Download Or So It Seems fb2

by Paul Steven Stone
Download Or So It Seems fb2
Humor & Satire
  • Author:
    Paul Steven Stone
  • ISBN:
    1438207697
  • ISBN13:
    978-1438207698
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 26, 2008)
  • Pages:
    434 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humor & Satire
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1538 kb
  • ePUB format
    1917 kb
  • DJVU format
    1538 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    359
  • Formats:
    lit rtf doc mbr


Or So It Seems - or perhaps, So It Would Seem - is both a complex and lighthearted, weird and charming, descriptive and vague story of life lessons learned. Paul Steven Stone, your Mom should listen to you from now on! It IS a book we want to read.

Or So It Seems - or perhaps, So It Would Seem - is both a complex and lighthearted, weird and charming, descriptive and vague story of life lessons learned. Although a little wordy and repetitive at times, the message is still significant: Life is hard, living it harder, but resources and help abounds IF we are paying attention.

Or So It Seems - Paul Steven Stone. The idea of resting in consciousness at this singular moment-of trying to Drink My RC Cola-seems as ludicrous to me as trying to read a book while traveling down a landslide

Or So It Seems - Paul Steven Stone. The idea of resting in consciousness at this singular moment-of trying to Drink My RC Cola-seems as ludicrous to me as trying to read a book while traveling down a landslide. But what was I talking abou. Oh yes, the purpose of life.

As a former member of The Seekers For Truth, a cult-like scho Part odyssey, part oddball adventure, Or So It Seems offers a breathtaking but comical look at one man’s spiritual journey.

Or So It Seems offers a breathtaking but humorous look at one man’s spiritual journey

Stone’s TV commercials for . Mason appear in every Red Sox, Yankees, Nationals and Phillies baseball game. Or So It Seems offers a breathtaking but humorous look at one man’s spiritual journey. In Paul Peterson we are given a comically tragic hero beset by divorce, single parenthood, and the difficulties of living a simple life in a complex universe.

Or So It Seems is an album by Graham Lewis, Bruce Gilbert and Daniel Miller under the pseudonym Duet Emmo (an anagram of Dome and Mute), released in 1983 by Mute Records. The title track was also released as a 12" single.

Books related to Or So It Seems.

As a former member of The Seekers For Truth, a cult-like school of self development, Peterson holds a mystical view of the universe through which he examines the chain of events that have brought him to this absurdly humorous personal crisis,. he seemingly random series of events that are strung together on Karmic thread like Japanese lanterns. Books related to Or So It Seems. A Heartbreaking Work Of Staggering Genius.

Or So It Seems : Being Mr. Peterson's First-Ever Do-It-Yourself Workshop. by Paul Steven Stone. As a former member of The Seekers For Truth, a school of self development, Peterson holds a mystical view of the universe through which he examines the chain of events that have brought him to this absurdly humorous personal crisis.

is a story I wrote years ago, and published in my book "How To Train A Rock"

For more info, see: PaulStevenStone. info or HowToTrainARock. About Me. Or So It Seems. Pretty White Gloves" is a story I wrote years ago, and published in my book "How To Train A Rock". Developed in joint participation with the Paul Steven Stone Career Institute, under the watchful eye of political appointees and the usual party hacks, our new GOP Global Warming Career Center just might be the fresh start you, and the rest of the country, has been waiting for.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Paul Steven Stone books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

As we meet Paul Peterson he is being dragged reluctantly toward an oversized couch by a wine-emboldened, faded beauty named Allison Pratt. As a former member of The Seekers For Truth, a school of self development, Peterson holds a mystical view of the universe through which he examines the chain of events that have brought him to this absurdly humorous personal crisis. The novel follows Peterson's Do-It-Yourself Workshop, a supernatural, self-examination that takes him back and forth in time. Along the way, he is joined by a Hindu Holy Man known as The Bapucharya. Greatly amused by Peterson's life challenges, the irrepressible Bapucharya plays both Greek Chorus and Sancho Panza to Mr. Peterson's comically tragic hero. It is Peterson's search for answers to the mysteries of his life that this fantastic tale speeds us through, with a conclusion as startling as it is supremely fitting. You have never before read a novel like this!

