Download Pendragon fb2

by Scott Lloyd,Steve Blake
Download Pendragon fb2
Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Author:
    Scott Lloyd,Steve Blake
  • ISBN:
    0712631216
  • ISBN13:
    978-0712631211
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Rider & Co (August 24, 2004)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1921 kb
  • ePUB format
    1842 kb
  • DJVU format
    1980 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    883
  • Formats:
    mbr lit azw mobi


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Steve Blake, Scott Lloyd.

They have painstakingly documented the evidence which leads them to the conclusion that Arthur was Welsh and lived, fought, and died in Wales. The evidence for this appears incontrovertible, even if the particular details are not necessarily as easily fleshed out.

Author: Steve Blake, Scott Lloyd ISBN 10: 0712631216. Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book. There will be no stains or markings on the book, the cover is clean and crisp, the book will look unread, the only marks there may be are slight bumping marks to the edges of the book where it may have been on a shelf previously. Pendragon by Steve Blake, Scott Lloyd (Hardback, 2002). Pre-owned: lowest price.

World of Books Australia was founded in 2005. Steve Blake, Scott Lloyd. Place of Publication. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard.

X, 310 pages, pages of plates : 24 cm. Using half-forgotten sources and clues hidden in the ancient Welsh landscape, historians Blake and Lloyd lead readers on an adventure every bit as exciting as the legend itself

X, 310 pages, pages of plates : 24 cm. Using half-forgotten sources and clues hidden in the ancient Welsh landscape, historians Blake and Lloyd lead readers on an adventure every bit as exciting as the legend itself. Arthur's family tree is traced, his warriors named, and his battlegrounds pinpointed. They reveal that Arthur was not the shining Christian knight of popular romance-not even a king at all-but a fearsome figure known simply as the Leader of Battles. Includes bibliographical references (pages 293-298) and index.

Book by Blake, Steve, Lloyd, Scott.

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In Pendragon, Steve Blake and Scott Lloyd explore the enigma of Arthur and reveal the kernel of truth that lies at. .InPendragon, authors Steve Blake and Scott Lloyd separate legend from fact and expose the enigma of Arthur.

In Pendragon, Steve Blake and Scott Lloyd explore the enigma of Arthur and reveal the kernel of truth that lies at the heart of the colorful legends about The Once. They differentiate the Arthur portrayed in popular literature and the romances of old from the warrior remembered in the early writings and traditions of his own people. Pendragonreveals that Arthur was not even a king and deciphers one of the greatest mysteries of all time: Where is Arthur buried?

Steve Blake & Scott Lloyd. This startling book reveals the kernel of truth at the heart of Arthurian legend

Steve Blake & Scott Lloyd. This startling book reveals the kernel of truth at the heart of Arthurian legend. Blake and Lloyd prove that Arthur was a real Dark Age warrior, with an extensive network of family, mistresses and foes, whom they name and locate, using geographical evidence and source material. They pinpoint the battlegrounds where he campaigned, explain who he fought against and why, and reveal the location of his burial place.

Book by Blake, Steve, Lloyd, Scott

Mejora
Pendragon is Blake and Lloyd's second book, and builds creditably on their first one, Keys to Avalon. They have painstakingly documented the evidence which leads them to the conclusion that Arthur was Welsh and lived, fought, and died in Wales. The evidence for this appears incontrovertible, even if the particular details are not necessarily as easily fleshed out. If nothing else, this is an incredibly important gift to Arthurian research, which hopefully will eventually supercede the always dubious, Arthurian claims of regions from Cornwall to Scotland.

As an anthropologist, I most appreciate their attention to the differences in language and culture which prompted later chroniclers and authors to shift Arthur from his original location to Great Britain as a whole.

