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by Donald Pizer
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Donald Pizer
  • ISBN:
    0807122203
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807122204
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    LSU Press; Revised ed. edition (September 1, 1997)
  • Pages:
    149 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    4.3
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How these expatriates interpreted and gave modernist shape to the myth of the Paris moment in their writing is the . As Pizer demonstrates, Paris between the two world wars was for the American expatriates more than a geographical entity.

How these expatriates interpreted and gave modernist shape to the myth of the Paris moment in their writing is the altogether fresh focus of Donald Pizer’s study of seven of their major works. Pizer elucidates a striking difference between the genres of expatriate autobiography and fiction, and arranges his discussion accordingly. It was a state of mind, an experience, that engendered the formal expression of a personal aesthetic.

How these expatriates interpreted and gave modernist shape to the myth of "the Paris moment" in their writing is the altogether fresh focus of Donald Pizer's study of seven of their major works

How these expatriates interpreted and gave modernist shape to the myth of "the Paris moment" in their writing is the altogether fresh focus of Donald Pizer's study of seven of their major works. Most important, he addresses the neglected question of how the portrayal of the Paris scene helps shape a specific work's themes and form

Start by marking American Expatriate Writing and the Paris Moment . How these expatriates interpreted and gave modernist shape to the myth of "the Paris moment" in their writing is the altogether fresh focus of Donald Pizer's study of seven of their major works.

Start by marking American Expatriate Writing and the Paris Moment: Modernism and Place as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Through the freedom of thought and action it permitted and the richness of life it offered, nurtured the full expression of the creative imagination.

Are you sure you want to remove American expatriate writing and the Paris moment from your list? . by Donald Pizer Series.

Are you sure you want to remove American expatriate writing and the Paris moment from your list? American expatriate writing and the Paris moment. Published 1996 by Louisiana State University Press in Baton Rouge.

General American Literary Criticism Books . This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Report incorrect product info or prohibited items. The engaging and significant interplay between artist, place and innovative self-reflexive forms composes, Pizer maintains the most distinctive contribution of expatriate writing to the literary movement called high modernism.

Donald Pizer, American Expatriate Writing and the Paris Moment: Modernism and Place (Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1996), p. xiii

Donald Pizer, American Expatriate Writing and the Paris Moment: Modernism and Place (Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1996), p. xiii. A more sceptical, but also more limited, view of American writers in Paris can be found in Joseph H. McMahon's essay 'City for Expatriates', Yale French Studies, 32 (1964), pp. 144-58. American Expatriate Writing.

Louisiana State University Press. This item appears on. List: American Fiction: Self and Nation, 1865-1939. Section: Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms.

Journal of American Studies. Donald Pizer, American Expatriate Writing and the Paris Moment: Modernism and Place (London: Louisiana State University Press, 1996, £2. 0).

MFS Modern Fiction Studies, Volume 43, pp 467-471; doi:10. Keywords: American Expatriate, Expatriate Writing, Paris Moment, Cultural Re, Modern Lives, Re Reading, Lost Generation, modernism. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Montparnasse and its café life, the shabby working-class area of the place de la Contrescarpe and the Pantheon, the small restaurants and cafés along the Seine, and the Right Bank world of the well-to-do . . . for American writers self-exiled to Paris during the 1920s and 1930s, the French capital represented what their homeland could not: a milieu that, through the freedom of thought and action it permitted and the richness of life it offered, nurtured the full expression of the creative imagination. How these expatriates interpreted and gave modernist shape to the myth of “the Paris moment” in their writing is the altogether fresh focus of Donald Pizer’s study of seven of their major works.

Pizer elucidates a striking difference between the genres of expatriate autobiography and fiction, and arranges his discussion accordingly. He first examines Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, Gertrude Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, and The Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1931–1934, all of which depict the emergence and triumph of the creative imagination within the Paris context. He then turns to Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, John Dos Passos’ Nineteen-Nineteen, and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender Is the Night, which dramatize the tragic potential in seeking a richness and intensity of creative expression within the city’s setting. Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer, a relatively late example of American expatriate writing, constitutes a synthesis of the two tendencies, Pizer shows.

Through careful readings of the texts, Pizer identifies both the common threads in the expatriates’ response to the Paris moment and the distinctive expression each work gives to their shared experience. Most important, he addresses the neglected question of how the portrayal of the Paris scene helps shape a specific work’s themes and form. He traces such experimental devices as fragmented or cubistic narrative forms, the dramatic representation of consciousness, and sexual explicitness, and explores the powerful and evocative tropes of mobility and feeding.

As Pizer demonstrates, Paris between the two world wars was for the American expatriates more than a geographical entity. It was a state of mind, an experience, that engendered the formal expression of a personal aesthetic. The engaging and significant interplay between artist, place, and innovative self-reflexive forms composes, Pizer maintains, the most distinctive contribution of expatriate writing to the literary movement called high modernism.