Download The Broken Citadel fb2

by Joyce Gregorian
Download The Broken Citadel fb2
  • Author:
    Joyce Gregorian
  • ISBN:
    0441080995
  • ISBN13:
    978-0441080991
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ace Books (January 1, 1983)
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1299 kb
  • ePUB format
    1315 kb
  • DJVU format
    1958 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    938
  • Formats:
    docx lrf doc mobi


The Broken Citadel introduces the heroine Sibby as a spunky and sensitive child. The book is illustrated with graphic designs by Gregorian herself, depicting the playing cards used in her book to predict the future.

The Broken Citadel introduces the heroine Sibby as a spunky and sensitive child. Sibby, steps through a broken window from the world of Massachusetts into another world, Tredana, in which things are not always what they seem - including herself. The world is a heady blend of European and Middle Eastern culture, in which the rich past of by-gone temples, kingdoms and religions is symbolized by the broken citadel.

The Broken Citadel book. I've read this book in german translation, but even so I just loved it. I think Joyce Ballou Gregorian creates a world like Tolkien and . In the Otherworld, change was afoot. The winds whistled through. Lewis had done before, but completely different to other fantasy-countries.

Gregorian's book is a multi-layered gem, in which her young heroine's greatest gift is her empathy and caring for others, and the courage to be true to her own heart.

Joyce Ballou Gregorian Hampshire (July 5, 1946 – April 29, 1991) was an American author, expert on Oriental rugs, and horse breeder. Joyce Ballou Gregorian was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the third child of Phebe Ballou, of New England descent and the noted oriental rug dealer and expert Arthur T. Gregorian, an Armenian immigrant. She graduated from Beaver Country Day School in 1963. She attended the University of Edinburgh for one year and graduated with honors from Radcliffe College in 1968

by. Gregorian, Joyce Ballou. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

by. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on December 3, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

February 1984 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

She broke off, gazing at him quizzically. I think I see how the system works, Miss Page.

Born in Cardross, Scotland, A. J. Cronin studied at the University of Glasgow. In 1916 he served as a surgeon sub-lieutenant in the Royal Navy Volunteers Reserve, and at the war’s end he completed his medical studies and practiced in South Wales. He was later appointed to the Ministry of Mines, studying the medical problems of the mining industry. She broke off, gazing at him quizzically.

ISBN 10: 0441080995 ISBN 13: 9780441080991. Publisher: Ace Books, 1983.

Level: advanced Genre: novel Length: longest. Chapter one - The New Doctor. Chapter second - Fever. Chapter three - The Sewer. Chapter four - A Visit to the School. Chapter five - Christine. Chapter six - Curing a 'Madman'.

Brought to a strange world where strength of mind and spirit are constantly required of her, Sibby finds friends, adventure, and a sense of belonging.