Anyone looking for the 'real', historical Arthur will find him here.
Getaianne
This book is both interesting and in depth, answer many of the unknowns of the great King Arthur and his lifetime, the knights of the round table, and the greatest romances in the history of Britannia.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
This book, Pendragon: The Definitive Account of the Origins of Arthur ,
is an attempt to determine the truth about this famour king. It is an excellant text for those who are interested in this subject. My only reason for giving it four stars and not five, is that it is very tough reading. All of the name, places, etc, are Welsh making the text very hard to follow. But I really liked and enjoyed it.
Saberdragon
One of the best written historical references I have had the pleasure to read. Gives a historical document based evaluation of the Authurian theory.
Fiarynara
Pendragon: The Definitive Account of the Origins of Arthur does indeed come closest of all the Arthurian literature to identifying the real 6th century man. Mssrs. Blake and Lloyd do a great job of peeling away the later Medieval romanticist mythology to get at the northern Welsh warband leader as depicted in the original Welsh texts. Their examination of the geographic locations associated with Arthur and his compatriots is much more plausible an explanation than any other. Enlightening and again sound is their assertion that he fought most, or even all, of his battles against fellow Welsh Britons rather than Saxons (except possibly at Badon).

If there is one criticism it would be that the authors failed to follow their own evidence to what seems to me to be an obvious conclusion. They claim that Arthur was only a war leader and never a king but admit that Arthur is not a Welsh name. From their own information, it is possible that he started as a war leader under King Maelgwn of Gwynneth, where one of Arthur's hill fort 'courts' resides and where the early documents reveal to be his original homeland. Yet, he may have later become a king in his own right, the one they identify as Cuneglasus of the Bear's Stronghold. (Arthur comes from the Latin Artoris, which means The Bear.) He may well have been one of the adulterous underlings that Gildas criticized but also later one of the five kings who Gildas likewise lambasted. The second hill fort 'court' they identify lies within the small realm of that minor Welsh king. It is a real possibility that Arthur was Cuneglasus. As they point out, it was Gildas who attached animal names to the five kings he criticized, that one being the Bear. They also cite several early Welsh texts that call him a king or sovereign as well.

Their analysis of the origin of Pendragon, as part of that discussion, is ingenious.

All in all, for anyone who is interested in clearing away the Medieval Romance and finding out about the real Arthur, this is probably the most important tome to read. I heartily recommend it.
Global Progression
Pendragon is not just another book on King Arthur, it's a very cogently written discussion of the Welch documentation with a careful attention to the bearing of Welch geographic terminology of the time on identifying his purview.

While I find this type of puzzle intriguing, I'm not certain that the true aficionado of the Camelot tales will necessarily enjoy it. For the most part, the authors successfully debunk the romantic tales and set the person of Arthur in his proper milieu, the very scantily documented period after the departure of the Romans.

I agree with the authors that the individual who underlies the modern persona of Arthur was probably a real person, was actually not a king but a commander of a small militia employed by a Welch chief or war lord, and was involved in the nitty gritty details of surviving in a world left to fall apart when Rome pulled its forces back to Italy to defend it against invasion. I also agree with their point that the antagonists with whom Arthur fought a nd who ultimately killed him were other Welch warriors, not the Angles or the Saxons.

Like Blake and Lloyd, I tend to believe that the Britons were the early people of the island who were peripheralized by the Romans, individuals who chose not to participate in the Latinization of England but to continue their lives as they had been traditionally lived. The map the authors introduce on page 101 shows just how squashed up against the west coast of the island these people were. Furthermore, the early story of Boudicca and her daughters suggests that not everyone welcomed the influence of Roman culture on society. That there was still a vast divide is suggested by the fact that a large number of people left the island to return to defend Rome, telling the native inhabitants to defend themselves as best they could. Archeology in the relevant areas of England suggests that the region was virtually depopulated at the time. If the Angles and Saxons moved in at the behest of relatives already settled in England, it may well be that there were no other residents present to complain about it. Although confrontations between culturally distinct groups is always possible, I don't know that Arthur or his men would have been particularly concerned about any but their own immediate environs. There would simply not have been that level of national identity.

The authors point out that the territorial area over which Arthur was active is much over played in the romantic stories and that his actual venue was probably only a small area in Wales. This seems very likely. Part of the reason these areas were left to themselves by the Romans was because it was difficult to access it. Communications would have extended to nearby areas by land routes and somewhat more distant regions by sea and riverine routes, but extensive travel would have been difficult. The war lords would have been much more interested in protecting their immediate holdings from predation by neighboring rulers in a world where might made right, and it was with these individuals that most of the documents mentioning Arthur deal. In short, life in Arthur's court was probably difficult, unfair, violent and short.