Download Don Juan fb2

by Molière,Neil Bartlett
Download Don Juan fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Molière,Neil Bartlett
  • ISBN:
    1840024399
  • ISBN13:
    978-1840024395
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oberon Books (September 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    96 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1123 kb
  • ePUB format
    1991 kb
  • DJVU format
    1252 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    808
  • Formats:
    doc lrf lit rtf


Molière is one of the greatest writers of comedy of all time.

Molière is one of the greatest writers of comedy of all time.

Don Juan playing the women; all his heartless, godless talk; his servant's judgment against him - more vividly drawn here than I've ever seen it before. If I ever used my degree in teaching high school English, I'd throw out Romeo and Juliet and have my students read this version of Don Juan. Girls, know that the average teenage boy thinks just like this, and stay away from these heartless males until they've matured and learned some basic human decency.

Director Neil Bartlett's translations include plays by Molière, Racine, Marivaux, Labiche and von Kleist. Adaptations include A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations and Camille

Director Neil Bartlett's translations include plays by Molière, Racine, Marivaux, Labiche and von Kleist. Adaptations include A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations and Camille. Oberon Books also publishes Solo Voices and Queer Voices, two collections of his monologues, and his plays In Extremis and Or You Could Kiss Me, both of which were first staged at the National Theatre.

Neil Bartlett's new translation brings out all the dark undercurrents of Molière's wickedly black comedy.

He's a beast I tell you – a real animal What happens when you've lived only for pleasure, and you finally run out of time? When you've broken every promise, outraged every decency and slept your way through half of Europe – where do you turn as the clock starts to tick towards midnight? Neil Bartlett's new translation brings out all the dark undercurrents of Molière's wickedly black comedy. Poetry & Drama Plays. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Dom Juan or The Feast with the Statue is a French play, a comedy in five acts, written by Molière, and based on the legend of Don Juan. The title of Molière's play is also commonly expressed as Don Juan, a spelling that began in the seventeenth century. Molière's characters Dom Juan and Sganarelle are the French counterparts to the Spanish Don Juan and Catalinón, characters who are also found in Mozart's Italian opera Don Giovanni as Don Giovanni and Leporello.

BY NEIL BARTLETT found in the catalog. Are you sure you want to remove DON JUAN; TRANS. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. from your list? Don juan; trans.

Neil Bartlett was born in 1958 in Hertfordshire, and is a writer, playwright, translator .

Neil Bartlett was born in 1958 in Hertfordshire, and is a writer, playwright, translator, performer and director. His most recent novels are Skin Lane (2007), shortlisted for the 2007 Costa Novel Award, and The Disappearance Boy (2014). He has also written several short stories. His published adaptations and translations for the theatre include Molière's The Misanthrope (1990), staged at the Goodman, Chicago; The School for Wives (1990), produced at Derby Playhouse; Racine's Bérénice (1990), staged at the National Theatre; Marivaux's The Game of Love and Chance (1992), staged at the National Theatre; Genet's Splendid's.

One of Molière's best-known plays, Don Juan was written while Molière's classic tale of the Seducer of Seville, an uproariously funny story flawlessly translated by the Pulitzer Prize winning poet. Don Juan, the "Seducer of Seville," originated as a hero-villain of Spanish folk legend, is a famous lover and scoundrel who has made more than a thousand sexual conquests. Sadly, with Don Juan, I believe that I have now read all of Richard Wilbur's translations of French drama. Then again, I had thought that years ago and they recently started republishing ones I hadn't read. So maybe I will be pleasantly surprised by some more translations. Sadly also, this is the only Wilbur translation that has any false notes, specifically the dialogue of the rustic peasants in Act II sounds anachronistic and tinny, with phrases like "Hell's bells.

Neil Bartlett's new translation brings out all the drk undercurrents of Moliere's wickedly black comedy.

Authis
I never realized how FUNNY this play was until my son came home telling me I had to read this new translation he'd happened across at the library. Now I have to buy a copy, I love it so much. The play itself seems rather hurried, and the ending is quite abrupt -- boom, the door to hell opens beneath his feet, and Don Juan plunges to his eternal torment. I suppose live, on stage, the scene would last longer and convey immense visual appeal and shock value. As written, it feels sort of lame.

But the dialogue -- Don Juan's servant (whose name I can't pronounce) -- hilarious! Dodging the debt collectors is a great scene (and comes back at the ending). Don Juan playing the women; all his heartless, godless talk; his servant's judgment against him -- more vividly drawn here than I've ever seen it before.

If I ever used my degree in teaching high school English, I'd throw out Romeo and Juliet and have my students read this version of Don Juan. Girls, know that the average teenage boy thinks just like this, and stay away from these heartless males until they've matured and learned some basic human decency. {Oh, come on, guys, you think I don't know that most of you would rather be like Don Juan than the fine, upstanding citizens you are?} --Never mind. Shakespeare's plays might be tightly constructed and plotted, but I think teenagers would understand (or personally know) a villain like Don Juan more readily than a Hamlet or Othello.

Bring on the Don!
Biaemi
I saw this translation (directed by Wadsworth himself!) performed at the Shakespeare Theater in Washington DC, and immediately pre-ordered it upon returning home.

Most of the other translations of this play have been rather bulky and awkward, but Wadsworth captures Moliere's very, very clever and biting wit. I can't sing enough of it's praises. For me, it was just perfect; Don Juan is devastingly charming, right up until the very end. I can't wait until it arrives!