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by John Allen Paulos
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    John Allen Paulos
  • ISBN:
    0226650243
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226650241
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Chicago Pr; First Edition edition (September 1, 1980)
  • Pages:
    116 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1408 kb
  • ePUB format
    1533 kb
  • DJVU format
    1649 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    503
  • Formats:
    lrf txt docx azw


John Allen Paulos has written a number of books on Mathematics, and "Mathematics and Humor" was his first, published originally in 1980. It is a short book, at just a little over 100 pages, and that is with plenty of drawings and graphs.

John Allen Paulos has written a number of books on Mathematics, and "Mathematics and Humor" was his first, published originally in 1980. I had high hopes going into it of an interesting read, but it just didn't deliver.

John Allen Paulos at minimum gave the Numeracy movement a name through his book Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences. What may not be so obvious was Paulos’ strong interest in the relationship between mathematics and mathematicians on the one hand and humor and stand-up-comedian joke structures on the other. Innumeracy itself could be seen as a typically mathematical Gotcha joke on American culture generally

John Allen Paulos has written a number of books on Mathematics, and "Mathematics and Humor" was his first, published originally in 1980. Paulos has some interesting thoughts and ideas, but the writing was a detriment to the communication of his points to the reader

John Allen Paulos has written a number of books on Mathematics, and Mathematics and Humor was his first, published originally in 1980.

John Allen Paulos has written a number of books on Mathematics, and Mathematics and Humor was his first, published originally in 1980. I had high hopes going into it of an interesting read, but it just didn’t deliver. Paulos has some interesting thoughts and ideas, but the writing was a detriment to the communication of his points to the reader

Электронная книга "Mathematics and Humor: A Study of the Logic of Humor", John Allen Paulos. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте.

Электронная книга "Mathematics and Humor: A Study of the Logic of Humor", John Allen Paulos. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Mathematics and Humor: A Study of the Logic of Humor" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Mathematics and humor. by. Paulos, John Allen. Wit and humor - Philosophy. Chicago : University of Chicago Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

John Allen Paulos cleverly scrutinizes the mathematical structures of jokes, puns, paradoxes, spoonerisms, riddles . of the relationship between humor and mathematics.

John Allen Paulos cleverly scrutinizes the mathematical structures of jokes, puns, paradoxes, spoonerisms, riddles, and other forms of humor, drawing examples from such sources as Rabelais, Shakespeare, James Beattie, René Thom, Lewis Carroll, Arthur Koestler, W. C. Fields, and Woody Allen.

In Mathematics and Humor I explore the operations and structures common to humor and the formal sciences (logic, mathematics, and . Some merely manage to be dull. A few - like Paulos - are brilliant in an odd endeavor. Harvey Mindess, Los Angeles Times.

In Mathematics and Humor I explore the operations and structures common to humor and the formal sciences (logic, mathematics, and linguistics), ii) show how various notions from these sciences provide formal analogues for different sorts of jokes and joke schema, and iii) develop a mathematical model of jokes (joke schema) using ideas from "catastrophe theory". In accomplishing this I discuss self-reference, recursivity, axioms, logical levels, non-standard models, transformational grammar, and several "mathematical" (in an extended sense) ideas.

John Allen Paulos cleverly scrutinizes the mathematical structures of jokes, puns, paradoxes, spoonerisms, riddles, and other forms of humor, drawing examples from such sources as Rabelais, Shakespeare, James Beattie, Ren Thom, Lewis Carroll, Arthur Koestler, W.

Download PDF book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Mathematics and humor John Allen Paulos. Book's title: Mathematics and humor John Allen Paulos. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0226650251.

