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by Barbara Goward
Download Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Barbara Goward
  • ISBN:
    0715627953
  • ISBN13:
    978-0715627952
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bristol Classical Press (March 15, 2003)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1340 kb
  • ePUB format
    1853 kb
  • DJVU format
    1905 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
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    563
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Telling Tragedy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Telling Tragedy book. Start by marking Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Start by marking Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Goward Telling Tragedy. Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. London: Duckworth, 1999. Goward Telling Tragedy.

Apart from a small number of specialized studies which aim to explore ancient plays from a purely narratological perspective, while at the same time presuming that plays are indeed composites of implicit meanings and historical allusions given material embodiment in formal patterns and technical devices [B. Goward (1999), Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides (London), . Tragic narratives combine heroic and historical values, fiction and non-fiction.

Using recent narrative theory, this book explores the narrative strategies that sustain the complex relationship between the tragic poet and . Greek tragedy stages stories - ones already thoroughly familiar to their original audiences.

Using recent narrative theory, this book explores the narrative strategies that sustain the complex relationship between the tragic poet and his sophisticated audience. It discusses how these sprawling stories were typically shaped by Aeschylus into suspenseful dramatic form; and then, once narrative patterns had become established, how these patterns were successively adapted, subverted, capped or ignored by Sophocles and Euripides in the annual attempt to recreate suspense and express fresh meanings relevant to the difficult last decades of the fifth century.

Similar books and articles. Translations of Greek Tragedy Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Euripides, Medea: Translated by R. C. Trevelyan. Pp. 47, 57. Cambridge: University Press, 1939.

As a creative medium, ancient Greek tragedy has had an extraordinarily wide influence: many of the surviving . Telling tragedy: narrative technique in Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides Barbara Goward Snippet view - 1999.

As a creative medium, ancient Greek tragedy has had an extraordinarily wide influence: many of the surviving plays are still part of the theatrical repertoire, and texts like Agamemnon, Antigone, and Medea have had a profound effect on Western culture. This Companion is not a conventional introductory textbook but an attempt, by seven distinguished scholars, to present the familiar corpus in the context of modern reading, criticism, and performance of Greek tragedy.

Telling Tragedy has been added to your Cart. a wide-ranging, thought-provoking book, and given its broad scope it successfully manages to illuminate several aspects of the narrative strategies employed by Aeschuylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

She is the author of Telling Tragedy: Narrative Technique in Aeschylus, Sophocies and Euripides, published by Duckworth, and of the new Introduction to Trachiniae in the Bristol Classical Press reissue of . Jebb's Sophocies: Plays (2004).

Using recent narrative theory, this book explores the narrative strategies that sustain the complex relationship between the tragic poet and his sophisticated audience. It discusses how Aeschylus typically shaped these sprawling stories into dramatic form. Then, once established, how these patterns were successively adapted, subverted, capped or ignored by Sophocles and Euripides in the annual attempt to recreate suspense and express fresh meanings relevant to the difficult last decades of the fifth century.