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by Gerald Stern
Download Save the Last Dance: Poems fb2
Poetry
  • Author:
    Gerald Stern
  • ISBN:
    0393066126
  • ISBN13:
    978-0393066128
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (May 17, 2008)
  • Pages:
    80 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1588 kb
  • ePUB format
    1405 kb
  • DJVU format
    1556 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    711
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf doc rtf


Save the Last Dance book. In Save the Last Dance, Gerald Stern gives us a stunning collection of his intimately personal-yet always universal, and always surprising-poems, rich with humor and insight.

Save the Last Dance book. Shorter lyric poems in the first two parts continue the satirical and often redemptive vision of his last collection, Everything Is Burning, while never failing to carve out new emotional territory.

91 pages ; 22 cm. "In Save the Last Dance, Gerald Stern gives us a collection of his intimately personal - yet universal and surprising - poems. Shorter lyric poems in the first two parts continue the satirical and redemptive vision of his last. Shorter lyric poems in the first two parts continue the satirical and redemptive vision of his last collection, Everything is Burning, while still carving out new emotional territory.

was our life and such were our lives the last few years before the war when there were four flavors of ice cream and four flavors only; I'll call him Fatty; I'll call him Peter; Jésus, I'll call him, but only in Spanish, with the "h" sound, as it is in Mexico; Jésus, kiss me again, Jésus, you saved me, Jésus, I can't forget you; and what was her name who gave me the towel? and who was I? and what is love doing in a sewer, and how is disgrace blurred now, or buried? Gerald Stern. Poems by Gerald Stern : 27, 43. prev.

In Save the Last Dance, Gerald Stern gives us a stunning collection of his intimately personal-yet always universal, and always surprising-poems, rich with humor and insight.

Gerald Stern has been called an American original, a sometimes comic, sometimes tragic visionary, and, by his friend Stanley Kunitz, the wildernes. Save the Last Dance: Poems, Norton (New York, NY), 2008

Gerald Stern has been called an American original, a sometimes comic, sometimes tragic visionary, and, by his friend Stanley Kunitz, the wildernes. Save the Last Dance: Poems, Norton (New York, NY), 2008. Early Collected Poems: 1965–1992, Norton (New York, NY), 2010.

Gerald Stern - 1925-. Gerald Stern was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1925

Gerald Stern - 1925-. How you loved to read in the snow and when your face turned to water from the internal heat combined with the heavy crystals or maybe it was reversus you went half-blind and your eyelashes turned to ice the time you walked through swirls with dirty tears not far from the rat-filled river or really a mile away-or two-in. Gerald Stern was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1925. His recent poetry collections include Galaxy Love (W. W. Norton, 2017); Divine Nothingness (W. Norton, 2014); In Beauty Bright (W. Norton, 2012); Early Collected Poems: 1965-1992 (W. Norton, 2010), and Save the Last Dance (2008).

Gerald Stern was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1925 and was educated at the .

Gerald Stern was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1925 and was educated at the University of Pittsburgh and Columbia University. He did post-graduate study at the University of Paris in 1949-50. He is the author of fourteen books of poetry including, This Time: New and Selected Poems, which won the National Book Award in 1998, and most recently Everything is Burning published in 2005, both from . A collection of personal essays titled What I Can’t Bear Losing: Notes From a Life was released in the fall of 2003, also by .

Throughout Save the Last Dance, Gerald Stern writes with a selflessness that is both refreshing and disconcerting. Gerald Stern is a commanding presence in contemporary poetry, the evidence of which lies in this collection

Throughout Save the Last Dance, Gerald Stern writes with a selflessness that is both refreshing and disconcerting. His work is absolutely concerned with his subject and the moment in which it exists. As a result, the reader will feast on the imagery employed and the devotion evident in Stern’s writing. Gerald Stern is a commanding presence in contemporary poetry, the evidence of which lies in this collection.

Stern reads several poems from his 2008 collection Save the Last Dance, explaining their literary and autobiographical references. Stern asserts that he often writes from his own subconscious; he begins with whatever situation he is in and associates freely from there

Stern reads several poems from his 2008 collection Save the Last Dance, explaining their literary and autobiographical references. Stern asserts that he often writes from his own subconscious; he begins with whatever situation he is in and associates freely from there. At one point in the interview, Stern reads one of his most widely anthologized poems, "The Dancing," and discusses how readers have responded to it. Age 83 at the time of this interview, Stern observes that he is as active as ever, reading, writing, traveling, and giving readings.

The fifteenth collection by a celebrated poet whose "terrific, boisterous energy has never flagged" (Megan Harlan, San Francisco Chronicle).

In Save the Last Dance, Gerald Stern gives us a stunning collection of his intimately personal―yet always universal, and always surprising―poems, rich with humor and insight. Shorter lyric poems in the first two parts continue the satirical and often redemptive vision of his last collection, Everything Is Burning, while never failing to carve out new emotional territory. In the third part, a long poem called "The Preacher," Stern takes the book of Ecclesiastes as a starting point for a meditation on loss, futility, and emptiness, represented here by the concept of a "hole" that resurfaces throughout.

Nern
Jerry Stern has been writing poems for over 40 years and is recognized as one of the country's best. This collection continues his stellar path. I had the honor of knowing him in the mid-60's when he taught at a small college in Western Pa. I highly recommend his books to anyone who likes humor, pathos and something that makes you think twice, because he makes you do that in his work.
Maldarbaq
With all due respect to any writer, especially one who has been around as long as Stern, but this was pretty much crap. To each his own, but if after 87 poetic years on this planet, this is what you can produce, then eh... All the pieces are basically run on sentences, no punctuations,(even though its not always needed) and streams of thought with no real direction. I know people like this sorta stuff and its popular to write this way today but its crap, thats it. Most contemporary poetry is a tragedy to the ear and murder on the heart. All his poems sounded like HS teenagers talking, starting a conversation and never taking a breadth and going from idea to idea. Its not poetry and at best bad prose. I'll try some of his earlier works and see if there was any merit there. But this later stuff...eh...
Doriel
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