Download Kafka on the Shore fb2

by Oliver Le Sueur,Sean Barrett,Haruki Murakami
Download Kafka on the Shore fb2
Literary
  • Author:
    Oliver Le Sueur,Sean Barrett,Haruki Murakami
  • ISBN:
    9626344059
  • ISBN13:
    978-9626344057
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Naxos Audiobooks; Unabridged edition (May 1, 2006)
  • Subcategory:
    Literary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1289 kb
  • ePUB format
    1961 kb
  • DJVU format
    1530 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    716
  • Formats:
    docx rtf lrf doc


Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur recount the odysseys of Nakata, an old man who was left simpleminded (but able . Giving a quick plot synopsis is not exactly an easy thing to do for Kafka on the Shore, or any Murakami book

Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur recount the odysseys of Nakata, an old man who was left simpleminded (but able to speak with cats) by a mysterious WWII event, and Kafka Tamura, a stoic, self-disciplined 15-year-old who runs away from home to escape an Oedipal prophecy. Barrett and Le Sueur turn in superb performances. Giving a quick plot synopsis is not exactly an easy thing to do for Kafka on the Shore, or any Murakami book. Let’s just say that Kafka on the Shore has many of the Murakami staples: lost cats, cats talking, eccentric types, alternating storylines, slacker types, American pop culture, music, wandering, and ventures into different realms.

Translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel. This Is a Borzoi Book Published by Alfred A. Knopf. Murakami, Haruki, (Umibe no Kafuka. Kafka on the shore, Haruki Murakami. All rights reserved under International and Pan-American. translated by Philip Gabriel.

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Home Haruki Murakami Kafka on the Shore. The painting of the shore?" Miss Saeki nods. Yes, Kafka on the Shore. I want you to take it. Where, I don't care. Kafka on the shore, . 0.

The official US site of Haruki Murakami. Along the way Kafka on the Shore investigates and sometimes challenges our conceptions of time, fate, chance, love, and the very nature of human reality. Enter Murakami’s world to explore the books, read interviews, discover music, browse image galleries, and much more. The novel offers up a rich array of extraordinary characters and outrageous happenings: fish falling from the sky, conversations between man and cat, a supernatural Colonel Sanders’s ghostly but deeply sensual lovers, a philosophical prostitute, World War II soldiers untouched by time, and much else both strange and wonderful.

Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur recount the odysseys of Nakata, an old man who was left simpleminded (but able to speak with cats) by a mysterious WWII event, and Kafka .

Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur recount the odysseys of Nakata, an old man who was left simpleminded (but able to speak with cats) by a mysterious WWII event, and Kafka Tamura, a stoic, self-disciplined 15-year-old who runs away from home to escape an Oedipal prophecy. Their rich characterizations keep this blend of the real and surreal totally engrossing.

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By Haruki Murakami Read by Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur. Discover Book Picks from the CEO of Penguin Random House US. Category: Literary Fiction Contemporary Fantasy.

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"Kafka on the Shore" is the latest novel by Japan's leading literary novelist, who developed a world-wide cult reputation with "Norwegian Wood". In "Kafka on the Shore", Murakami continues with his remarkable combination of profound insight into humankind, with a totally credible touch of the fantastical - a unique tour de force. The teenager Kafka Tamura goes on the run, and holes up in a strange library in a small country town. Concurrently, Nakata, a finder of lost cats, goes on a puzzling odyssey across Japan. Only gradually do we find how these stories interweave. An engaging but moving novel.

Jarortr
Have you ever experienced one of those realistic dreams that take place in the time and space between sleep and waking up? Anything is possible that realm. And no matter how outrageous it might seem later, at the time everything feels more vivid and more real than your waking world? For that moment in time, and despite all appearances to the contrary, your ability to discern connections runs free of logical restraints.

Kafka on the Shore reads like one of those dreams. It's something apart from your daily world. You think it's spilling over into your waking memories, but if you take a closer look, you recognize how it's always been a part of you and always will be.

And just like one of those dreams - one so fabulous, so fantastic, and so utterly involving - you don't want it to end.

What makes it so? The poetry of Mr Murakami's metaphors strike deep. His characters are well drawn, each one unique in their uniqueness. They're not transparent and definitely not predictable. To say what or who they are would not do them justice and would sell your experience short. However, when it's all said and done, and if you open yourself up to the self understanding, it's not difficult to see that each one is a part of you.