Hugifyn
I read this book when I was 10 years old (I am now 40) and I never forgot it. When my niece turned 11 I searched and searched for this book to give it to her on her birthday. I finally found this "like new" copy on Amazon. I guess this book is out of print now because I could not find any new copies. The story of Sibby is one that every girl should read. It is a beautifully written story of a young girl's loyalty, strength and courage to do the right thing. This gem belongs on the shelf next to The Chronicles of Narnia.
Zololmaran
It's great and it showed up quickly.
Hasirri
I don't know why the Tredana Trilogy is still out of print. With the increasing popularity of epic fantasy fiction with female lead characters (i.e. the Outlander series, the Twilight series, and the entirety of the "paranormal romance" genre...) I would think this series would have reemerged by now. This series recounts the adventures of eleven-year-old Sibby, a Massachusetts fifth-grader who enters through a window in an abandoned Victorian house and finds herself transported into an alternate, magical world. The 3 books in the series follow her as she grows up in this world and the alternate world of Tredana: The Broken Citadel (book 1), Castledown (book 2), and The Great Wheel (book 3, the final book in the trilogy).
blodrayne
I don't know why the Tredana Trilogy is still out of print. With the increasing popularity of epic fantasy fiction with female lead characters (i.e. the Outlander series, the Twilight series, and the entirety of the "paranormal romance" genre...) I would think this series would have reemerged by now. This series recounts the adventures of eleven-year-old Sibby, a Massachusetts fifth-grader who enters through a window in an abandoned Victorian house and finds herself transported into an alternate, magical world. The 3 books in the series follow her as she grows up in this world and the alternate world of Tredana: The Broken Citadel (book 1), Castledown (book 2), and The Great Wheel (book 3, the final book in the trilogy).
Thordigda
I was thirteen when I read _The Broken Citadel_. I'm 40, now. It hasn't lost its compelling beauty, although I've read it numerous times in the 27 intervening years. The abandoned house with the stained glass window and its door into magic still haunts my day dreams and my night dreams.
"Misfit child finds place in magical world" is a very common trope for YA fantasy, partly because it is so seductive for a misfit child with a streak of escapism. _The Broken Citadel_, however, satisfies not only the passions of a teenaged girl wanting to flee imminent adulthood, but the woman she will grow into. Gregorian has an intense compassion for that girl with an adult's insight.
The world and the story are compelling. Gregorian's world has the lights and shadows of a real place, complexities that many YA fantasy novels eschew for fear of confusing child readers. The whole glows like a stained glass window at sunset. Not only is there magic in the world, but the experience of reading it is magical.
This is a book that anyone who likes fantasy is likely to enjoy.
Agarus
Gregorian's book is a multi-layered gem, in which her young heroine's greatest gift is her empathy and caring for others, and the courage to be true to her own heart. I first read this book in 1978, and is it still my favorite fantasy, both because of the strength of Gregorian's writing, and because it is part of a unique trilogy that tells the story of its heroine as a young girl (The Broken Citadel), as a young woman (Castledown), and as a woman in her 30's (The Great Wheel).
The Broken Citadel introduces the heroine Sibby as a spunky and sensitive child. The book is illustrated with graphic designs by Gregorian herself, depicting the playing cards used in her book to predict the future.
Sibby, steps through a broken window from the world of Massachusetts into another world, Tredana, in which things are not always what they seem - including herself. The world is a heady blend of European and Middle Eastern culture, in which the rich past of by-gone temples, kingdoms
and religions is symbolized by the broken citadel. Using desert warriors, dying priests, dragons and phoenixes clad in their own unique cultural context, Gregorian manages to evoke potent archetypes without falling into cliche, as so many mass market fantasies do.
Sibby joins a questing prince, Leron, and his friends, who seek to rescue the princess Dastra from her tower, where she has been hidden by her mother, the power-hungry Simirimia. Simirimia was once worshiped with her sister Rianna as part of the Double Goddess in Ornat, but she cast down her sister and the temple in exchange for greater power. Now Simirimia threatens Tredana itself.
But nothing is precisely as it seems. In Tredana, Sibby discovers, nobility of the spirit matters more than nobility in name, although the former is much rarer than the latter.
invincible
"The Broken Citadel" was my favorite book out of the series because I was around Sibby's age in the book when I first started reading it and it was so wonderful to read about her adventures. 12 is an awkward, confusing age. It seems like you belong in any other world than the one your in, and to actually read about a girl who finds the place where she really belongs... it was awesome. I loved the cliffhanger endings. They're what kept me searching for the "The Greath Wheel" for almost ten years. I'm a huge Gregorian fan. ...
First of all, I must say that since I am the niece of Joyce Gregorian, my review is somewhat biased. The Broken Citadel was my aunt's first attempt at writing children's fantasy fiction. After little Sibby steps through a broken window in an abandoned house she is whisked away to an alternate universe based on our Middle Eastern and Bedouin worlds. Sibby is a gutsy little girl who steps into a quest to save a princess, a battle with an ice queen, and an infatuation with a desert leader. Joyce intentionally wrote a complex and adult story for mature children, but sadly Athenaum never quite knew how to market it. Any child who rereads the Narnia Chronicles over and over under the covers at night will enjoy The Broken Citadel, Castledown, and The Great Wheel.