Download The Gilded Age fb2

by Mark Twain
Download The Gilded Age fb2
Literary
  • Author:
    Mark Twain
  • ISBN:
    1144345359
  • ISBN13:
    978-1144345356
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Nabu Press (February 12, 2010)
  • Pages:
    626 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1739 kb
  • ePUB format
    1473 kb
  • DJVU format
    1949 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    175
  • Formats:
    rtf mobi txt doc


The gilded age. A Tale of Today. by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

The gilded age. by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner. This book was not written for private circulation among friends; it was not written to cheer and instruct a diseased relative of the author's; it was not thrown off during intervals of wearing labor to amuse an idle hour. It was not written for any of these reasons, and therefore it is submitted without the usual apologies.

The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today is a novel by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner first published in 1873. It satirizes greed and political corruption in post-Civil War America. Twain and Warner originally had planned to issue the novel with illustrations by Thomas Nast.

In this book Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner heap scathing criticism on the US congress, the justice system . A very barbed satire indeed. Mark Twain's observations of The Gilded Age remain spot on today. I am off to crawl under my bed and wait for the Great Apocalypse.

In this book Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner heap scathing criticism on the US congress, the justice system, the press and society in general.

The Gilded Age: A Tale of To-Day is far from the greatest novel about Washington ever written. It fails to reach the genre standard set, say, by Gore Vidal in Washington, . That said, The Gilded Age is a fascinating and rewarding read: fascinating especially to lovers of its famous co-author. This dress rehearsal of Mark Twain’s great fictional career is reason enough to recommend The Gilded Age. As a bonus, the novel rewards anyone curious to discover how backroom deals, sexual intrigue, and high-powered deception differed between the Washington of 130 years ago and the Washington of today. Quick hint: not much.

The Gilded Age (1873), a collaboration with Hartford neighbor Charles Dudley Warner, sends up an age when vast fortunes piled up amid thriving corruption and a city Twain knew well, Washington, . full of would-be power brokers and humbug. Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand," Mark Twain once wrote. In this sixth volume in The Library of America's authoritative collection of his writings-the final volume of his fiction-America's greatest humorist emerges in a surprising range of roles: as the savvy satirist of The Gilded Age, the brilliant plotter of its inventive sequel, The American Claimant, and, in two Tom Sawyer novels, as the acknowledged master revisiting his.

The phrase Gilded Age was coined by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley in a book they jointly wrote, The Gilded Age . Mark Twain started writing books when he was 37 years of age starting with Gilded Age. The year of 1872.

The phrase Gilded Age was coined by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley in a book they jointly wrote, The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, which was released in 1873. What year did Mark Twain start writing books? Mark Twain started writing books when he was 37 years of age starting with Gilded Age.

The Gilded Age" was my first Kindle book. I read it along with a history of the Progressive Movement, which was enjoyable and useful for placing myself in late 19th-century America

The Gilded Age" was my first Kindle book. I read it along with a history of the Progressive Movement, which was enjoyable and useful for placing myself in late 19th-century America. Twain created a satirical tragedy that masterfully encapsulates the excess of the Gilded Age, and the distractions that drove our entire society into a ditch. It's brilliance is manifested by its relevance to our world today, almost 140 years after its publication. The story describes a fundamental aspect of human nature that we all need to examine more closely.

The term gilded age, commonly given to the era, comes from the title of this book. Twain and Warner got the name from Shakespeare's King John (1595): "To gild refined gold, to paint the lil. s wasteful and ridiculous excess

The term gilded age, commonly given to the era, comes from the title of this book. s wasteful and ridiculous excess. Act IV, scene 2) Gilding gold, which would be to put gold on top of gold, is excessive and wasteful, characteristics of the age Twain and Warner wrote about in their novel

The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today was a famous satirical novel by Mark Twain set in the late 1800s, and the term Gilded Age soon came to define the tumultuous years between the Civil War and the turn of the twentieth century

The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today was a famous satirical novel by Mark Twain set in the late 1800s, and the term Gilded Age soon came to define the tumultuous years between the Civil War and the turn of the twentieth century. During this era, America became more prosperous and saw unprecedented growth in industry and technology.

Gilded Age - Der herrschaftliche Sommersitz The Breakers in Newport (Rhode Island) entstand während des Gilded Age Gilded Age (dt.

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Anarawield
Although not among Mark Twain's funniest, the book does provide insight into how many infrastructure projects were financed in the post Civil War era of political corruption. Sadly, in the process, the story enhances the still popular misconception that many of the reconstruction initiatives aimed at uplifting the freedmen were also corruption riddled, and, thereby, provides some insight to why the reconstruction largely failed.
Funny duck
This novel is an interesting read to the 21st-century reader in part because of the demonstration of the burgeoning talent of its famous co-author (Twain) and in part because one can compare its story to modern society and government. The Victorian melodramatic aspects of the book are less interesting, and the family saga aspect of the novel needs work (some characters get lost for a dozen chapters or so and then turn up in Australia, for no apparent reason). Twain's writing for the satirical portions is excellent and worth reading.

