Download Everyday Eclipses fb2

by Roger McGough
Download Everyday Eclipses fb2
Poetry
  • Author:
    Roger McGough
  • ISBN:
    067091262X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0670912629
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Viking; 1st Edition edition (March 7, 2002)
  • Pages:
    80 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1259 kb
  • ePUB format
    1880 kb
  • DJVU format
    1856 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    840
  • Formats:
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Everyday Eclipses By Roger McGough.

For shameless surrealism, embrace "My Divine Juggler" (which McGough premiered when only partly finished on BBC radio 4's "Fine Lines" in February 2001

For shameless surrealism, embrace "My Divine Juggler" (which McGough premiered when only partly finished on BBC radio 4's "Fine Lines" in February 2001. Now finished, the poem is an absolute scream!). If you have the chance to hear the Poet deliver 'LIVE' any of these and more, don't hesitate.

But oh, what lousy timing, how could anybody guess Your career as a poet would last on hour or less. Yes, it would have been marvellous, it would have been splendid If you hadn't had it published on the day the world ended. from On Having a First Book of Poetry Published (The day the world ended). The World's Wife by Carol Ann Duffy.

Roger McGough was born in Litherland, Lancashire on the outskirts . Everyday Eclipses, Viking, 2002. Collected Poems, Viking, 2003

Roger McGough was born in Litherland, Lancashire on the outskirts of Liverpool, to Roger Francis, a docker, and Mary (McGarry) McGough. His ancestry is Irish and he was raised in the Roman Catholic faith. He was a pupil at St Mary's College in Crosby with Laurie Taylor, future sociologist and criminologist, before going on to study French. Collected Poems, Viking, 2003. That Awkward Age, Penguin, 2009.

Out of the frying pan, the tossed pancake orbits the Chinese lampshade. Everyday eclipses another day. Goodbye bald patch, hello yarmulke. The water bucket echoing into the well, well, well. A sombrero tossed into the bullring. Leading the parade, the big bass drum. We hear cymbals but cannot see them. One eclipse eclipses another eclipse. To the cold, white face, the oxygen mask. One death eclipses another death. The baby's head, the mother's breast. The open O of the mouth seeking the warm O of the nipple. One birth eclipses another birth.

Roger McGough's eagerly-awaited new collection is a powerful testament to the miraculous in the everyday. Here he builds us his world: one of chance encounters and embarrassing moments, of big questions and small wonders

Roger McGough's eagerly-awaited new collection is a powerful testament to the miraculous in the everyday. Here he builds us his world: one of chance encounters and embarrassing moments, of big questions and small wonders. At that awkward age now between birth and death,' he addresses Alzheimers and wrestles with mortality.

Roger McGough's new book of poems contains his own unique spin on innocence and experience: here are poems about his docker father and his new young daughter, poems about how, in his dreams, he gave the idea of "Hey Jude" to McCartney and advised Dylan to go electric, poems about jugglers and human cannonballs, poems about sad music and the sad eclipses of everyday life.