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by Taha Muhammad Ali,Peter Cole
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Poetry
  • Author:
    Taha Muhammad Ali,Peter Cole
  • ISBN:
    9659012527
  • ISBN13:
    978-9659012527
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ibis Editions; 1st edition (December 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    112 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1485 kb
  • ePUB format
    1520 kb
  • DJVU format
    1862 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    420
  • Formats:
    doc lrf txt mbr


Taha Muhammad Ali is one of the leading poets on the contemporary Palestinian literary scene.

Find nearly any book by Taha Muhammad Ali. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. So What?: New and Selected Poems 1971. by Taha Muhammad Ali. ISBN 9781852247928 (978-1-85224-792-8) Softcover, Bloodaxe Books Ltd, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'So What?: New and Selected Poems 1971'.

The 89 pages of stories and poems here are introduced by a fawning essay by Gabriel Levin, almost half as long. Taha's poems, like those of Mahmoud Darwish, drip with violence and hatred. This is false, hateful and ugly stuff, which merely incites continued wars against the Jewish people. Levin's admiration rests on his false belief that Taha at age seventeen "was forced to leave with his family for Lebanon, after his village was razed to the ground by the Israeli army in the Arab-Israeli war of 1948," in what he describes as "the shattering and exodus of the Palestinian community. I recommend Fuad Attal's "Love and Memory," instead.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2001, Issa J. Boullata and others published Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story .

As such, we purpose to analyze the books O diário escondido de Serafina (2006), by Cristina Porto and Michele Iacocca, and As cartas de Ronroroso (2008), de Hiawyin Oram and Sarah Warburton, which highlight a hybrid mixture of genres.

Taha Muhammad Ali speaks with an emotional forthrightness. Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story, this bilingual book of verse will bring a. .Taha Muhammad Ali is a leading poet in Palestinian

Taha Muhammad Ali speaks with an emotional forthrightness. He has developed a style that seems both ancient and new, deceptively simple and movingly direct. -The Washington Post. Expanding on Ali�s previous collection,Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story, this bilingual book of verse will bring a wider readership to a major Palestinian poet Читать весь отзыв. Taha Muhammad Ali is a leading poet in Palestinian.

Palestinian poet and short story writer Taha Muhammad Ali grew up in Saffuriya, Galilee. During the Arab-Israeli war in 1948, he moved with his family to Lebanon for a year; since then he has lived in Nazareth, where he owns a souvenir shop. Self-taught through his readings of classical Arabic literature, American fiction, and English poetry, Ali started writing poems in the 1970s. His collections in English include Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story (2000) and So What: New and Selected Poems, 1971–2005 (2006)

Palestinian poet and short story writer Taha Muhammad Ali grew up in Saffuriya, Galilee. His collections in English include Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story (2000) and So What: New and Selected Poems, 1971–2005 (2006).

Taha Muhammad Ali is one of the leading Palestinian poets working today . He is the author of three volumes of poetry in Arabic: Fourth Qasida, Fooling the Killers, and Fire in the Convent. His first collection in English, Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story, appeared in 2000. Individual poems in the collection were translated by Peter Cole, Yahya Hijazi and Gabriel Levin. Popular among Arab readers of both Israel and Palestine for his politically complex and sensitive work, Ali is a self-taught, self-educated poet who first began publishing at the age of 52.

Taha Muhammad Ali fled to Lebanon with his family when he was seventeen after their village came under heavy . Never Mind: Twenty Poems and a Story.

Taha Muhammad Ali fled to Lebanon with his family when he was seventeen after their village came under heavy bombardment during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. The following year, he returned to Nazareth, where he lived till his death. In the 1950s and 1960s, he sold souvenirs during the day to Christian pilgrims and studied poetry at night. His formal education ended after fourth grade. German and French translations are underway.

Taha Muhammad Ali is one of the leading poets on the contemporary Palestinian literary scene. He writes in a forceful, direct style, with disarming humor and unflinching, at times, painful, honesty -- the poetry's apparent simplicity and homespun truths concealing the subtle grafting of classical Arabic and colloquial forms of expression. NEVER MIND is the poet's first collection in English. Translated by Peter Cole and Gabriel Levin.

Kuve
The 89 pages of stories and poems here are introduced by a fawning essay by Gabriel Levin, almost half as long. Levin's admiration rests on his false belief that Taha at age seventeen "was forced to leave with his family for Lebanon, after his village was razed to the ground by the Israeli army in the Arab-Israeli war of 1948," in what he describes as "the shattering and exodus of the Palestinian community." Unfortunately, empirical historical evidence doesn't support Levin's sad fairy tale.

