Download Purgatorio fb2

by Dante Alighieri
Download Purgatorio fb2
Poetry
  • Author:
    Dante Alighieri
  • ISBN:
    0451615670
  • ISBN13:
    978-0451615671
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Signet (November 1, 1961)
  • Subcategory:
    Poetry
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1571 kb
  • ePUB format
    1779 kb
  • DJVU format
    1143 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    372
  • Formats:
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The Divine Comedy of Dante - Purgatory, Translated by . The Divine Comedy of Dante - Purgatory Are the firm statutes of the dread abyss. Of liberty he journeys: that how dear.

The Divine Comedy of Dante - Purgatory, Translated by . Broken, or in high heaven new laws ordain’d

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Book 2 of 3 in the Divine Comedy Series. No other version offers anything close to what we find gathered here in one volume. Robert Harrison, Professor of Italian, Stanford University.

Purgatorio is the second part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno, and preceding the Paradiso. The poem was written in the early 14th century

Purgatorio is the second part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno, and preceding the Paradiso. The poem was written in the early 14th century. It is an allegory telling of the climb of Dante up the Mount of Purgatory, guided by the Roman poet Virgil, except for the last four cantos at which point Beatrice takes over as Dante's guide

Purgatorio Purgatory (The Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri Purgatory (Italian: Purgatorio) is the second part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno, and preceding the Paradiso. The poem was written in the early 14th century

Purgatorio Purgatory (The Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri Purgatory (Italian: Purgatorio) is the second part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno, and preceding the Paradiso. It is an allegory telling of the climb of Dante up the Mount of Purgatory, guided by the Roman poet Virgil, except for the last four cantos at which point Beatrice takes over as Dante's guide.

Purgatorio: Canto 1. Dante Alighieri. Featuring Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Permit us through thy sevenfold realm to go; I will take back this grace from thee to her, If to be mentioned there below thou deignest. Album Purgatorio (Longfellow Translation). Purgatorio: Canto 1 Lyrics. Marcia so pleasing was unto mine eyes While I was on the other side," then said he, "That every grace she wished of me I granted; Now that she dwells beyond the evil river, She can no longer move me, by that law Which, when I issued forth from there, was made.

Purgatorio is the second part of The Divine Comedy, Dante's epic poem describing man's progress from hell to paradise.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Purgatorio is the second part of The Divine Comedy, Dante's epic poem describing man's progress from hell to paradise. Having escaped the Inferno, Dante and his guide, the classical Roman poet Virgil, ascend out of the underworld to the Mountain of Purgatory on an island on the far side of the world. The mountain has nine terraces, seven of which correspond to the seven deadly sins, and two of which constitute an Ante-Purgatory with the Garden of Eden at the summit.

Riassunto - Letteratura Italiana - Lettera di Petrarca a Boccaccio su Dante (Familiares XXI,15). 2Pages: 1year: 16/17.

Durante di Alighiero degli Alighieri, commonly known by his pen name Dante Alighieri or simply as Dante (/ˈdɑːnteɪ, ˈdænteɪ, ˈdænti/, also US: /ˈdɑːnti/, Italian: ; c. 1265 – 1321), was an Italian poet.

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Gaudiker
this book is excellent vibrant cover and rather easy to read. Highly recommended book for anyone that appreciates the classics
Tamesya
"To run o'er better waters hoists its sail/The little vessel of my genius now,/That leaves behind itself a sea so cruel..."

Having finished his tour of hell and its residents, Dante Alighieri turns his attention to a more cheerful (if less juicy) supernatural realm. "Purgatorio" is less famous than its predecessor, but it's still a beautiful piece of work that explores the mindset not of the damned, but of sinners who are undergoing a divine cleansing -- beautiful, hopeful and a little sad.

Outside of Hell, Dante and Virgil encounter a small boat piloted by an angel and filled with human souls -- and unlike the damned, they're eager to find "the mountain." And as Hell had circles of damnation, Purgatory has terraces that the redeemable souls climb on their way towards Heaven, and none of the people there will leave their terrace until they are cleansed.

And the sins that are cleansed here are the seven deadly ones: the proud, the envious, the wrathful, the greedy, the lazy, the gluttonous, and the lustful. But as Dante moves slowly through the terraces, he finds himself gaining a new tour guide as he approaches Heaven...

I'll say this openly: the second part of the "Divine Comedy" is simply not as deliciously entertaining as "Inferno" -- it was kind of fun to see Dante skewering the corrupt people of his time, and describing the sort of grotesque punishments they merited. But while not as fun, "Purgatorio" is a more transcendent, hopeful kind of story since all the souls there will eventually be cleansed and make their way to Heaven.

As a result, "Purgatorio" is filled with a kind of eager anticipation -- there's flowers, stars, dancing, angelic ferrymen, mythic Grecian rivers and an army of souls who are all-too-eager to get to Purgatory so their purification can start. Alighieri's timeless poetry has a silken quality, from beginning to end ("Here let death's poetry arise to life!/O Muses sacrosanct whose liege I am/and let Calliope rise up and play") and it's crammed with classical references and Christian symbolism (the Sun's part in advancing the soiled souls).

And the trip through Purgatory seems to have a strong effect on Dante's self-insert, who appears less repulsed and more fascinated by what he sees there. It's hard not to feel sorry for him when the paternal Virgil exits the Comedy, but at least he has someone else appears to guide him.

What's more, this particular edition is good for people acquainted with fairly ye olde language. Longfellow's translation is lovely and has a beautifully antique flavor, but it isn't a good one for newbies.

The middle part of the Divine Comedy isn't as juicy as "Inferno," but the beauty of Dante Alighieri's writing makes up for it."Purgatorio" is a must read... and then on to Paradise.
Nuadador
Simone's translation is both true to the original text and yet understandable. His annotations, foot notes, and introductions to every canto provide a theological, philosophical, and historical context for the entire work. Would recommend.
Castiel
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Dante. I really liked this translation, and the explanations of passages and people at the end of the cantos are extremely helpful.