» » Herman Melville: Moby-Dick

Download Herman Melville: Moby-Dick fb2

by Nick Selby
Download Herman Melville: Moby-Dick fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Nick Selby
  • ISBN:
    0231115385
  • ISBN13:
    978-0231115384
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Columbia University Press (September 15, 1999)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1281 kb
  • ePUB format
    1592 kb
  • DJVU format
    1848 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    694
  • Formats:
    docx lit mbr azw


Herman Melville’s classic masterpiece tells the story of the wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship . Moby dick or the whale.

Herman Melville’s classic masterpiece tells the story of the wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg and Ahab intends to take revenge.

Herman Melville, Moby-Dick. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. by. Selby, Nick, 1964-. Melville, Herman, 1819-1891, Sea stories, American, Whaling in literature, Whales in literature. New York : Columbia University Press. Uploaded by on January 19, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Moby-Dick as Philosophy: Plato - Melville - Nietzsche. The huge range of critical debate about this monster of a novel confirms moby-dick's status as a vital exploration of the role of American ideology in defining modern consciousness. New Essays on Moby-Dick (The American Novel). Subsequent chapters deal with the "Melville Revival" of the 1920s and the novel's central place in American Studies.

Herman Melville book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Herman Melville: Moby-Dick as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Herman Melville - Moby Dick. Author(s): Nick Selby. Publisher: Red Globe Press. Subsequent chapters deal with the 'Melville Revival' of the 1920s and the novel's central place in the establishment, growth and reassessment of 'American Studies' in the 1940s and 1950s. The final chapters examine postmodern 'New Americanist' readings of the text, and how these provide us with new models for thinking about American culture.

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is sailor Ishmael's narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that on the ship's previous voyage bit off Ahab's leg at the knee. A contribution to the literature of the American Renaissance, the work's genre classifications range from late Romantic to early Symbolist.

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is a novel by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is considered to be one of the Great American Novels. The story tells the adventures of wandering sailor Ishmael, and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab has one purpose on this voyage: to seek out Moby Dick, a ferocious, enigmatic white sperm whale. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab’s boat and bit off his leg, which now drives Ahab to take revenge. More Herman Melville albums.

Celebrated American author Herman Melville wrote 'Moby-Dick' and several other sea-adventure . Moby-Dick, categorized as American Romanticism, is based on both Melville's years of experience aboard whaleships and the real-life disaster of the Essex whaleship.

Celebrated American author Herman Melville wrote 'Moby-Dick' and several other sea-adventure novels before turning to poetry later in his literary career. Who Was Herman Melville? Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819. Traveling from Nantucket, Massachusetts, to South America, the Essex met its doom in the Pacific Ocean in November 1820, when a sperm whale attacked and destroyed the ship.

This Columbia Critical Guide starts with extracts from Melville's own letters and essays and from early reviews of Moby-Dick that set the terms for later critical evaluations. Subsequent chapters deal with the "Melville Revival" of the 1920s and the novel's central place in the establishment, growth, and reassessment of American Studies in the 1940s and 1950s. The final chapters examine postmodern New Americanist readings of the text, and how these provide new models for thinking about American culture.