Download The Rose Grower fb2

by Michelle De Kretser
Download The Rose Grower fb2
Literary
  • Author:
    Michelle De Kretser
  • ISBN:
    0091842042
  • ISBN13:
    978-0091842048
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage (2000)
  • Subcategory:
    Literary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1516 kb
  • ePUB format
    1420 kb
  • DJVU format
    1148 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    620
  • Formats:
    docx lit lrf doc


Writing with poignancy and mesmerizing detail, Michelle de Kretser has penned a haunting tale set against the madness of the French Revolution - a wistful. The Rose Grower has been added to your Cart.

Writing with poignancy and mesmerizing detail, Michelle de Kretser has penned a haunting tale set against the madness of the French Revolution - a wistful.

Michelle de Kretser was born in Sri Lanka and migrated to Australia with her family in 1972. The Hamilton Case won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for South-East Asia and the Pacific, the Encore Award and the Tasmania Pacific Prize for Australian and New Zealand fiction.

The Rose Grower book. Writing with poignancy and mesmerizing detail, Michelle de Kretser. Writing with poignancy and mesmerizing detail, Michelle de Kretser has penned a haunting tale set against the madness of the French Revolution - a wistful, elegantly rendered novel of unrequited love and personal triumph in a world gone tragically awry. The 1789 storming of the Bastille has brought France to the brink of revolution.

She is also the author or the novels The Rose Grower, The Hamilton Case, and The Lost Dog.

When Frances met Charlie at a party in Melbourne, Australia, he was married with a young son. Now that the couple has moved to subtropical Sydney, a lusher and more chaotic city, Frances has an unshakable sense that the world has tipped on its axis. She is also the author or the novels The Rose Grower, The Hamilton Case, and The Lost Dog.

I hope Michelle De Kretser is working on another because I'm already waiting in line. The Rose Grower is a historical novel that unfolds as languorously and luxuriously as the petals of any flower, revealing first one complexity, then another

I hope Michelle De Kretser is working on another because I'm already waiting in line. Sophie has stayed with me for days and days and I expect she's not going anywhere soon. The Rose Grower is a historical novel that unfolds as languorously and luxuriously as the petals of any flower, revealing first one complexity, then another. Although the story is interesting, it is De Kretser's lush and voluptuous prose that ultimately seduces us, opening our senses and pulling us into the world of the novel. The story beings on 14 July 1789, the day of the storming of the Bastille. com User, July 11, 2000.

by Michelle de Kretser. This book is like velvet; a rich and sensuous surface, concealing hidden and ultimately dangerous depths. The combination of politics and passion is irresistable. It's the first time I've ever felt sympathy with a French aristocrat during the revolution. Find similar books Profile. In French this rose is known as Cuisse d'nymphe emue.

About The Rose Grower.

The Rose Grower throws a subtle, slanting light on the underside of history, as a young woman and her family are caught up in the bloodthirsty years of the French Revolution. Her private passion is to create a repeat-flowering crimson rose, the first of its kind in Europe. But, as public events in Paris are duplicated in Gascony, her world turns upside down. An American balloonist falls out of the sky and into her life; while Joseph, a young working-class doctor, is also drawn into her orbit, and finds himself fatally torn between reason and desire, revolutionary zeal and unrequited love.

Michelle de Krester's gripping tale of love, roses and the French revolution is seductive, moving and beautifully written. The popularity of this book has made it a bestseller in Australia and the UK and the US.

Michelle De Kretser (author). The Rose Grower throws a subtle, slanting light on the underside of history, as a young woman and her family are caught up in the bloodthirsty years of the French Revolution. There is a great deal to enjoy in this book

In a remote province of southern France, a young woman nurtures an ambition to create a repeat-flowering crimson rose, the like of which has never been seen in Europe. Than an American balloonist falls out of the sky and into her life: and the local doctor who dreams of improving the world, is also drawn into her orbit. A love story begins to unfold against the sensuous green landscape of Gascony. But the year is 1789 and public events in Paris are closing in on the private world of the Saint-Pierre family. "The Rose Grower" throws a slanting light on the underside of history, where people find themselves torn between reason and desire, revolutionary zeal and unrequited passion. Seductive, moving and beautifully written, "The Rose Grower" is a gripping tale of love, roses and the French Revolution.

lucky kitten
You may not know this, as I haven’t blogged about the nonfiction books I’ve read about it here, but I’m fascinated by the French Revolution. Two of my favorite fictional portrayals of that event are Victor Hugo’s Quatrevingt-treize and Hilary Mantel’s A Place of Greater Safety. Now I can add Sri Lankan-Australian author Michelle de Kretser’s The Rose Grower to that list.

The Rose Grower takes place in a small town in Gascony, where a liberal aristocratic family, an American artist, and a doctor active in the revolution interact with unexpected consequences. It’s written in a beautiful omniscient, like both of the other novels I mentioned, though closer in tone to the intimacy and complicity of A Place of Greater Safety than to the grandeur of Quatrevingt-treize. It sometimes directly addresses the reader, saying of one character, “Think carefully before you dismiss him as wrong or foolish.” Which is a good bit of advice about the period generally.

