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by Ovid,Garth Tissol
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Ovid,Garth Tissol
  • ISBN:
    052181958X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521819589
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (May 12, 2014)
  • Pages:
    202 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    1740 kb
  • ePUB format
    1945 kb
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    1143 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    866
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Ovid: Epistulae ex Ponto. Garth Tissol, Professor of Classics at Emory University, is the author of The Face of Nature: Wit, Narrative, and Cosmic Origins in Ovid's Metamorphoses (1997) as well as articles on Ovid, Virgil and Dryden's translations of Latin literature. Series: Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics.

Series: Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics. Subjects: Classical Literature, Classical Studies. The introduction examines the literary background of the Epistulae ex Ponto, their relation to Ovid's earlier works, and their special interest and appeal to readers of Augustan poetry.

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Ovid: Epistulae ex Ponto Book I. Ovid. Menander: Samia (The Woman from Samos).

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TISSOL (E., OVID: EPISTULAE EX PONTO, BOOK I (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics). Our Latin and Greek helped to make us what we became. And later, in various ways, we repay the compliment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. ix + 191. isbn 9780521819589 (bound); 9780521525626 (paper).

After five books of Tristia, he composed a collection of verse letters, the Epistulae ex Ponto, in which he appeals to his friends and supporters in Rome, lamenting his lot and begging for their help in When Ovid, already renowned for his love poetry, the Metamorphoses and other works, was exiled by Augustus to Tomis on the Black Sea in AD 8, he. continued to write.

Reading Ovid in his native Latin is always delightful, and this book includes what most Latin readers need to fully appreciate the experience. It is a worthy representative of the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics series. Although the Epistles of Ovid's exile often receive less attention than the poet's amorous elegies, not to mention his Metamorphoses, they are interesting and enjoyable works in their own right.

BEGINNER’S LATIN BOOK - Textkit Greek and Latin. 46 MB·2,360 Downloads. BEGINNER’S LATIN BOOK WILLIAM C. COLLAR AND M. GRANT DANIELL This public domain grammar The Beginn. Awakening the Third Eye. 280 Pages·2008·1. 46 MB·77,701 Downloads.

When Ovid, already renowned for his love poetry, the Metamorphoses and other works, was exiled by Augustus to Tomis on the Black Sea in AD 8, he continued to write. After five books of Tristia, he composed a collection of verse letters, the Epistulae ex Ponto, in which he appeals to his friends and supporters in Rome, lamenting his lot and begging for their help in mitigating it. In these epistolary elegies his inventiveness flourishes no less than before and his imaginative self-fashioning is as ingenious and engaging as ever, although in a minor key. This commentary on Book I assists intermediate and advanced students in understanding Ovid's language and style, while guiding them in the appreciation of his poetic art. The introduction examines the literary background of the Epistulae ex Ponto, their relation to Ovid's earlier works, and their special interest and appeal to readers of Augustan poetry.

Zodama
Reading Ovid in his native Latin is always delightful, and this book includes what most Latin readers need to fully appreciate the experience. Users of the Cambridge "Green and Yellows" will recognize the usual format, beginning with an English introduction to the work, followed by the Latin text, and completed with significant commentary in the endnotes. Although the Epistles of Ovid's exile often receive less attention than the poet's amorous elegies, not to mention his Metamorphoses, they are interesting and enjoyable works in their own right. The editor introduces the background for all ten letters under individual headnotes, which also point out the interplay and occasional inconcinnity between these individualized letters. The remaining comments are thorough but not too dense for a proficient student. I found Peter Green's translation, "Ovid: the Poems of Exile" to be a useful alternative recourse for clarity with Latin as well as a collection embracing Ovid's other set of poems from exile, the Tristia. Overall, Tissol's commentary help the informed Latin reader get the most out of reading Ovid and enjoying, as much as one might, the carmina of his twilight years. 4.5 stars.
Agalen
Since this is a commentary on a classical text, none of the questions applies. The plot is certainly predictable, the mood is thoughtful, the pace is steady, and Ovid's whining about his exile is certainly one-dimensional. What a prospective buyer needs to know, however, is that this edition is authoritative, thorough, and useful for scholar and advanced student alike. It is a worthy representative of the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics series.