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by Abraham Merritt
Download Seven Footprints To Satan fb2
Literary
  • Author:
    Abraham Merritt
  • ISBN:
    0860078124
  • ISBN13:
    978-0860078128
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Futura Publications; New Ed edition (1974)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1520 kb
  • ePUB format
    1282 kb
  • DJVU format
    1301 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    954
  • Formats:
    doc lrf rtf lit


Footprints" may have been a change in direction for A. Merritt, but it still makes for marvelous entertainment. 10 people found this helpful.

Footprints" may have been a change in direction for A.

Seven Footprints to Satan is a 1929 American film directed by Danish filmmaker Benjamin Christensen. It was first released as a silent film and later as a part-talkie. Jim and Eve, a young society couple, are kidnapped on the eve of Jim's departure for Africa and brought to a mansion that is home to a strange and glamorous Satanic cult

CHAPTER ONE. The clock was striking eight as I walked out of the doors of the Discoverers' Club and stood for a moment looking down lower Fifth Avenue.

CHAPTER ONE. As I paused, I felt with full force that uncomfortable sensation of being watched that had both puzzled and harassed me for the past two weeks. A curiously prickly, cold feeling somewhere deep under the skin on the side that the watchers are located; an odd sort of tingling pressure. It is a queer sort of a sensitivity that I have in common with most men who spend much of their lives in the jungle or desert

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Seven Footprints to Satan is a fantasy, horror novel by A. Merritt Abraham Grace Merritt was inducted in The Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 1999, its fourth class of two deceased and two living writers. Merritt. Originally published as a magazine serial in 1927 in Argosy Weekly and as a novel in 1928. Jim and Eve, a young society couple, are kidnapped on the eve of Jim's departure for Africa and brought to a mansion that is home to a strange and glamorous Satanic cult. Abraham Grace Merritt was inducted in The Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 1999, its fourth class of two deceased and two living writers. Язык: английский Категория: Фантастика и Фэнтези Переводчик: Издатель: Anncona Media AB Опубликовано: 2017-12-16 ISBN: 9789176052587.

Abraham Grace Merritt was born on January 20, 1884 in Beverly, New Jersey. He was originally steered towards a career in law but this later diverted to journalism. Seven Footprints To Satan - Abraham Merritt. Seven Footprints To Satan by Abraham Merritt. It was an industry where he would excel. Merritt was also an avid hobbyist and loved to make collections of his interests and, of course, also found time to write. Abraham Grace Merritt was born on January 20, 1884 in Beverly, New Jersey.

Title: Seven Footprints To Satan Author: Abraham Merritt A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBook eBook No. .

Title: Seven Footprints To Satan Author: Abraham Merritt A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBook eBook N. 0601971h. This eBook was produced by Richard Scott and updated by Roy Glashan.

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Download Abraham Merritt's SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. Download the SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN ebook free. The Face in the Abyss.


Malaris
To use an old-fashioned phrase about an old-fashioned book, this is a ripping yarn. Perhaps more to the point, it's been a hugely influential one -- even if that influence goes unrecognized and unacknowledged. There's been a whole raft of super-villains in film and in print since this novel appeared, but the Satan herein is the original. Although In some respects, he's an obvious heir of Sax Rohmer's Fu Manchu, the way he manipulates governments, stock markets, businesses and countless other legitimate organizations marked a new development in super-villains. Satan's omniscient and international aspect, combined with his secret base and its countless extraordinary features, has been resurrected in virtually every James Bond movie/novel. But many of the incidents in here have been appropriated by countless other subsequent novels and films. Take the episode where the hero, James Kirkham, has to steal a priceless necklace from a museum in order to demonstrate his fidelity to Satan. The clockwork precision of that burglary, including crucial misdirection, has influenced a hundred heist movies -- Ocean's Eleven being merely one of the most recent. The opening chapters where the hero, James Kirkham is drawn helplessly into Satan's lair, like a fly in a spider web, has similarly been borrowed from by numerous novels and films.
A reviewer elsewhere said this would make a great action film. It's already been done -- just under other guises. A real page-turner.
catterpillar
A. A. Merritt was a true master of fantasy pulp fiction. The worlds that he created were in a class of their own, detailed, extravagant, mesmerizing. While some of this may have been due to being paid "by the word", the results were gratifying to the reader.

This particular story is not a typical fantasy. Rather, it falls somewhat into the genre of Sherlock Holmes or Dr. Fu-Manchu. "Satan" is a criminal lord, dealing in vice and drugs. His followers are motivated by the chance to gain Satan's power through mounting a staircase leading to his throne. If they choose the correct seven steps, they win.