Analyzes the logical structure of various types of mathematical proofs and jokes, showing how humor and mathematics are related by common creative processes and discussing Thom's "catastrophe theory" to describe how switches, reversals, and jumps in meaning are used in humor

EROROHALO
John Allen Paulos has written a number of books on Mathematics, and "Mathematics and Humor" was his first, published originally in 1980. It is a short book, at just a little over 100 pages, and that is with plenty of drawings and graphs. I had high hopes going into it of an interesting read, but it just didn't deliver. Paulos has some interesting thoughts and ideas, but the writing was a detriment to the communication of his points to the reader.

In the introduction, Paulos looks at various definitions of humor from history, which usually involves a formula (non-mathematical formulas or ingredients for what is considered humorous). He then moves to look at some examples of mathematical proofs which are clever, and involve ingenuity, before looking at what he considers to be "a bridge between humor and mathematics" which is "brain teasers", trick problems, riddles, etc.

The next few chapters deal with looking at mathematical concepts and then looking at what types of humor fit into those categories. This includes applications of axioms and iteration, self-reference and paradox, grammar and philosophy. While some of those don't specifically sound like mathematical concepts, Paulos does demonstrate how they do relate to mathematical areas.

Paulos then introduces talks about a "Catastrophe Theory Model of Jokes and Humor", and this is the longest chapter in the book. Paulos discusses how humor, similar to the behavior of an animal, depends on how the situation is presented to the subject. Just as a animal might respond with fear or rage, depending on the circumstances surrounding an event, a person might find something humorous depending on the same.

Paulos finishes with a short wrap-up of the subject, and I think that this book is going to face its own Catastrophe Theory, in that how it is perceived by the reader is going to be based on the circumstances surrounding the event of reading it. I think it will depend largely on the background of the reader on whether they enjoy the book, or find it not very interesting. Paulos has failed to find a way to level-set the subject for the reader so that it delivers a consistent response to the book. I believe he has solved this problem, given the success of his later works.
Went Tyu
I wanted this book for two reasons--first, I read the Paulos' best selling book, Innumeracy, and second, I like both of the subjects.

Paulos begins with a brief chapter on definitions of humor by historical philosophers and writers. It's pretty interesting--what is it that makes something funny? His second chapter uses some mathematical and logical examples to help approximate what is going on in most examples of humor.

Paulos' main thesis seems to be that the most common example of humor deals with setting up the unexpected incongruity. One of his examples is great. A perverted old man leers at a young virgin girl and says, "What goes in dry and hard, yet comes out soft and wet?" The girl blushes. The old man replies, "Chewing gum." In this example, the joke implied axioms (answers to his question) which were quite different than his chewing gum answer. The greater this incongruity is, the better the punchline (which is why sexual connotations are often found funny).

Other chapters discuss variations on this theme, culminating in a theory of catastrophe involving dogs and the model for whether they will fight or run away when confronted. It's quite interesting.

I really enjoyed the book, and found it to be quite thought-provoking. Paulos does a great job of explaining many tough mathematical concepts, including Gödel's Theorem. I didn't fully understand Thom's Theorem at the end, but that's okay. One thing to be aware of is that the book is short and leaves you wanting more.

I think anybody interested in math will find this book entertaining, even if they're not particularly excited by humor. I do think interest in mathematics is requisite to enjoy this book, however.
Skillet
One thing that most people will appreciate in this book is a better understanding of their mathematics professor's strange sense of humor. I agree with the author that most mathematicians do show a certain, recognizable style of humor. He goes on to explain the ways that mathematical reasoning resembles, and therefore illuminates humor. This book provides an entertaining introduction to mathematical concepts and theory. I'm not sure that I would recommend it as highly on the other side--to comedians. This is more of a philosopher's approach to humor.
Gann
I thought it was an excellent, the style is concise and the book a pleasure to read. The following are true, despite the fact that they are generally contradictory: the ideas expressed are non-trivial, the mathematics the author refers to are advanced, the exposition is clear enough (I never studied catastrophe theory), and the comparisons (humor and math) are really not far-fetched. A really enjoyable and memorable read.
Xanna
I am by no means an expert on metaphysics but I thought it was great.