» » Celtic Myth and Legend (A Newcastle Mythology Book)

Download Celtic Myth and Legend (A Newcastle Mythology Book) fb2

by Charles Squire
Download Celtic Myth and Legend (A Newcastle Mythology Book) fb2
Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Author:
    Charles Squire
  • ISBN:
    0878770305
  • ISBN13:
    978-0878770304
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Borgo Pr; First Edition edition (July 1975)
  • Pages:
    450 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1279 kb
  • ePUB format
    1661 kb
  • DJVU format
    1953 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    540
  • Formats:
    mobi doc rtf lrf


Part of the 'Myths and Legends' series published by Gresham in the early 20th century, 'Celtic Myth and Legend' is actually a reissue of a 1905 work, 'The Mythology of the British Islands'

Part of the 'Myths and Legends' series published by Gresham in the early 20th century, 'Celtic Myth and Legend' is actually a reissue of a 1905 work, 'The Mythology of the British Islands'. It differs from the rest of the Gresham series because it is a bit more scholarly (it actually has an adequate set of footnotes) and a bit more didactic.

Beginning with comic books, I have always been fascinated by the world of imagination and mythology. From Superman, I graduated to Greek myths and from there I eventually found my way to Celtic and Irish mythology, where I felt at home. The gods and heroes of Celtic mythology are not immortal although they have magical powers. They suffer and die tragically.

Celtic Myths and Legends book. A comprehensive study of Celtic mythology, legend, and poetry provides background information on the Celts, Ancient Britons, and Druids, and includes the tales of such noted figures as Cuchulain, Blodeuweek, Branwen, and Fenn.

Celtic Myth and Legend book. While this book is a little dry and probably dated in places it is very detailed in the names and places of celtic mythology. Yes, what we have is a book that explains everything and tells everything, unlike modern equivelants. Not a book to read too avidly, but certainly a useful reference.

The legends of ancient Britain retain a profound allure for readers around the world, assuring a warm reception for this introduction to the colorful pageant of Celtic myth

The legends of ancient Britain retain a profound allure for readers around the world, assuring a warm reception for this introduction to the colorful pageant of Celtic myth. Its wondrous tales range from the oft-told deeds of Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table to the less-familiar adventures of the mighty Finn and his Fenians, Ulster's Champions of the Red Branch, and other figures from the Gaelic pantheon.

Early Irish myths blend mythology and history by describing how Ireland was settled by different groups of Celtic . The legends are clearly rooted in Celtic mythology however, and references to Arthur appear in a number of ancient Welsh poems.

Early Irish myths blend mythology and history by describing how Ireland was settled by different groups of Celtic deities and humans. Filled with magic and excitement, the tales tell of battles between forces of light and darkness. Another famous romantic story of Celtic origin is that of Tristan and Isolde.

Celtic Myth and Legend (A Newcastle Mythology Book). Other Products from pangurban (View All). Carlo Maria Martini Sulle strade del Signore.

The Book of Celtic Myths: From the Mystic Might of the Celtic Warriors to the Magic . Celtic Myth and Legend - Charles Squire. Bibliographical Note. Celtic myth and legend, Charles Squire

The Book of Celtic Myths: From the Mystic Might of the Celtic Warriors to the Magic of the Fey Folk, the Storied History and Folklore of Ireland, Scotland, Brittany, and Wales. Celtic myth and legend, Charles Squire. p. cm. Originally published under title: The mythology of the British Islands.

Stephen Fry. 8,49 €. Irish Fairytales.

Books related to Celtic Myth and Legend. Stephen Fry.

Now back in print for the first time in many years is one of the most comprehensive studies of Celtic mythology legend and poetry ever written, presenting the entire enthralling panorama of the mythical and legendary traditions of the ancient Gaelic and British Celts.

Here, in clear, compact, readable form are stories of all the chief characters of Celtic myth: the Gaelic gods and the giants they battled; the "Champions of the Red Branch" of Ulster, heroes of the great "Irish Iliad;" Finn and the Fenians; and the gods and heroes of the ancient Britons, down through the great deeds of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table.

Here is a book that covers the entire spectrum of this fascinating area of folklore, with numerous illustrations. It is not a book for scholars only, but for anyone who is interested in the roots of many of the world's finest plays, poems, short stories and novels.