And the story itself? Well, like Nakata or Hoshino, you must be patient to see where events take you. Just when you think you have it figured out, Mr Murakami adds another twist to the plot or to the metaphor in play all the way up to a very perfect ending. And you still don't want the dream to end even though the alarm clock of the last word on the last page is ringing out, telling you the dream is over and it's time to put the book down.
Hellstaff
SPOILER FREE:
A few chapters in, I had no idea what was going on or why I was reading this. I finished it last night and couldn't believe no one told me about this sooner. Sure, it's strange and taboo, but it is certainly a good read. I think this would have been better to read when I was a bit younger (perhaps 15?), but it still resonates with you later in life.

This might be a prime book to read with a group, as there is a lot left to the reader to fill in. There are elements of magical realism, mixed with a vague afterlife, all within a backdrop of mundane realism. It's sad, thoughtful, funny, and all over a good read. worth it.
Vetalol
Giving a quick plot synopsis is not exactly an easy thing to do for Kafka on the Shore, or any Murakami book. Let’s just say that Kafka on the Shore has many of the Murakami staples: lost cats, cats talking, eccentric types, alternating storylines, slacker types, American pop culture, music, wandering, and ventures into different realms. Kafka on the Shore follows two storylines: one a teenager named Kafka who has decided to run away from home, the other an odd, elderly simpleton named Nakata who experienced a strange incident as a child which left him with odd powers. As we progress further into the plot, Kafka and Nakata stories begin to coincide with one another. Both of these plotlines have the theme of the journey or wandering towards an unseen destination, the destination being both physical and metaphorical. I think this journey from both characters represents a part of finding oneself, coming to terms with one’s identity. This comment is probably a gross oversimplification, though, because there is a deeper transformation going on as well. Along the way, there a bevy of interesting characters: Miss Saeki, a mysterious woman who works in a private library; Oshima, her assistant who often spouts philosophical wisdom; Hoshino, truck driver and slacker type, Colonel Sanders, a “concept.”

The basis for the book’s title is the name of a song, “Kafka on the Shore” that Miss Saeki wrote when she was young and in love. Kafka reads through the lyrics and becomes enamored with the tune. The song’s lyrics mentions “little fish” raining from the sky and a girl’s “search for the entrance stone”, both which are part of this novel. In fact, the song is sort of an allegory for much of the novel’s premise.

I think my favorite quote that comes from this book is when Miss Saeki is speaking with the young protagonist Kafka on a book she wrote about lightening: “The book didn't come to any conclusion, and nobody wants to read a book that doesn't have one. For me, though, having no conclusion seemed perfectly fine.”

I thought this a fitting quote in some ways, as it seems to illustrate and depict not only “the quest” in Kafka on the Shore, but the entire Murakami reading experience. This is my third read from Murakami (I read Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World and The Wind Up Bird Chronicle within the last year) , and what I’ve come to realize is that there are no easy answers or solutions in his works. There are few very definites; rather, metaphors come to be the basis for the plot. Emotion often is the central piece in directing a character towards a path. The search is always ongoing. Part of the journey of Kafka on the Shore is putting your own conclusions together. And this is what I love about Murakami’s books. He can take the trivial of life and combine it with the illogical, imaginative and symbolic and somehow make it all work. There is a poetic brilliance about the journey, one that takes us to two converging storylines to a new place and destination.

Perhaps Oshima, speaking philosophy to Kafka about tragedies, says it best when he quotes “Man doesn’t choose Fate. Fate chooses man.” This is indicative of Kafka on the Shore’s direction.
Very Old Chap
This novel was recommended to me twice in one week by different people. So naturally I bought a copy and gave it a read.

I just finished it and let me say, I love it. To be honest I cant pinpoint exactly what makes this book so extraordinary. It may be the fact that there are twists and turns you don't see coming. It may be the random scenes that occur that make no sense but someone work with the story. It may be that although there are two completely separate story lines, they somehow blend together so well. To be honest, it was probably all of that and some more. If you were to ask me the moral of the story or what the story was about, I don't think I would be able to tell you. But one thing I know for sure is that this is a book everyone should read. It is exciting, unlike any other books I read, and draws you in. You make connections to the story, and the characters are way ahead of the times. All and all, it is worth the read.