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by Stacy Gillis,Philippa Gates
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Stacy Gillis,Philippa Gates
  • ISBN:
    0313316554
  • ISBN13:
    978-0313316555
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Praeger (October 18, 2001)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
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The Devil Himself book. This study will interest scholars of 19th and 20th century literature, of film, and of popular culture

The Devil Himself book. This study will interest scholars of 19th and 20th century literature, of film, and of popular culture. Each chapter concludes with a select bibliography and filmography, where applicable.

Stacy Gillis, Philippa Gates. This study of the villain in detective fiction and film examines such questions as what the villains reflect about the heroes, what they reflect about society, and what defines villainous activity

Stacy Gillis, Philippa Gates. This study of the villain in detective fiction and film examines such questions as what the villains reflect about the heroes, what they reflect about society, and what defines villainous activity. The texts discussed span the end of the 18th through the 20th century and range from Charles Brockden Brown's Weiland (1798) to the film Se7en (1995). As the villains reflect the changing ethics of society, the shift in such nebulous moral boundaries can be traced through the changing depictions of these dark characters

Villainy in Detective Fiction and Film (Contributions to the Study of Popular Culture).

Villainy in Detective Fiction and Film (Contributions to the Study of Popular Culture). Published October 18, 2001 by Greenwood Press. Detective and mystery films, Villains in motion pictures, Popular literature, English Detective and mystery stories, Evil in literature, History and criticism, American Detective and mystery stories, Evil in motion pictures, Villains in literature. English-speaking countries.

Detecting Men: Masculinity and the Hollywood Detective Film SUNY series, Cultural Studies in Cinema/Video SUNY series, Cultural Studies in Cinema/Video.

The Devil Himself: Villainy in Detective Fiction and Film. British Journal of Canadian Studies 17 (2), 186-196, 2004. Praeger Pub Text, 2002. The Three Sam Spades: The Shifting Model of American Masculinity in the Three Films of" The Maltese Falcon". Framework: The Journal of Cinema and Media 49 (1), 7-26, 2008. Contributions to the study of popular culture 73, 183-196, 2002. Criminal Investigation on Film. A Companion to Crime Fiction, 344-355, 2010. Softboiled Heroes: Investigating Englishness in the Classical Hollywood Detective Film.

Stacy Gillis (ed. with Philippa Gates) THE DEVIL HIMSELF: Villainy in Detective Fiction and Film

Stacy Gillis (ed. with Philippa Gates) THE DEVIL HIMSELF: Villainy in Detective Fiction and Film. Notes on Contributors.

Publication type: Authored Book. Publication status: Published. Series Title: Contributions to the Study of Popular Culture. Number of Pages: 232. Publisher: Praeger. Place Published: United Kingdom.

Her publications include contributions to The Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction (2009) and an article forthcoming in The Journal of. .Philippa Gates is an Associate Professor in Film Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada.

Her publications include contributions to The Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction (2009) and an article forthcoming in The Journal of Narrative Theory. Karen Fang is the author of John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow, one of the New Hong Kong Cinema series from Hong Kong University Press (2004). An Associate Professor of English at the University of Houston, she also writes on British Romantic litera-ture, and is currently at work on a book on policing in Hong Kong cinema.

Monsters, Mushroom Clouds, and the Cold War: American Science Fiction and the Roots of Postmodernism, 1946-1964 by M. Keith Booker.

The idea of making a deal with the devil has appeared many times in works of popular culture. The theme enjoyed a large run of popularity in the 20th century.

This study of the villain in detective fiction and film examines such questions as what the villains reflect about the heroes, what they reflect about society, and what defines villainous activity. The texts discussed span the end of the 18th through the 20th century and range from Charles Brockden Brown's Weiland (1798) to the film Se7en (1995). As the villains reflect the changing ethics of society, the shift in such nebulous moral boundaries can be traced through the changing depictions of these dark characters. Correspondingly, essays address issues of gender, genre, race, and class. In addition to Weiland and Se7en, books and films discussed include Dickens's Bleak House, Wilkie Collins's The Woman in White, the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the films of Alfred Hitchcock, the James Bond novels and films, the novels of P.D. James, Ruth Rendell, and Dorothy Sayers, A. S. Byatt's Possession, Patricia Conrwall's Scarpetta mysteries, Margaret Atwood's Robber Bride, and the movie The Usual Suspects.

As one of the most successful literary genres, detective fiction appeals to a wide audience. This study will interest scholars of 19th and 20th century literature, of film, and of popular culture. Each chapter concludes with a select bibliography and filmography, where applicable.