Zahisan
Or So It Seems is quite an achievement, because it delineates an entire spiritual/philosophical system via a novel--and makes it interesting! And it's such a good system, too, humor or no humor. I'm guessing that the author's message is essentially serious, but conveyed in an often humorous way to make it more engaging. I'm sure he had sources for it, but he made it his own with the clever use of names for the concepts--BPU and so on--and the way he ties it all together.

And it certainly is engaging--and entertaining. It's very hard not to like the protagonist, who embodies the struggle we all have to make sense of what goes on in our life. And Bapucharya (spelling?--I don't have the book next to me) is one of the most delightful characters I've ever encountered. I'm not sure where the author learned all the wisdom Bapucharya conveys--and with such humor--but it's good stuff! It reinforced many things that I already believe, and would, I'm sure, be highly enlightening to someone never introduced to such concepts. So, it's a real gift to the world.

As a former book editor, I'd be less than honest if I didn't also say that I think the book could have been shorter. The protagonist sometimes goes on a bit too much about those spiritual concepts and sometimes examines his own feelings and actions in almost Proustian detail. Also, some of the concepts are re-explained too many times--though it may have seemed that way to me because many of the concepts were more or less familiar; it might be necessary as a pedagogical device for people without such a spiritual orientation.

That said, the novel is an amazing accomplishment, and I find myself this morning thinking back to many of the situations and ideas the author describes--which, for me, is the true test of whether a piece of writing is effective. If a work resonates in the mind and heart, it clearly conveyed something of value and depth. And I don't find that that happens very often for me with contemporary fiction.
Roram
OR SO IT SEEMS by PAUL STEVEN STONE

-- reviewed by Manson Solomon

If the title of Paul Steven Stone's novel doesn't tell us that we are about to enter a world in which we are not quite sure what is real, the blind elephant tapping his way across the cover confirms it: something different is about to happen in these pages. The old Hindu legend of the blind men each feeling a different part of the elephant and coming to different conclusions as to what they are confronting is well known, but when it is the elephant itself which is portrayed as blind and groping its way through the world, what's up with that?

Stone's view of the world as it might appear through the eyes of a blind elephant will not surprise those already familiar with his wry sense of humor portrayed in his collection of pieces assembled in How to Train A Rock. Serious stuff masquerading as burlesque, Mark Twain meets Philip Roth meets Saul Bellow meets Paul Steven Stone. The hilarity begins very early on with the protagonist being dragged towards a ratty couch by his determined would-be seducer, who, we later discover, turns out to be his nine-year old son's schoolteacher. Whom he discovered at a bizarre singles dance which he finds himself attending after his disorienting divorce. And then there is the hilarious encounter with the gold-digging single mother whom he picks up at the scouts' pinewood derby -- where his creative effort to fashion a car from a wooden block - painted pink! -- results in embarrassment for him and his son. Yes, it's funny, but it's also serious, since behind the humor the protagonist's escapades constitute an existential exploration, a quest to find solid reality - what is -- behind the illusion of appearances -- what seems -- and to restore dignity to his life after a debilitating divorce.

Sound like Bellow's Moses Herzog with a sense of humor, Roth's Alexander Portnoy without the hysteria? Well, perhaps so, since where Bellow tried to restore his hero's emotional equilibrium via intellectual scribblings, and Roth paraded his overwrought Freudian ejaculations for help, Stone gives us an ongoing dialog conducted with The Bapucharya, a giggling videotape Hindu guru. Ah, the elephant, the Hindu god Ganesh seeking reality beyond the illusory facade of maya! But, being Stone, the dialog is laced with wry humor, parody, irony, is never didactic, always offbeat, amusing. How is this possible? Well, you'll have to read it yourself to find out and to have your sight restored. And if you don't make it all the way to Enlightenment, at the very least you will be wholeheartedly entertained while engaged in the quest.
Darksinger
Life as it takes place between a stairway and a ratty brown couch: ohmygoodness! So delightful. So full of a father's ups and downs culminating in his ultimate arrival. I could not put this down. I kept wandering "And then?". All the while, picking up eastern philosophy that I think will stay with me throughout my future, past and present. The inner life is as full of anything written by Chuck Palahniuk, the farce is as delirious as Christopher Moore and the philosophy as strong as Carlos Castaneda. And yet, this is a new voice filled with humor, love, and surprises. Paul Steven Stone, your Mom should listen to you from now on! It IS a book we want to read.