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by James Hogg
Download The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg, Fiction, Literary fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    James Hogg
  • ISBN:
    1592247857
  • ISBN13:
    978-1592247851
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Borgo Press (December 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    252 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1601 kb
  • ePUB format
    1916 kb
  • DJVU format
    1478 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    159
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf txt rtf


Confessions of a justified sinner/James Hogg. p. c. -(Everyman’s library).

Confessions of a justified sinner/James Hogg. Ten years later he explained, ‘it being a story replete with horrors, after I had written it I durst not venture to put my name to it’. What constitutes the horrors is devil-worship.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified .

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. His introductory essay sets out the idiosyncratic historical, theological and literary contexts of this marvellous novel in a lucid and authoritative manner, drawing on his intimate knowledge of recent Hogg scholarship. Simon Kövesi ). "Hunter presents the Confessions with accuracy and care, placing welcome emphasis on the deliberately perplexing nature of the work and Hogg's desire to unsettle and challenge us as readers.

Hogg was a shepherd poet, with only six months of formal education. The result is teasingly brilliant and prefigures some of postmodernism's best trickery. It also impresses as a piece of psychological realism, as Wringhim's personality is riven beyond his control. An entertaining ride with the devil.

James Hogg's sardonic novel follows a young man who, falling under the spell of a mysterious stranger who bears an uncanny likeness to himself, embarks on a career as a serial murderer

James Hogg's sardonic novel follows a young man who, falling under the spell of a mysterious stranger who bears an uncanny likeness to himself, embarks on a career as a serial murderer. The memoirs are presented by a narrator whose attempts to explain the story only succeed in intensifying its more baffling and bizarre aspects.

Книга жанра: Старинная литература, Старинная литература: Прочее. OF A JUSTIFIED SINNER

Книга жанра: Старинная литература, Старинная литература: Прочее. OF A JUSTIFIED SINNER. It appears from tradition, as well as some parish registers still extant, that the lands of Dalcastle (or Dalchastel, as it is often spelled) were possessed by a family of the name of Colwan, about one hundred and fifty years ago, and for at least a century previous to that period.

The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. One of the supreme masterpieces of Romantic fiction and Scottish literature, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner is a terrifying tale of murder and amorality, and of one man’s descent into madness and despair. James Hogg’s sardonic novel follows a young man who, falling under the spell of a mysterious stranger who bears an uncanny likeness to himself, embarks on a career as a serial murderer.

Way to go James Hogg! Either this book is so deep and complex that no one can actually fathom enough of it to. .

Way to go James Hogg! Either this book is so deep and complex that no one can actually fathom enough of it to pigeon-hole it in a convincing manner, or it is in fact, everything it says on the tin. Personally I saw this book as a good example of what might happen when you tell a lot of people that they have an unlimited card. Before you judge Hogg and consider this to be a plot cop-out, consider that this book, although basically ignored for ages, was totally ground breaking and introduced the world to a whole new selection of literary tools and devices.

James Hogg's masterpiece is as troublingly duplicitous as Wringhim himself, and was ignored and bowdlerized before becoming a hugely influential work of Scottish literature.

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest libraries. We hold over 13 million books, 920,000 journal and newspaper titles, 57 million patents and 3 million sound recordings

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest libraries. We hold over 13 million books, 920,000 journal and newspaper titles, 57 million patents and 3 million sound recordings. Open to everyone, the Library also offers exhibitions, events and a Treasures Gallery that displays over 200 items, including The Lindisfarne Gospel, Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook, Shakespeare’s First Folio, lyrics by The Beatles and the world’s earliest dated printed book, Diamond Sutra.

"I was born an outcast in the world, in which I was destined to act so conspicuous a part. My mother was a burning and a shining light. But she was married to a man all over spotted with the leprosy of sin. She fled from his embraces the first night after their marriage. . . ." James Hogg wrote about the supernatural powerfully and convincingly, especially in his best-known novel, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, published in 1824; it has been called "the greatest of all Scottish novels."


one life
The "justified sinner" of the title is a Scottish Calvinist who becomes convinced that God has saved him and he can't be unsaved no matter what he does. A figure who is a literary version of a (or the) devil, plays on this religious fanaticism and lures him to commit crimes, including murder. The protagonist is emotionally and intellectually bullied into his crimes, and his personality undergoes steady disintegration up to his death. The chilling picture is all too relevant to the fanatical terrorists of our own age, and though presented as a critique of Calvinism, the story clearly glances at the fanaticism of the French Revolution. The penetrating psychological portrait of this perfectly horrible character moved by an icily logical dogmatism to extreme and vicious crimes is brilliant conducted. But that doesn't begin to convey the complexity and richness of the book. It is presented as a manuscript discovered on a corpse interred by a pair of curious misbehavers, and it is framed by the editor's account of the central figure, based on a few documents and local tradition. The contrasts between his account and the "justified sinner's" own first-person account is both fascinating and disturbing. At the end, the editor returns and there follows a really baffling array of metafictional games. The editor presents a letter by "James Hogg" telling about the disinterment, and he and a friend go off to investigate, encountering none other than James Hogg himself, who sourly says he wants nothing to do with the whole thing! There's more, but I can't recommend this book highly enough in our murderously dogmatic times. Earl Miller's Penguin edition is excellent, though Ian Duncan's introduction for his World's Classics edition is excellent. But frankly, I think Adrian Hunter's edition for Broadview is the best choice (it has an excellent introduction and good supplementary material by Hogg and contemporaries, and the footnotes are where they belong, at the foot of the page, not buried in the back of the book).
krot
Three stars for the fist half and four stars for the second.

It took me a long while to get into this book, as the chapters (especially at the beginning) are very short, and it takes a long time for the story to really get going. Once it did, though, I enjoyed it.

The music between chapters was a nice touch, albeit one I probably would have appreciated more if I could have heard the music somehow (prime opportunity for the audiobook right there).

I also liked the way the book describes traditional music (I really want to go to a ceilidh now) and the way the speech patterns sounded authentically Irish.

I also want to note that I had a really hard time getting an angle on how old JJ was supposed to be. He seemed on the younger side, but then he was talking to his friend about going clubbing? So some confusion there. And the tone of the book is similarly ambiguous -- I'm not sure if it's the fairy-tale nature or what, but the book's not quite a MG but not quite a YA either. High Middle Grade, I suppose.

I remember a lot of buzz around this one when it came out, and I'm not sure that it was really all that, but it was a fun read.
Still In Mind
I loved this book so much that I'm adding it to my syllabus for Horror and Fantasy this fall. Hope they enjoy it, too. The genre is ... well, it's hard to put a finger on. Doppelgangers, mysterious estates, cases of mistaken identity...or are they... this novel has all the great hallmarks of Gothic literature with a heaping dose of Scots language thrown in for your daily bit of culture and linguistics. Hogg was a creative guy, that's for sure. This book needs to get more attention outside the British Isles.
Steep
Unexpected surprise. I was slow to gather all the facts. After becoming immersed in the delightful story line I figured that there was so much more fun to the family dynamics. I was highly suspicious of the policeman. BUT IT was an interesting and fun romp. This did come together and was a satisfying story. A little slow when jj entered the other side, but understandable given the time issue.

great mix of true and fantasy, and I loved the blend. Almost made me believe in the other world where time never passed.