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by Michael Parenti
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Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Author:
    Michael Parenti
  • ISBN:
    0312098413
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312098414
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    St Martins Pr; English Language edition (September 1, 1993)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1186 kb
  • ePUB format
    1514 kb
  • DJVU format
    1318 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    944
  • Formats:
    mobi doc lit lrf


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Arguing against the presumption that the . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Land of idols by Michael Parenti is about political mythology in America. Mythology pervades the political, social, cultural and ideological realm. All countries use mythology to inculcate ideology, nationalism, and identity. Parenti uses class analysis and unconventional theory to shed light on the subject as it pertains to the .

Prometheus Books published Parenti's 2010 book God and His Demons. Land of Idols: Political Mythology in America. St. Martin's Press, 1993.

Michael John Parenti (born 1933) is an American political scientist and cultural critic who writes on scholarly and popular subjects Contents. Prometheus Books published Parenti's 2010 book God and His Demons. Writing for the San Francisco Chronicle, Don Lattin said: "God and his Demons is a depressing, mean-spirited book.

In Land of Idols, Parenti examines the notion that American society has no dominant ideology. Arguing that this presumption is itself ideological, Parenti confronts the prevailing myths in American society that limit our perception of political reality and constrain progressive reform. Honest, insightful, and intelligent, Land Of Idols urges Americans to look beyond political mythology and work toward a truly democratic society. Some of the topics that Michael Parenti examines are: New Age beliefs that reduce social problems to matters of subjective personal experience.

Political Mythology In America. 0-31209-841-3 (cloth) 0-31209-497-3 (paper) St. No one challenges the political establishment with as much vigor and skill as Michael Parenti. In Land of Idols, Parenti examines the notion that American society has no dominant ideology. Published 1994 by St. Martin's Press in New York.

Home Parenti, Michael Land of Idols: Political Mythology in America. Cronus Books, LLC. is a Nevada based online reseller of New and Used Books. Published by St Martins Pr. Condition: Fine. Visit Seller's Storefront. Terms of Sale: We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the AbeBooks web sites.

Arguing against the presumption that the U.S. has no dominant ideology, the author confronts the myths in American society that limit the perception of political reality and constrain progressive reform

blac wolf
Land of idols by Michael Parenti is about political mythology in America. Mythology pervades the political, social, cultural and ideological realm. All countries use mythology to inculcate ideology, nationalism, and identity. Parenti uses class analysis and unconventional theory to shed light on the subject as it pertains to the U.S. The book provides a trenchant criticism of the institution of capitalism and the mythologies that sustain the social order that enshrouds it.

According to Parenti, “our political culture is riddled with mythologies that serve conservative class interests and keep us from fully pursuing out democratic interests.” The author informs us that “capitalism is not just an economic system, but an entire social and cultural order. Behind the state is a whole supporting network of doctrines, values, myths, and institutions that are not normally thought of as political.” But “culture does not operate in perfect harmony with the economic order.”

The “myth of pluralism or democratic pluralism is the belief that power in U.S. society is widely distributed. Policies are formulated through a multilateral interplay of interest groups. Conservatives denounce government meddling in our lives, yet direct the extension of state power in control of personal morals and political dissent. Myths and beliefs are mediated through a social structure, through socializing agents, parents, media, churches, schools, peers, and the state.”

This is an exceedingly well-researched and written book that stretches across many subject areas. The book unfolds many revealing lines that shed an iconoclastic view of these subjects. Here are a few telling lines taken from the book. “To say that we cannot legislate morality is to overlook the fact that the law does exactly that—albeit with imperfect effect. The law not only can legislate morality, it can encourage immorality—which is the other side of the same coin. While conservatives and many “moderates” argued that the federal government could not legislate morality in racial relations, the state governments in the South in fact were legislating immorality, enforcing racial segregation in housing, schools, transportation, and many other public and private facilities.”

This is an interesting and great read, but a little heavy on the academic side. Highly recommended for any reader wanting to step outside the conventional bubble of Fox News and conservative political punditry.
Gna
I loved this book as i have liked most michael Parenti books. He is a hero for poor people all over this country!
Nalmergas
In "Land of Idols: Political Mythology in America" Michael Parenti demolishes a number of more insidious and invidious tales of the state (see Tales of the State, Schramm and Neisser, 1997), tales that have been told from the ancients as they have sought to reserve power to themselves. Clearly, concisely, he shows how our contemporary lives are organized according to the whims of one slice of the population: the 2% who own 90% of the wealth, and exploit 98% of the people. Here's one common tale and its antidote: the economic pie will get bigger if only liberal government will get out of the way and let the free market do it's job. In fact, when the economic pie has grown larger, the bigger piece has always gone to the rich, leaving the working class with a smaller piece each time. A supplementary tale says that because they assume so much more risk than the working man does, capitalists deserve much bigger rewards. Tell that to an Enron employee, or someone who was downsized, who receive all the risks, none of the rewards, and don't have billions to fall back on.
He notes that any kind of Marxist perspective, even the use of the word "class" will not be tolerated in the media any longer. When Marxism is mentioned, it is excoriated as a failed system, and the notion of "class" is reviled along with this characterization. He points out that Marxist predictions have been more right than wrong, however. The creation of a worker's paradise through the withering away of the state never materialized, but his observations about business cycles and recessions were correct, as is his prediction of capital concentration, the growth of the proletariat and the increasing misery of the working class, the need for capital to chase around the world looking for new peoples and materials to exploit.
He suggests that the capitalists have made a monopoly culture in their own image through the funding of the arts, universities, the promulgation of legalistic views of the lifeworld, control of the media, medicine and healthcare. He destroys the "tales" that we have either pluralism or "democratic capitalism" as promoted by "free markets." He notes that rich live at such a remove in terms of social distance that they might as well be living on another planet and thus cannot hope to promote such ideals. And yet, the ruling class promulgates the tale that worthy members of the working class may some day attain this same lofty perch through hard work and pluck, when if fact there is very little movement between economic segments (or classes, as they used to be known before mainstream sociologists changed the terminology to make it more "neutral"). All proof to the contrary, this canard of the "rugged individualist" still enjoys the support of the media, and many Americans.
But is this a conspiracy? Here's a little known but appropriate quote from Abraham Lincoln (circa 1837) that speaks to this, as quoted by Parenti: "These capitalists generally act harmoniously, and in concert, to fleece the people..." For those who would point out that 20th century capitalism and early 19th century capitalism are incommensurable, he quotes a critical study of David Rockefeller's Trilateral Commission as a way of demonstrating how 20th century "conspiracies" work: "A conspiracy on the part of certain members of the international ruling class is not being suggested here, but rather that many of these people, who have a great deal of influence, are consciously making efforts to guide and control the direction of the world's political and socioeconomic system in their class interest." A de facto conspiracy, in other words.
Parenti sometimes goes a bit far in his acceptance of some conspiracy theories (multiple assassins of both Kennedy and Martin Luther King, the incompetent investigation of Malcolm X, for instance), but, given that it is the paranoid right who are historically much more likely to create and promulgate such theories -- liberal media, communists in the State Department, the hazards of fluoride, homosexual teachers perverting their students -- Parenti's occasional paranoia is relatively benign.
There was a political party in New York State in the early 1830s called the Anti-Masonry party, whose conspircist theories about the Freemasons served as the foundation for the Working Man's party, an anti-Albany Regency party which succeeded in driving Freemasons underground, and nearly out of existence. A similar anti-elitist party with a compelling conspiracy theory is what lefties need now!