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Download Seven for a Secret (Volume 1 of 2) (EasyRead Super Large 20pt Edition) fb2

by Mary Reed
Download Seven for a Secret (Volume 1 of 2) (EasyRead Super Large 20pt Edition) fb2
  • Author:
    Mary Reed
  • ISBN:
    1458731189
  • ISBN13:
    978-1458731180
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    ReadHowYouWant; Large Print edition (November 11, 2009)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1953 kb
  • ePUB format
    1380 kb
  • DJVU format
    1840 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    812
  • Formats:
    mobi docx lit rtf


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Lord Chamberlain John spends his days counseling Emperor Justinian while passing the small hours of night in conversation with the solemn-eyed little girl depicted in a mosaic on his study wall

Lord Chamberlain John spends his days counseling Emperor Justinian while passing the small hours of night in conversation with the solemn-eyed little girl depicted in a mosaic on his study wall. He never expected to meet her in a public square or afterwards find her red-dyed corpse in a subterranean cistern.

for a Secret Mary Reed & Eric Mayer ww. ome. She paused and pushed her veil aside just for an instant, long enough for me to confirm that what she said was the truth.

Seven for a Secret Seven for a Secret Mary Reed & Eric Mayer ww. Don’t you recognize me, Lord Chamberlain? I am Zoe! Chapter Two. If she really was the girl in the mosaic, John, it appears she’s not going to get down off the wall this morning. Anatolius looked away from the square and squinted up in the direction of the stylite’s column.

Find nearly any book by Mary Reed (page 2). Get the best . Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Four for a Boy (John the Eunuch Mysteries).

Chapter One. For once, the girl in the wall mosaic did not reply to the Lord Chamberlain’s question. The all but unfurnished room was large enough to house several working families and the cunning mosaic must have cost the former occupant of the place-a long since deposed tax collector-more than a laborer could earn in years. You say nothing now, Zoe, John muttered, but I expect you will explain it all to me eventually. Perhaps even that strange tattoo on your wrist. In truth, while conversing with the mosaic girl, John often managed to explain puzzles to himself.

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Lord Chamberlain John spends his days counseling Emperor Justinian while passing the small hours of night in conversation with the solemn-eyed little girl depicted in a mosaic on his study wall. He never expected to meet her in a public square or afterwards find her red-dyed corpse in a subterranean cistern. Had the mysterious woman truly been the model for the mosaic years before as she claimed? Why had she sought John out? Who wanted her dead - and why? The answers seem to lie among the denizens of the smoky streets of the quarter of Constantinople known as the Copper Market, where artisans, beggars, prostitutes, pillar saints, and exiled aristocrats struggle to survive within sight of the Great Palace. In his investigations, John encounters a faded actress, a patriotic sausage maker, a sundial maker who fears the sun, a religious visionary, a man who lives in a treasure trove, and a beggar who owes his life to a cartload of melons. Before long he suspects he is attempting to unravel not just a murder but a plot against the empire. Is there such a thing as truth in a place where people live on memories, dreams, and illusions? If so, can John push aside the shadows?

Rageseeker
The murder of a woman who offered John information and may have been the model for his beloved mosaic girl Zoe sends him digging for a possible revolutionary cabal.

As always, the cynical and convoluted storyline kept me reading, although I found many of the characters rather unlikable. There were some unexplained touches, like a character staring at John with hatred at the end of the book. And there were a few discoveries that strained credulity. But overall, an enjoyable entry in this series. Reed and Mayer explained their titling in one of John's musings. Spelling, grammar, and formatting were all acceptable, as I expect from Poisoned Pen Press.

