores his conflicting impulses toward retirement and engagement. In others, he reveals impulses and attractions that he would not admit to full consciousness in his letters. Pope is also present as poet-protagonist, self-consciously attempting to present and master a body of poetic material. Professor Griffin's study recovers some of the personal energy that invigorates Pope's greatest poems and makes them strikingly self-expressive products of an imagination intrigued and often at odds with itself and, yet more sharply, with the world.

Originally published in 1979.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.