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by EMILY ALLEN
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    EMILY ALLEN
  • ISBN:
    0814209319
  • ISBN13:
    978-0814209318
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ohio State University Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    250 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1744 kb
  • ePUB format
    1917 kb
  • DJVU format
    1268 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    943
  • Formats:
    mobi doc mbr txt


THEATER FIGURES book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

THEATER FIGURES book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking THEATER FIGURES: PRODUCTION OF 19TH CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Victorian Novel and Theatre. She is the author of Theater Figures: the Production of the Nineteenth-Century British Novel (2003). The Oxford Handbook of the Victorian Novel.

Chicago Distribution Center. Antiquarianism as a Vital Historiography for the Twenty-First Century. Mary Jean Corbett, "Theater Figures: The Production of the Nineteenth-Century British Novel by Emily Allen," The Wordsworth Circle 35, no. 4 (Autumn 2004): 172-174. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Science and Human Animality in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

the production of the nineteenth-century British novel. Published 2003 by Ohio State University Press in Columbus.

Emily Allen’s beautifully written and cogently argued Theater Figures belongs in this group and makes an important contribution to it, for it tracks the figure of the theater over the course of the nineteenth century as it functions variously in the consolidation of the modern literary hierarchy

Emily Allen’s beautifully written and cogently argued Theater Figures belongs in this group and makes an important contribution to it, for it tracks the figure of the theater over the course of the nineteenth century as it functions variously in the consolidation of the modern literary hierarchy. Allen is utterly persuasive in making the case that novelists from Frances Burney, Jane Austen and Sir Walter Scott, to Charles Dickens, Mary Braddon and George Moore, use the theater to define the domestic novel, partly because she has selected her figures and texts with an unerring eye.

At the beginning of the 19th century, there were only two main theatres in London. Emeritus Professor Jacky Bratton traces the development of theatre throughout the century, exploring the proliferation of venues, forms and writers

At the beginning of the 19th century, there were only two main theatres in London. Emeritus Professor Jacky Bratton traces the development of theatre throughout the century, exploring the proliferation of venues, forms and writers. By 1800 there were not enough theatres in London for the explosively-growing population. The existing theatrical spaces, where the old civic community was arranged in box, pit and gallery, were under huge strain.

Professor Emily Allen is Associate Professor of English at Purdue University, where her primary scholarly area is 19th-century British literature, particularly the novel. She also teaches in the comparative literature, women's studies, and theory and cultural studies programs. She is the author of Theater Figures: The Production of the Nineteenth-Century British Novel and articles on 18th- and 19th-century topics, from the history of melodrama to the design of Victorian wedding cakes.

Emily Allen, Theater Figures: Production of 19th Century British Novel (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2003), 17Google Scholar. 29. Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, ed.

Nineteenth-century theatre describes a wide range of movements in the theatrical culture of Europe and the United States in the 19th century

Nineteenth-century theatre describes a wide range of movements in the theatrical culture of Europe and the United States in the 19th century. In the West, they include Romanticism, melodrama, the well-made plays of Scribe and Sardou, the farces of Feydeau, the problem plays of Naturalism and Realism, Wagner's operatic Gesamtkunstwerk, Gilbert and Sullivan's plays and operas, Wilde's drawing-room comedies, Symbolism, and proto-Expressionism in the late works of August Strindberg and Henrik Ibsen.

Crusoe’s world-famous novel is a complex literary confection, and it’s irresistible. 3. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift (1726). A satirical masterpiece that’s never been out of print, Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels comes third in our list of the best novels written in English. 4. Clarissa by Samuel Richardson (1748). Tom Jones is a classic English novel that captures the spirit of its age and whose famous characters have come to represent Augustan society in all its loquacious, turbulent, comic variety.

Why did nineteenth-century novels return, over again, to the scene of theater? Emily Allen argues that theater provided nineteenth-century novels, novelists, and critics with a generic figure that allowed them to position particular novels and novelistic genres within a complex literary field. Novel genres high and low, male and female, public and private, realistic and romantic, all came to identify themselves within a set of coordinates that included--if only for the purpose of exclusion--the spectacular figure of theater. This figure likewise provided a trope around and against which to construct images of readers and authors, images that most frequently worked to mediate between the supposedly private acts of reading and writing and the very public facts of the print market. In readings of novels by Burney, Austen, Scott, Dickens, Jewsbury, Flaubert, Braddon, and Moore, Allen shows how frequently theater appears as figure in novels of the nineteenth century, and how theater figures--actively and importantly--in what we have come to look back on as the history of the nineteenth-century novel. "Theater Figures thus offers a new model for thinking about how theater helped produce changes in the nineteenth-century literary market. While previous critics have considered theater as an enabling foil for the novel--either a constitutive opposite or constructive ally--Allen demonstrates how theater figures and tropes were used to negotiate competition among the novels and novelists eagerly seeking their share of the literary limelight.