A brief note on star ratings: I liked this book very much, and 4 stars is a positive recommendation from me. But I reserve 5-star ratings for truly exceptional books, that grip me while reading and haunt me afterwards, and this book simply did not reach that level. It's a good read from a solid writing team and professional publisher, and you won't waste your money if you buy it.
Ballazan
Take a look at the wonderful cover of this book, and consider this quote from Ezra Pound: "The eyes of this dead lady speak to me." That's John the Eunuch's experience, too: the Lord Chamberlain to Justinian and the toxic Empress Theodora has found a safe and reliable confidante in the mosaic portrait of a girl he calls Zoë. Through the first six books in this series, Zoë--more than just a picture on a study wall-- has become real to the reader as well. So imagine how disconcerted John is to run into a young woman who claims to be the model for Zoë-- and how even more disconcerted he is to find her painted red and floating in an underground cistern, quite dead.

Finding the truth about Zoë becomes first a quest and then something of an obsession with John, and obsessive quests seldom go smoothly. As always, authors Reed and Mayer weave a fund of information about religion, politics, and life in Byzantium and a vivid cast of characters into a story that will draw you in and leave you thinking. John's servant Peter, his beloved Cornelia, and his conflicted excubitor friend Felix (among others) are real and plausible to a 21st-century reader, yet consistently true to the understandings and assumptions of their time and station. And anyone who remembers their college days can probably call to mind a pedantic poet....

One definition of a good mystery is that it leaves the reader in dialog with the characters even after the book ends. Using that definition, after the strong and poignant ending of this story, I still have a few choice words for Theodora. I join other reviewers in hoping that there will be many more chances to enter the world of John the Eunuch.
Kashicage
The writing is wonderful: atmosphere, settings, character interactions. Each book is more enjoyable than the one before.
Vareyma
Unlike most high ranking government officials, John lives a relatively austere life. He lives with his lady and one servant. His modest home once belonged to a tax collector. On the wall of the study the tax collector had commissioned a beautiful mosaic.

Depicted in the mosaic is a young girl, the daughter of the tax collector. John calls her Zoe. When he has a difficult problem to solve, John talks to the enigmatic girl in the mosaic.

Then one day, a woman reveals that she is Zoe, the tax collector's daughter. But before John has a chance to talk more with her, he finds her murdered body.

So, John begins investigating her death. He soon learns that intrigue and rumor run rampant through out the palace. Parts of his life, which he thought were personal, are widely known by many.

Soon John's investigations lead him to plots which endanger him, his family, and the empire itself.

What will John discover as he tries to find justice for Zoe?

The setting of Constantinople in the waning days of the Roman Empire makes this series a unique read. John's position as one of the most powerful people in the empire definitely aids his investigations. In my opinion, John is a great character who uses his power wisely in the pursuit of justice.

I enjoyed this novel. It is a great addition to a unique and interesting series. I'll be reading the next book in the series soon.
Tetaian
For years, John, Lord Camberlain in the service of Emperor Justinian, has solved his problems by talking to the mosaic on his office wall. Zoe has never answered back, but her silent gaze has helped him. Never answered back, that is, until now. John is approached by a woman who claims to be the mysterious Zoe. Before they can meet, however, John discover's the woman's murdered body.

The plague that recently hit Constantinople has faded, but there are plenty of other problems for a Lord Chamberlain to deal with... including constant plotting against the Emperor and his controversial wife, Theodora. As he investigates the murder, John runs into a number of disgruntled former officials, the author Procopius (who wrote 'The Secret Histories' detailing scandals of the Byzantine court), and learns that Zoe was actually Agnes, daughter of a disgraced former official.

When John is attacked on the streets and his family threatened, he concludes that the murder is not an isolated event but somehow connected to a plot against the throne. The one rumor that seems both everywhere and constantly denied is that Theodora had a son before marrying Justinian and that this son is somewhere in the city.

Authors Mary Reed and Eric Mayer continue their charming 'John the Eunuch' series with a story set amongst the depravity of the court, the ongoing religious conflict among Christian factions and between these factions and residual paganism and mostly-soldier followers of Mithra. John's investigation among the mosaic-makers, antiquities-dealers, eunuchs and court officials, actors and nunneries of Constantinople paint a vivid picture of this cosmopolitan city at a time when it seemed that perhaps the Roman Empire could be recreated with Constantinople, New Rome, at its center.