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by Ronald Black,John Gregorson Campbell
Download The Gaelic Otherworld: Superstitions Of The Highlands And Islands Of Scotland And Witchcraft & Second Sight In The Highlands & Islands fb2
Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Author:
    Ronald Black,John Gregorson Campbell
  • ISBN:
    1841582077
  • ISBN13:
    978-1841582078
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Birlinn Ltd; First Scottish Edition edition (May 30, 2005)
  • Pages:
    753 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1102 kb
  • ePUB format
    1291 kb
  • DJVU format
    1527 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    530
  • Formats:
    lrf azw rtf docx


For an in depth treatment of Scottish superstition, it's difficult to see where this book could be better. The writings of J. G. Campbell (and J. F. Cambell) are what the other books draw upon. Without these works, the beliefs and superstitions of the Scots would be lost forever.

John Gregorson Campbell (1836-91) was one of a number of outstanding folklorists who collected and published the traditions of their native Highlands and Islands during the second half of the nineteenth century and the first.

John Gregorson Campbell (1836-91) was one of a number of outstanding folklorists who collected and published the traditions of their native Highlands and Islands during the second half of the nineteenth century and the first few years of the twentieth. In addition to a trail-blazing introduction which places these Highland beliefs firmly in their social context.

second compilation of Gregorson Campbell's collection of myths, Clan Traditions and Popular Tales of the Western Highlands and Islands, published in 1895

second compilation of Gregorson Campbell's collection of myths, Clan Traditions and Popular Tales of the Western Highlands and Islands, published in 1895 Richard Dorson, American author and director of the Folklore Institute at Indiana University, describes Gregorson Campbell as worthy of a "front rank among Celtic folklorists" and Sophia Kingshill, author an. .

The Gaelic Otherworld book. This volume contains two works by John Gregorson Campbell on the Scottish Gaelic tradition, 'Superstitions of the Highlands & Islands of Scotland' and 'Witchcraft & Second Sight in the Highlands & Islands of Scotland'.

By John Gregorson Campbell, Ronald Black This 'second otherworld' is the simplest of the three. It is the abode of the dead and of omens of death.

By John Gregorson Campbell, Ronald Black. John Gregorson Campbell (1834-91), a Gaelic speaker from Appin who spent his life as minister of Tiree, was one of a number of outstanding folklorists working in Scotland during the second half of the nineteenth century. Based on materials which he had gathered in the 1850s and 1860s, his Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and Witchcraft and Second Sight in the Highlands and Islands were published posthumously in 1900 and 1902. This 'second otherworld' is the simplest of the three.

Black, Ronald (2005), "Introduction", The Gaelic Otherworld: John Gregorson Campbell's Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and Witchcraft and Second Sight in the Highlands and Islands, Birlinn – via Questia Online Library. Eberly, Susan Schoon (1988), "Fairies and the Folklore of Disability: Changelings, Hybrids and the Solitary Fairy", Folklore, Taylor and Francis, 99 (1), JSTOR 1259568. Saxby, Jessie (1932), Shetland Traditional Lore, Edinburgh, Grant & Murray, ASIN: B000O9XQ6M.

John Gregorson Campbell became minister of Tiree in 1861 and faithfully served the people of that island for the rest . Ronald Black was until recently Senior Lecturer in Celtic at Edinburgh University

John Gregorson Campbell became minister of Tiree in 1861 and faithfully served the people of that island for the rest of his life. His appointment to the parish was against the wishes of the congregation, probably because they knew of, and disapproved of, his very unhealthy interest in superstitions, witchcraft and second sight. Ronald Black was until recently Senior Lecturer in Celtic at Edinburgh University.

John Gregorson Campbell (1836-91) was one of a number of folklorists who collected and published the traditions of his native Highlands and Islands during the second half of the 19th century and the first few years of the 20th. He was the only one of the group who specialized in the area of superstitions. Much of the material presented in this work was collected during the 1850s - an early date which happens to be one of the two reasons for its value to us today as a record of genuine tradition.

John Gregorson Campbell. J. MacLehose and sons. Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Book from the collections of. University of Michigan.

Gregorson Campbell, John (2005), Black, Ronald (e., The Gaelic Otherworld: Superstitions of the Highlands and the Islands and Witchcraft and Second Sight in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, Birlinn, ISBN 978 1 84158 207 8 – via Questia Online Library., The Gaelic Otherworld: Superstitions of the Highlands and the Islands and Witchcraft and Second Sight in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, Birlinn, ISBN 978 1 84158 207 8 – via Questia Online Library, (Subscription required (help)) Cite uses deprecated parameter subscription (help).

John Gregorson Campbell (1836-91) was one of a number of outstanding folklorists who collected and published the traditions of their native Highlands and Islands during the second half of the nineteenth century and the first few years of the twentieth. In addition to a trail-blazing introduction which places these Highland beliefs firmly in their social context, Ronald Black provides substantial explanatory endnotes and a comprehensive new index, all of which allow The Gaelic Otherworld to take its proper place as a classic of world folklore.

Jusari
We can thank the editors and publishers of this book for bringing it to light. I'd say this rates with Carmina Gadelica and The Silver Bough as source material on Gaelic culture and magical lore. Black's introduction puts the provenance of the material in clear perspective. Even if the author's research has flaws, this is a fascinating collection. Those working to build new things from the lumber of 18th and 19th century Scots lore will find a trove of ideas.
Asyasya
Extensive collection of folklore and folk customs, this is a very important book that deserves a place on the book shelf of everyone interested in Gaelic (or general Celtic) traditions. Like the Carmina Gadelica and the Silver Bough, this gives a rare look into the daily spiritual practices of the region. If you're only buying two or three Gaelic books, this should be one of them.