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by Martin Evans
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Martin Evans
  • ISBN:
    0801432111
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801432118
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cornell University Press (March 7, 1996)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
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Evans looks at the relationship between Paradise Lost and the pervasive colonial discourse of Milton's time. Evans bases his analysis on the literature of exploration and colonialism.

Evans looks at the relationship between Paradise Lost and the pervasive colonial discourse of Milton's time. The primary sources on which he draws range from sermons about the New World justifying colonization and exhorting virtue among colonists to promotional pamphlets designed to lure people and investment into the colonies.

Milton's Imperial Epic: Paradise Lost and the Discourse of Colonialism. Published by: Cornell University Press. There were many reasons for pondering the relationship between the Old World and the New as Milton turned his attention back to his long delayed plans for an epic poem in the late 1650s. To begin with, the Commonwealth’s war with Spain had rekindled anti Spanish sentiment, and writers in tune with the mood of the times were busy turning. out works based on the so-called black legend of Spanish brutality in South America.

Evans looks at the relationship between Milton's epic and the pervasive colonial discourse of Milton's time. Analyzing Paradise Lost against this background, Evans offers a new perspective on such fundamental issues as the narrator's shifting stance in the poem, the unique character of Milton's prelapsarian paradise, and the moral and intellectual status of Adam and Eve before and after the fall. From Satan's arrival in Hell to the expulsion from the garden of Eden, Milton's version of the Genesis myth resonates with the complex thematics of Renaissance colonialism.

Milton's Imperial Epic book. Milton's Imperial Epic: Paradise Lost and the Discourse of Colonialism. 0801432111 (ISBN13: 9780801432118).

Written during the crucial first phase of English empire-building in the New World, Paradise Lost registers the radically divided attitudes toward the settlement of America that existed in seventeenth-century Protestant England

Written during the crucial first phase of English empire-building in the New World, Paradise Lost registers the radically divided attitudes toward the settlement of America that existed in seventeenth-century Protestant England. Evans looks at the relationship between Milton's epic and the pervasive colonial discourse of Milton's time. The primary sources on which he draws range from sermons about the New World justifying colonization and exhorting virtue among colonists to promotional pamphlets.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Milton's Imperial Epic: Paradise Lost and the . Evans bases his analysis on the literature of exploration and colonialism

Evans bases his analysis on the literature of exploration and colonialism. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

-, Milton’s Imperial Epic: ‘Paradise Lost’ and the Discourse of Colonialism, Cornell University Press, 1996. Leah Sinanoglou Marcus, ‘The Milieu of Milton’s Comus: Judicial Reform at Ludlow and the Problem of Sexual Assault’, Criticism 25 (1983), 293–327

-, Milton’s Imperial Epic: ‘Paradise Lost’ and the Discourse of Colonialism, Cornell University Press, 1996. Stephen M. Fallon, Milton among the Philosophers, Cornell University Press, 1991. Stanley Eugene Fish, Surprised by Sin: the Reader in ‘Paradise Lost’, St Martin’s Press, 1967; University of California Press, 1971. Christopher Hill, Milton and the English Revolution, Faber and Faber, 1977. Leah Sinanoglou Marcus, ‘The Milieu of Milton’s Comus: Judicial Reform at Ludlow and the Problem of Sexual Assault’, Criticism 25 (1983), 293–327. Harinder S. Marjara, Contemplation of Created Things: Science in ‘Paradise Lost’, University of Toronto Press, 1992.

Milton's Imperial Epic: Paradise Lost and the Discourse of Colonialism. In the last three decades there have been a number of books devoted to the discursive consequences of the Discovery and its aftermath, the most recent being Stephen Greenblatt's Marvellous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World (1991), Eric Cheyfitz's The Poetics of Imperialism (1991), Jeffrey Knapp's An Empire Nowhere: England, America, and Literature from Utopia. to the Tempest (1992), . Elliott's The Old World and the New, 1492-1650, and Anthony Pagden's European Encounters with the New World (1993).

Ithaca: Cornell University Press. The New Historicism has shifted the focus of literary studies from diachronic matters-great authors, perennial ideas, genres, topoi, and influences-to syn­ chronic ones concerning "discourses. These are sets of ideological themes and linguistic practices that traverse a broad range of literary and non-literary texts.

Written during the crucial first phase of English empire-building in the New World, Paradise Lost registers the radically divided attitudes toward the settlement of America that existed in seventeenth-century Protestant England. Evans looks at the relationship between Milton's epic and the pervasive colonial discourse of Milton's time. Evans bases his analysis on the literature of exploration and colonialism. The primary sources on which he draws range from sermons about the New World justifying colonization and exhorting virtue among colonists to promotional pamphlets designed to lure people and investment into the colonies. Evans's research allows him to create a richly textured picture of anxiety and optimism, guilt and moral certitude.

The central question is whether Milton supported England's colonization or covertly attempted to subvert it. In contrast to those who attribute to Paradise Lost a specific political agenda for the American colonies, Evans maintains that Milton reflects the complexity and ambivalence of attitudes held by English society.

Analyzing Paradise Lost against this background, Evans offers a new perspective on such fundamental issues as the narrator's shifting stance in the poem, the unique character of Milton's prelapsarian paradise, and the moral and intellectual status of Adam and Eve before and after the fall. From Satan's arrival in Hell to the expulsion from the garden of Eden, Milton's version of the Genesis myth resonates with the complex thematics of Renaissance colonialism.