Gralsa
Beginning with comic books, I have always been fascinated by the world of imagination and mythology. From Superman, I graduated to Greek myths and from there I eventually found my way to Celtic and Irish mythology, where I felt at home. The gods and heroes of Celtic mythology are not immortal although they have magical powers. They suffer and die tragically. Charles Squires treatment of this world of magical salmon, pigs and the fey folks are tremendously satisfying. I especially love the Mabinogian and the story of the woman "made of flowers" who has no heart.
Kerdana
Another reviewer stated that this would make a good reference book. I would have to agree. I am of Scottish and Irish descent and am currently taking an interest in my ancestral origins. I picked this book up from the library as part of my research, but also because I find mythology to be fascinating.
The level of thought and research that went into this book is impressive. However, the vitality and archetypal potency of these myths is lost in this particular retelling. It is more of an academic history than a retelling, actually. I am still glad I took the chance to read it because it was a greatly detailed introduction to the Celtic Myth cycles. It never gave me that feeling of rapt fascination and awe that one has when hearing a good storyteller recall the stories of ancient gods, though.
So go ahead and read this if you wish to understand these myths from a very thick, academic standpoint, just don't expect Neil Gaiman or Joseph Campbell. I would also recommend reading it as a technical reference paired with a more potent, entertaining narrative.
Myths are supposed to call out to something ancient and vital in our hearts, after all.
allegro
This book is a classic, and is one of the best collections of Celtic myth on the market. Maybe _the_ best. Everyone who is a mythophile or a Celtophile should have a copy of this.
That said, it isn't perfect. Most of the flaws in it can be traced to the time in which it was written (1912). First, it stretches too far to compare everything to a Greek or Roman myth. To call the Dagda "Zeus" or Branwen "Aphrodite" is a little inaccurate, in my opinion, but I try to keep in mind the fact that he was presenting the Celtic myths to an audience obsessed with Greek myths. He even mentioned in his foreword that part of the reason for writing the book is because he was bored with poets' constant classical allusions, and wanted to give them a fresh well of legend on whicb to draw. So, in drawing parallels between Celtic and Greek myth, he was probably just trying to translate the Celtic myths into a format that his audience would understand.
The second, and more serious, gripe is Squire's anti-paganism. He buys into every rumor ever spread about Druidic human sacrifice. While at least one body has been found which was probably the victim of sacrifice, there is no evidence I've seen to indicate that the Celtic religion was the bloodbath it has sometimes been made out to be. Human sacrifice seems to have been present but very rare. Squire loves the Celts' stories, but tends to present the people themselves as bloodthirsty savages in dire need of Christianity to "civilize" them. Again, this may just be a product of Squire's times; he might have had to bash paganism just to get his book published in those days. Or the stories of widespread sacrifice may have been more commonly accepted as historical fact. I don't know. But if you can take his bias with a grain of salt, this is an excellent resource for anyone interested in Celtic myth.
Landaron
I wonder why it is that Dover insists on resurrecting these centenarian "classics" that reek from the profoundest nadirs of Victorian/Edwardian writing. The material, while bursting at the seams from its completeness and thoroughness of research, is presented in a most unappetizing manner. The author must circumlocute almost forever until he gets down to brass tacks, and--when he finally embarks on the meat of some myth or other--you have to read hard between the lines to torture the actual story line out of the narrative. There's got to be a better way to bone up on the rudiments of Celtic myth, and I think I've found it: "Druids, Gods and Heroes" by Anne Ross, likewise e-available at Amazon. You'd do well to avoid Squire and books of that ilk. Dover tries so very hard to deliver quality stuff, and they very often do, but Squire is *not* a shining example of their success in that direction.
Nikobar
CHARLES SQUIRES' CELTIC MYTH AND LEGEND reminds us of a classic truth: the more we think we're dfferent from each other, the more we are the same. The book also reminds us that certain things about human nature don't change. Using a mix of scholarly research and the retelling of ancient Celtic myths, SQUIRE examines how ancient Celtic gods and magical beings expanded, contraced, grew, disappeared, and reappeared in popular culture from the time people arrived in the British Isles and France to the present. He suggests that with each wave of immigrents, Celts, Vikings, Germans, Romans, Christians, new beliefs mingled with old. New gods replaced old, but ancient ideas lingered. Looking at story themes, plots, characters, and icons, Squire shows how these thoughts have come down to us today. I liked this book for that reason. When I finished reading it, I felt connected to ancient people. I also felt connected to modern people because the stories embodied in myth are universal. CELTIC MYTH AND LEGEND is also a book I can read on several levels. If I want to read some neat stories, I can pul it off the shelf. If I want a good of example of how scholars compare and contrast legends and draw conclusions about their origins, I can grab this volume. If I would like to simply be reminded of my humanity, I can thumb CHARLES SQUIRES' pages. My only complaint about CELTIC MYTH AND LEGEND is that SQUIRE'S language can get heavy. He often goes on for pages describing comparisons and characters in minute detail. This is not an easy read. Still, CELTIC MYTH AND LEGEND is a good reference book for the scholar, storyteller, or person who has more than idle curiosity about old tales.