Undoubtedly, Taha fled Saffuriya to Lebanon in July 1948, and returned with his family in 1949 to Nazareth, where they later became Israeli citizens. But IDF forces did NOT drive Taha or his family to flee Saffuriya. Actually, "Saffuriya's inhabitants" engaged in many violent incursions into Jewish communities, and fled BEFORE the IDF took the village---because they expected and feared "revenge for their numerous onslaughts upon Jews," according to operational orders, oral testimonies and diaries cited by historian Yoav Gelber, in Palestine 1948 (p. 165). The villagers fled of their own accord, BEFORE the battle, fearful of retaliation for their collective role in violent attacks against Jewish civilians.

Moreover, Israel's attack on Saffuriya was defensive. Even Levin's 37-page essay admits that Taha's village "had sheltered local militiamen." Indeed, in the 1930s, Saffuriya served as a center for anti-Jewish radicalism and attacks. In 1948, it was the command post of Arab Liberation Army leader Fawzi al-Qawuqji, who rejected the June 11, 1948, UN-imposed truce. Furthermore, Madlul Abbas' Hittin regiment controlled Nazareth, negatively influencing villages like Saffuriya.

Now to the poems. Some of the language is lyrical and lovely, as in "I hate departure.../ I love the spring/ and the path to the spring,/ and I worship the middle/ hours of morning."

But most is militant, angry, and vengeful. In "Empty Words," Taha wishes his notebook had produced words saying, "I wish I could be/ a rock on a hill/ which the young men/ from Hebron explode/ and offer as a gift to Jerusalem's children,/ ammunition for their palms and slings." He wanted a passage where he is "gazing out from on high/ hundreds of years from now/ over hordes/ of masked liberators!" He mourns that "empty words" in his notebook "frighten no enemy...." Taha in other words lauds the murder of innocent children, provided they are Jewish of course.

He also makes false poetic claims. In "Amerbris," he calls Israel's land a whore taken by "newcomers,/ sailors and usurpers," whom he writes "uproot the backyard hardens,/ burying trees." That's his opinion. However, the land that Jewish farmers worked was purchased at above-market rates from Arab landowners. It was not stolen. Maybe the Arab sellers were whores, but certainly not the buyers, and certainly not the land itself.

In "Warning," a version of which Taha read at the Dodge Poetry Festival, he makes the false accusation that Israelis "aim your rifles/ at my happiness...." To Taha, Israelis are "killers." But those soldiers are necessary because Arabs continue to try to kill Jews, just as Taha himself would like to do with his rocks. But for that, no Israeli soldiers would need riffles, which are merely to protect the innocent from firing terrorists, not to shoot randomly at unarmed civilians.

In "Abd El Hadi the Fool," the speaker transforms into a warrior, "no longer a fool." With "bitterness" in his soul, he wants to "burn down the world!" He waits, as the ages drag on, and "lower my eyelashes/ on the raging,/ communing with it/ and longing for bombers!"

Taha's poems, like those of Mahmoud Darwish, drip with violence and hatred. This is false, hateful and ugly stuff, which merely incites continued wars against the Jewish people. I recommend Fuad Attal's "Love and Memory," instead.

--Alyssa A. Lappen
Thomand
Taha's limpid and lyrical poems do what wondrous poetry always does. They deliver sensual plesure with their music and special sensibility--they tell us what it means to be alive, in particular ways, "touch the herbs/the wild artichoke and chicory," and to grieve over our losses, again in particular ways: "fatigue, hunger, vagrancy/debt..." These poems embrace the land of Taha's origins, yet never veer into ideology or hatred. They glow with a love of what we are and what we must suffer. Bravo.
Modar
Beautiful. Expresses the themes and feelings that come from an identity with a particular place which is a universal experience. Love, home, self, loss, wonder, birth, time, the sweet and sardonic goings on of one's community, and one's own life there. Taha may be Palestinian, but to me he is affiliated with the monks of Tibet who sit on platforms in the Himalayas, on the roof of the world, and chant, constantly, weaving us with their chests and humming into the rythms of order in universe. And if you ever have the chance to see and hear him, you'll agree, I think.
Silvermaster
There may, in fact, be a book about the Palestinian Arab dilemma waiting to be written, but this treacly and biased pretense is not it. The Arab's hard turn in Palestine came as a result of an unrelenting war to extirpate all Jews from all of Palestine. If and when Arab writers really confront these facts they will properly blame their "leaders" instead of the habitual Israel bashing. Then some real poetry and literature may emerge instead of this amateur effort.