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by Cynthia Ozick
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Literary
  • Author:
    Cynthia Ozick
  • ISBN:
    0525484019
  • ISBN13:
    978-0525484011
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Plume; 1st Edition edition (March 21, 1983)
  • Pages:
    270 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1725 kb
  • ePUB format
    1325 kb
  • DJVU format
    1518 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    596
  • Formats:
    mobi doc rtf lrf


Envy; or, Yiddish in America. The butterfly and the traffic light.

Envy; or, Yiddish in America. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The title story is about a bookseller whose books on mysticism are blamed for the suicide of a rabbi.

Sep 23, 2010 Greg rated it liked it. Shelves: fiction, short-stories, girls-girls-girls. But Cynthia Ozick is one of the greatest American writers of the last 50 years, and The Pagan Rabbi and Envy are possibly the greatest short fiction she's written (other contenders: "An Education" and the Puttermesser stories). The title story is about a bookseller whose books on mysticism are blamed for the suicide of a rabbi.

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support . Purchasing through our affiliates helps support JBC. Fiction. The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories.

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of Jewish literature. Ozick is a kind of narrative hypnotist. Her range is extraordinary; there is seemingly nothing she can’t do. Her stories contain passages of intense lyricism and brilliant, hilarious, uncontainable inventiveness. Discussion Questions. Jewish literature inspires, enriches, and educates the community.

These are stories that Ozick published in the late 1960's and 1971. There is no other story like "The Pagan Rabbi. It is both startling and poignant. And the characters are highly likable. Despite the early date of composition, one can clearly see her brilliance in her writing style. Her ability to string words together in a line, on a page, makes her one of the finest articulationists in business today. In particular, Ozick focuses on man's relationship to the spiritual world. And also, the manner in which these two worlds interact with each other. Often people seem to forget, that men and women who have a spiritual calling are also, just men and women.

The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories (1971) is the second book and first collection of stories published by American author Cynthia Ozick. The Pagan Rabbi" and "Envy; or, Yiddish in America", along with an interview with the author, were later collected as an audio book in 1989 read by Ron Rifkin and Mitchell Greenberg. Envy; or, Yiddish in America". The Butterfly and the Traffic Light".

and Other Stories (1971) is the second book and first collection of stories published by American author Cynthia Ozick

The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories (1971) is the second book and first collection of stories published by American author Cynthia Ozick. The Pagan Rabbi" and "Envy, or Yittish in America" along with an interview of the author were later collected as an audio book in 1989 read by Ron Rifkin and Mitchell Greenberg.

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The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories.

The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories.

Cynthia Ozick‘s first collection of stories, The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories, exemplifies her ability to. .

Cynthia Ozick‘s first collection of stories, The Pagan Rabbi and Other Stories, exemplifies her ability to articulate and explore juicy paradoxes in the fields of art and religion. For example, Ozick views fiction in its essence as contradicting Jewish tradition-because, of course, all art is a form of idolatry. But writing fiction is still her bread and butter.

Two stories deal with satanic manifestations: a rabbi is trapped by a naiad; an urbane lawyer is set upon by an.Miss Ozick writes with the cutcrystal precision of Singer and the scouring tragic-ironic strengths of Malamud - exceptional stories all.

Two stories deal with satanic manifestations: a rabbi is trapped by a naiad; an urbane lawyer is set upon by an enormous and fleshly sea nymph. In the most moving story, "The Doctor's Wife," a kind, passively dutiful bachelor of fifty, among a family of parasitical combatants, accepts the knowledge that "accommodation becomes permanence," too late for anything but a sere autumnal haze of gentle lies.

Ozick is a kind of narrative hypnotist. Her range is extraordinary; there is seemingly nothing she can't do. Her stories contain passages of intense lyricism and brilliant, hilarious, uncontainable inventiveness.