"Satan" is NOT Satan, but he IS a gloriously evil character and very hard to defeat. The story is told through the eyes of the good guy. Who wins? Read the story! If you like Holmes, you will like this!
Zieryn
This book was so much better than I expected people may be put off by the name of it but it was a great book
spark
Readers of Abraham Merritt's first four novels--"The Moon Pool," "The Metal Monster," "The Face in the Abyss" and "The Ship of Ishtar"--may feel a little surprised as they get into his fifth, "Seven Footprints to Satan." Whereas those earlier fantasy masterpieces featured exotic locales such as the Pacific islands, the Himalayas and Peru; extravagant purple prose, dense with hyperadjectival descriptions; and living light creatures, metallic sentient cubes, a lost semireptilian race and battling gods, "Footprints" takes place, for the most part, in good ol' New York City and its suburbs, and tells an almost realistic tale of kidnapping and crime in direct, almost blunt prose. Indeed, although "Footprints" first appeared in "Argosy" magazine in 1927, and in book form the following year, it almost reads as if it had come from the pages of one of the crime pulps, such as "Black Mask" or "Crack Detective Stories." In this fast-moving tale, we meet James Kirkham, an adventurer/explorer (and, with a name like that, future candidate for Star Fleet Academy!) who is kidnapped off the streets of downtown Manhattan by the minions of Satan, a crime lord/supervillain/evil genius. Kirkham is forced to play a game in Satan's lair, during which he is made to tread on seven glowing footprints, four of which are "fortunate" and three "unfortunate." Depending on the steps he lands on, he will either be killed, serve Satan for a year, be given a fantastic fortune, etc. I am not giving away too much by saying that Kirkham winds up a bond servant to Satan, and is compelled to commit various fantastic crimes while in his service. He is housed in Satan's mazelike chateau with dozens of others, and falls in love with a fellow prisoner, Eve. (I suppose having Kirkham's first name be "Adam" would have been forcing things a bit!)
Grotesque in appearance, vast of intellect, profound lover of beauty, and sadistic in the extreme, Satan makes for one terrific character. With his strain of Chinese background, he is reminiscent of Sax Rohmer's Fu Manchu, but also of the supervillains of Ian Fleming's James Bond novels. Indeed, for much of the novel, it is unclear whether Satan is or isn't the actual article; Old Scratch himself. The scenes in which he is present are quite riveting. Merritt keeps things barely on this side of reality; nothing that transpires in the book--the museum theft, the slaves kept in bondage by the mind-altering kehft drug, the worldwide criminal organization, the high-seas piracy--is beyond the realm of credibility. And, suiting style to story, Merritt, as I mentioned up top, writes in spare, wonderfully controlled, crime-pulp prose. Thus, we get a line such as "I shot from the floor, and ...drilled [him] through the head." The dropping of the aforementioned purple prose makes the book seem lean and streamlined; it really does move, and keeps the reader turning the pages. The finale of the book is thrilling in the extreme, and concludes most satisfactorily. I have read that "Footprints" was turned into a 1928 film starring Thelma Todd as Eve, but from the plot synopses on imdb.com, it would seem that this film is a very loose adaptation, at best. I'd love to see it one day, just for comparative purposes, but can't imagine it equalling the suspense and excitement of the book. "Footprints" may have been a change in direction for A. Merritt, but it still makes for marvelous entertainment.
Munimand
A. Merritt was one of the most popular writers in the fantasy field for many years. He had an unusual blend of elegance, poetry, awkwardness, romanticism and other patchquilt characteristics which, somehow magically, he pulled off. His pure fantasy novels, in the style of H. Riger Haggard, were a youthful fascination with me, a transportation to a never land that seemed at least possible if not hidden in the heart of a volcano somewhere. But 7FTS is altogether different. Though still somewhat stilted by a purple tint it is nonetheless a foreshadow or much more modern approach to suspense. I can seel Woolrich's work already determined. A plot involving white slavery, what seemed a tired artifice when I was a kid, but is already returning; drugs, Satanic overtones and a deadly stairway only equaled by the steps leading to Ming the Merciless, never to be scaled alive. It derives a lot of its horror from a truly surreal relationship between people ending up horribly and yet unable to stop doing what they are doing. A great read for the fantsy it is, part detective, part S&M (thought lightly), and partly the kind of writing where you assume the author saw it all at once and just hot handed his way through the manuscript in the kind of record time a fever dream might inspire.