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by Charles Simic
Download The Voice at 3:00 A.M.: Selected Late and New Poems fb2
Poetry
  • Author:
    Charles Simic
  • ISBN:
    0151008426
  • ISBN13:
    978-0151008421
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harcourt; 1 edition (April 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1588 kb
  • ePUB format
    1625 kb
  • DJVU format
    1379 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    362
  • Formats:
    txt rtf mbr lrf


Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Voice at 3:00 .

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Selected Late and New Poems as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Charles Simic's writing comes dancing out on the balls of its feet, colloquially fit as a fiddle, a sparring partner for . Simic describes that something which makes itself felt at 3am, or the woods after dark, or an abandoned wooden church, with uncanny precision.

Charles Simic's writing comes dancing out on the balls of its feet, colloquially fit as a fiddle, a sparring partner for the world. Few poets have been as influential-or as inimitable-as Charles Simic. Simic's poems confront that something which is neither angel or demon without fear or judgment. His equanimity turns to humor in instances like "The Voice at 3am", which simply contains the lines, "Who put canned laughter /into my crucifix scene?"

The Voice at 3:00 . Selected Late and New Poems. Chosen as one of the New York Library's 25 Books to Remember for 2003, The Voice at 3:00 A. M. was also nominated for a National Book Award.

The Voice at 3:00 . The recipient of many prizes, Simic most recently received Canada's Griffin Prize. The poems in this collection-spanning two decades of his work-present a rich and varied survey of a remarkable lyrical journey. In the Street Beauty, dark goddess, We met and parted As though we parted not. Like two stopped watches In a dusty store window, One golden morning of time.

Charles Simic, The Voice at 3:00 . My advice, wait for the paperback

2003: The Voice at 3:00 . Mark Ford (Spring 2005).

2003: The Voice at 3:00 . 2004: Selected Poems: 1963–2003, 2004 (winner of the 2005 International Griffin Poetry Prize). 2005: Aunt Lettuce, I Want to Peek under Your Skirt (illustrated by Howie Michels). Profile and poems of Charles Simic, including audio files, at the Poetry Foundation. Profile and poems written and audio at Poetry Archive. org biography, poems written and audio.

Charles Simic has been widely celebrated for his brilliant poetic imagery; his social, political, and moral .

Chosen as one of the New York Library's 25 Books to Remember for 2003, The Voice at 3:00 A. was.

from THE VOICE AT 3:00 . Charles Simic has been widely celebrated for his brilliant poetic imagery; his social, political, and moral alertness; his uncanny ability to make the ordinary extraordinary; and not least, the sardonic humor all his own. Gathering much of his material fr. A Wedding in Hell. In this new collection of sixty-two poems Charles Simic paints exquisite and shattering word pictures that lend meaning to a chaotic world populated by insects, bridal veils, pallbearers, TV sets, parrots, and a finely detailed dragonfly. Suffused with ho. Hotel Insomnia.

Charles Simic has been widely celebrated for his brilliant poetic imagery; his social, political, and moral alertness; his .

Charles Simic is widely recognized as one of the most visceral and unique poets writing today. His work has won numerous awards, among them the 1990 Pulitzer Prize, a MacArthur Foundation genius grant, the Griffin International Poetry Prize, the Wallace Stevens Award, and the appointment as US poet laureate.

Charles Simic has been widely celebrated for his brilliant poetic imagery; his social, political, and moral alertness; his uncanny ability to make the ordinary extraordinary; and not least, a sardonic humor all his own. Gathering much of his material from the seemingly mundane minutia of contemporary American culture, Simic matches meditations on spiritual concerns and the weight of history with a nimble wit, shifting effortlessly to moments of clear vision and intense poetic revelation. The poems in this collection--spanning two decades of his work--present a rich and varied survey of a remarkable lyrical journey.

Hugighma
My poetry professor Don Revell once said that a line is a full idea, and a line break should indicate a new idea, not the continuation of the previous one. I have never seen anyone use the line so masterfully as Charles Simic. His turns of phrase are so dazzling and lyrical, you wonder how a poem could possibly have so many tricks up its sleeve. Every line is a revelation, taking you places you would never expect, and he makes it look so effortless and right. The endings of his poems are especially magical, as they usually end with a totally mundane observation, but because of the journey of the poem, makes it seem profound. The long poem, "Talking to the Ceiling" epitomizes Simic's style of justapositions.

Father of the universe, what wine do you sip?
With tiny love bites, she ate my heart.
Didn't want the salt and pepper I offered.
Long hours of the night; St. John of the Cross
And Blaise Pascal the cops in a patrol car.
Do you have a favorite black hole in heaven?

I also appreciate Simic's ability to take us to dark places, without being dark. In Sunday Papers, the poem begins with "The butchery of the innocent never stops. that's about all we can ever be sure of, love, even than the roast you are bringing out of the oven." The massacre of innocents is juxtaposed with a mundane, domestic act. Both of them are predictable, one made horrifying by being equated with something so unremarkable. Yet the "outstretched hand smelling of garlic and rosemary" is also made fragile in the comparison, as if the speaker was saying, even that could easily come to an end.

In "Something Large is In the Woods" an ominous atmosphere is created with "the branches beat against the house to be let in, and then change their minds abruptly." Simic describes that something which makes itself felt at 3am, or the woods after dark, or an abandoned wooden church, with uncanny precision. Simic's poems confront that something which is neither angel or demon without fear or judgment. His equanimity turns to humor in instances like "The Voice at 3am", which simply contains the lines, "Who put canned laughter /into my crucifix scene?" In this way Simic's poetry opens up the gaps in the patchwork of ordinary reality and lets us glimpse the darkness underneath. It is neither a heaven or hell that Simic reveals, but the comedy of the nonsensical universe that Simic relishes with existential flair.
Fesho
All poets have their own way to mourn the passing of time, said Charles Simic in a recent interview. Simic’s way, as this collection of poems shows magnificently, is peculiar, unique in a good sense.

“All it's provisory, short-lived kisses and enchantments”.

“Spirit, you who are everywhere and nowhere, Watch over the lost lamb, Now that the mouth of the infinite, Open over us, And its dumb tongue begins to move quickly”.

“Do you have a favorite black hole in heaven? The fleeting moments know no care.”

We all grope around in the dark, wrote Simic some time ago. Fortunately we all have his poems helping us cope with the ephemeral. They are, and I do not fear sounding trite, life-saving prayers for the incredulous.
Orll
The first time I read this book, I enjoyed it a lot. By my third reading, with everything that had unfolded from subsequent readings, I had learned a lot about how easy some pieces seemed, but how deliberately constructed they were. An amazing work!
Xig
Simic is always fine. A poet of atmosphere, evocative, palpable images. A poet of situation and irony with a finely honed sense of the language. The voices he hears are the voices we hear after he tells us they are there to hear!
Exellent
This is a wonderful book of poems, full of selections from most of Simic's major books of poetry. Some of this selection does not include a lot of poems from his very early books which is unfortunate.

Many of these poems will dazzle and excite. He has a keen eye for the weird and the sublime alike.
Dddasuk
simic never disappoints
Hanelynai
It was recommended by Billy Collins. I enjoyed it but not all of it, but I can see why heliked it so much./
A strong collection by Simic that I recently re-read, it show cases his eye for the surreal in the mundane, his gallows humor, and his ability to make the seeming banal fantastic. His dry, direct, and compact verse works well here, although the collection does seem long for Simic's style. This collection covers his mid-80s to early 2000s work with representative poems. It is good as an introduction to Simic but should be read more by flipping and perusing than plowing straight through.