Runemane
These are stories that Ozick published in the late 1960's and 1971. Despite the early date of composition, one can clearly see her brilliance in her writing style. Her ability to string words together in a line, on a page, makes her one of the finest articulationists in business today.

In particular, Ozick focuses on man's relationship to the spiritual world. And also, the manner in which these two worlds interact with each other. Often people seem to forget, that men and women who have a spiritual calling are also, just men and women. In addition it is sometimes forgotten; that regular men and women, sometimes may be very spiritual.

But that too is a subject for Ozick in her book, the difference between men and women, or in particular, the manner in which the world reacts to them. She examines this in interesting detail in her story "Virility." And within her story "The Doctor's Wife" she reveals a perfectly exquisite line "... that the worthlessness of everything was just what gave everything its worth" creates a unique perspective for the reader. It is interesting to consider life as being worthless, particularly in an existential manner, but can one also see, this very existential worthlessness truly imparts worth, not only denigrates that which seems to have none.

As always, the brilliance of Ozick's compositional ability cannot be ignored. This book is recommended for all who find beauty in the written word, when portrayed with such elegance.
Jorius
This collection of short stories is written by one of my favorite authors, Cythia Ozick. Her book, The Shawl, is a brilliant and beautiful novella. These short stories do not disappoint. Like her other works, many have deal with philosophy and Jewish theology. They are more than just stories. They provide food for thought - - they are all works that will stay with the reader long after they are read. Some of my favorites from this collection are:

--The Pagan Rabbi
--Envy
--Yiddish in America
--The Suitcase

Anyone who likes to read literature of substance and enjoys short stories will appreciate this collection.
Manona
Not her best, for sure. I read some of the stories, but some just rambled on and on. Try her other fiction first.
ℓo√ﻉ
There is no other story like "The Pagan Rabbi." It is both startling and poignant. And the characters are highly likable.
Invissibale
Used book (not Amazon) - appearance as advertized. Unfortunately, it has a moldy oder. Will probably NOT buy another used book for fear of the same problem.
GawelleN
Totally not a fan of her writing style. It's like Ozick tries to find every writing rule and break it just for the sake of breaking it, trying to somehow be "revolutionary," or "abstract." She rambles on and on, has no plot, no character ark, uses big words every other five seconds, leeches for empathy from the readers, tries to force her ideals on you, and to put it quite simply her writing is boring. Her characters have no voice, nor are they three-dimensional. A lot of people will say she's great, but I really don't think we should say that just because she's Jewish, and she's old. Critique her writing! Be honest! She's a bad writer. I read to be delighted, enlightened, and enthralled. I don't read to feel like I'm being indoctrinated. If her work was published now only a few would buy it. There's different strokes for different folks, but Ozick is not for me. She's an intellectual, but definitely not a writer.
Vichredag
From the first and second piece in this collection, the reader thinks that Ozick is a more Americanized version of Isaac Singer. But there are surprising twists along the way. The Pagan Rabbi is about a rabbi who finds the divine (and destruction) in the worship of Nature. Envy; or Yiddish in America, is a fine elegy of a language and the perils of translation. The Suitcase, a story of an émigré painter. The Dock Witch, a modern tale of a witch who sucks the vital essence of her men. The Doctor's Wife, a curious story of a man broken by remorse and fantasy. The Butterfly and the Traffic Light, a very short allegory of transformation and its dangers. And Virility, a tale of a set during and just after the First World War, but told through the lens of a one-hundred year old narrator who lives in a utopian future. Taken individually, the stories are not unique or surprising. Ozick's endings are conventional and fail to do justice to the strength behind. But the unconventional coupling of these stories when strung together make for excellent reading. Here the collection is stronger than its building blocks.
Demonstrating once more that Cynthia Ozick has an astonishing ability to capture accurately the secret desires, fears, and milieu of her characters. By turns funny, tragic, and corrosive. Worth buying for the story (or essay?) "Envy; or Yiddish in America" alone. You'll never think about Isaac Bashevis Singer the same way again.