My favorite parts of the book focused on the doctor, Joseph Morel, who is a deeply good person without being overly perfect, a difficult balancing act for the author (she doesn’t quite manage the same trick with his love interest and co-protagonist, Sophie). He’s snaps at people unfairly, gets lost in his own happiness to the point of losing track of others, and is easily manipulated by the offer of friendship. Nevertheless, he’s honorable and selfless. When, following a provincial equivalent of the September Massacres, he’s on the point of falling out with his fellow revolutionaries, who don’t seem terribly upset about the murders, they offer him a chance to improve the local hospital. “They knew better than to offer him the world,” as the narrator puts it, “So they offered him the chance to improve it.” Unfortunately, easily manipulated as he is, he doesn’t realize he’s been used until tragedy strikes.

Setting the story in a small provincial town rather than Paris allows for the worst aspects of the revolution to be the work of a single villain, a total sociopath whom no one sees for who he really is until it’s far too late. This would be totally implausible as an explanation of what went wrong generally, and the author does show a larger problem as the tribunal’s jurors condemn people for minor acts of dissent, but it works as a compelling and believable plot in the environment of a single town, and makes for a tense lead-up to the climax.

Kretser also has a realistic way of showing the hypocrisies of the time even in her sympathetic characters–the artist Stephen and his lover end up living on a plantation as slave-owners despite Stephen’s liberalism. This isn’t because they’re evil or uncaring people, but it’s a refusal to make the characters completely modern or even the best examples of their time. Joseph Morel by the end seems to have abandoned, for understandable reasons, the efforts at large-scale improvement of conditions that he undertook earlier. In his new town, the narrator notes from his point of view, “People starve here,” and it’s not clear what he’s doing about it beyond being a good doctor. Despite this, the characters are loveable.

I had a few bones to pick with minor historical details– the position of nuns during the revolution, the portrayal of women’s revolutionary societies, the description of why the Girondins fell–but the historical background is basically accurate despite relying on Simon Schama’s flawed Citizens (I should note that I never actually made it through Citizens, but a variety of sources lead me to believe that it is not exactly a great work of history).

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the period, or anyone just looking for a well-written, heartbreaking story.
Berkohi
I have one piece of advice to anyone considering reading this novel: Pray don't bother if you dislike lush, lyrical poetic prose. The reason being is that there's precious little else worth bothering about in the novel. Yes, it is set in southwest France during the years of the French Revolution, which one would think would add suspense and character development to the story. But, really, there is no story, and the characters have little or no depth to them.. The Revolutionary period is just a backdrop to what amounts to, for the most part, a literary still-life. I think this book is something like what Emily Dickinson would have produced had she tried to write a novel. On the one hand, this is a recommendation: Dickinson is one of the greatest, most nuanced poets ever to set pen to paper, but...well, try to imagine what a three hundred page novel by her might look like.

The passages that grip the poetically attuned reader as s/he embarks on the novel are stunning:

"The Pyrenees are invisible in this fine summer weather; and anyway, they lie over sixty miles to the south. Here, the landscape never loses sight of human proportions. Its contours are varied enough to prevent monotony, gentle enough to avoid grandeur. Its unassuming hilltops afford wide views. It is prodigal with light."

Really quite good, isn't it? And so it remains until about halfway through the book when one realises that one is never going to learn anything further about the characters' inner lives than one already knows. It's the familiar case a poetic novelist faces of trying to walk the tightrope between style and substance and, in this case, falling headlong into style.

One does, of course, learn a great deal concerning roses and their varieties and methods of cross-pollination and what not as practiced in late Eighteenth Century France. Also, there is a very undeveloped intellectual sub-theme concerning Rousseauism, but it never comes near being brought to fruition.

Still, Ms. De Kretser does hit the mark strikingly once in a while, and it's worth the reader's consideration to stop and pause over aperçus such as this one where she takes advantage of the reader's smug prejudice against the naïveté of Rousseau and his followers as she builds up a paragraph and then shoots the whole edifice down with the last sentence:

"Among the great redemptive ideas that had revolutionised his century was the belief that everyone had the right to happiness. People were essentially good, and everyone, not just a privileged minority, had the right to profit from life. Stephen believed these things certainly. Think carefully before you dismiss him as wrong or foolish."

Though the book doesn't really work as a novel, think carefully before you dismiss it altogether.
Auridora
In the ten years from 1789 to 1799 in the village of Montsignac in Southern France, love blooms among the tender petals of roses and the thorns of the French Revolution.

Jean-Baptiste raises his three daughters, Claire, Sophie, and Mathilde amid the isolation of the farming village while writing a treatise on the history of French food. There is a day of excitement when an American balloonist, Stephen Fletcher from Paris, falls from the sky into their fields, changing their lives and their world forever.

Claire, the eldest is married to a man in exile as a traitor and has his son. She loves the brash American but is morally tied to her husband, Hubert. Stephen loves Claire but knows he cannot have her and hopes that Hubert dies in the war. Sophie, the aspiring rose grower loves him too, but her love is unrequited. Joseph, the local doctor, loves Sophie but she barely notices him. Mathilde, the youngest, loves her dog, Brutus.

Joseph dislikes Stephen intensely. If he had to name a rose after him, it would be Bombast Recollected or Fragrant Fool. The arrogance of Stephen parallels the harshness of Joseph. To Sophie's father, neither is her ideal partner.

Love, jealousy, desire, and rejection are set among the disease and decay of the French Revolution. Malice, unpatriotism, counter-revolution and the spectacle of execution by guillotine are too strong for fragile love and roses.

Humorous, evocative and tragic, it is an intriguing and interesting novel.

Martina Nicolls, Author of "The Sudan Curse" and "Kashmir on a Knife-Edge"