All in all, then, a decent read, even though part of the novel has not stood the test of time. For someone who is interested in Twain or political novels, I would give it 4 stars.

However, I have to say that I found the Kindle version of the book to be inadequate. (YES, I am talking about the Modern Library edition and not some scanned edition.) The book is full of chapter epigrams (over 63 of them) and footnotes, almost all of which are not "clickable." In a properly produced book, you can get to a footnote by moving the cursor to it and clicking on it. You are then brought to that note, and after reading it, you hit "back" to return to the text. This is convenient and about the only acceptable way to read notes in an e-book. (I guess they could be presented at the bottom of the page, though that would probably create difficult formatting problems.)

The Modern Library chose not to do that for its own notes and for the epigrams in many obscure languages. Instead, to read a footnote, you had to go through the following simple steps (which I am not making up):
1. Hit "Menu"
2. Select "Go to..."
3. Select "Table of Contents" [Notes is not an option.]
4. Page ahead three times until you get to the page when Notes are listed on the Table of Contents.
5. Move the cursor down to "Notes"; Click
6. Now page forward through the notes until you find the footnote you are looking for. If it is a later chapter, this could be 5 or 10 pages.
7. When done reading, hit "Back" twice to return to the text.

Child's play, eh? You do this *every time you want to read a footnote*! Only the authors' very few original footnotes were directy clickable. The many more editor's footnotes required the above procedure. Alternatively, you could memorize the book location where the notes were, and directly type that in at step 3 above, although that doesn't save as many keystrokes as you would think, because numbers are typed in via an awkward menu, rather than directly.

The text of the book tells us that the epigrams are translated on page 475. However, the page numbers in the Kindle edition only go up to page 269 according to the Go to... menu. So much for reading the epigrams! I read all them after finishing the novel, since trying to find them in each of the 63 chapters would have been impossible. Well, it would have been possible if the editors had simply put the translations in the text or made the epigrams clickable to their translations. However, that would have required a little programming work.

Oh, I'm not bitter! However, my rating of the production of this e-book is only 2 stars, so my overall rating (novel itself plus Modern Library's production) is 3 stars. If you're the kind of person who doesn't care about footnotes, then you can probably enjoy this publication much more than I did. Or, now that you know of this problem, you can just forget the footnotes and read through without letting them annoy you.

Modern Library is an excellent publisher of printed books, but they need to understand that getting us to spend money for an e-book may require thoughtfulness and programming on their part. If they don't put in this work, you might as well just download a free scanned version.
WOGY
I keep relishing this sentence after reading this novel by Mark Twain and Charles Warner: "It is worth noting that the only land which turns out to have tangible value is that for which its owner has literally and physically struggled; land that is exploited in the expectation of quick fortunes remains a lure and a snare." This statement sums up how I feel about my own self-created career. The subtitle of this novel, "A Tale of Today" applies to 1873 (when the book was published) as much as it does today. We desire quick, rich results when, time and again, we realize that we get what we work for with diligence, determination and devotion.
doesnt Do You
I chose this book to use for two bookclub meetings, one for the American gilded age and the other for the study of Mark Twain. It's perfect for both. Although it's not the best book written by Twain it is his first full length book and very interesting from that prospective as well. I'll also add that it's not an easy book to read due to the style and language.

What is interesting is the story which with some alterations could be written today. The story line explores the dreaming and scheaming of those who want to get rich quick, politicans who are less than honest and those too lazy to work or to have a desire for improvement. It could describe people and situations that we've all encountered (perhaps we can even find ourselves).

I'd recommend this book to those who are interested in the age following the American Civil War.
Gom
"The Gilded Age" was my first Kindle book. I read it along with a history of the Progressive Movement, which was enjoyable and useful for placing myself in late 19th-century America. Twain created a satirical tragedy that masterfully encapsulates the excess of the Gilded Age, and the distractions that drove our entire society into a ditch. It's brilliance is manifested by its relevance to our world today, almost 140 years after its publication. The story describes a fundamental aspect of human nature that we all need to examine more closely.

Mark Twain is such an American treasure; I wish he had a contemporary counterpart.
Hap
I just received this book yesterday, so I haven't read more than a few pages yet. It has the same deficiency as a couple of other books I have purchased on Amazon recently. The text of the original book is present, but nothing else. It is very cheaply printed. There are obvious mistakes that should have been caught by an editor. There are no page numbers and no page separations. When a new chapter begins, it just starts in the middle of a page as if it were just a new paragraph.

I don't fault the "publisher" for putting this book out, since this may be the only way to get a new copy of an out of print book. But I think Amazon should make it clear to buyers what they are getting. There should be a way to classify this type of book, and give details about things like font size and readability..
Whitestone
Twain paints a vivid picture that remains true today. The major difference is that Congress is corrupt in a different way, and less able to accomplish anything.
Smells wonderful before use, but stinks after. Color was instant and looks natural! But be careful with white clothes it will stain them. This would be a good event tanner.