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by Ewan Fernie,Simon Palfrey,Michael Witmore
Download Shakespearean Metaphysics (Shakespeare Now!) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Ewan Fernie,Simon Palfrey,Michael Witmore
  • ISBN:
    0826490441
  • ISBN13:
    978-0826490445
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Continuum; 1 edition (December 28, 2008)
  • Pages:
    156 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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ISBN-13: 978-0826490445. Series: Shakespeare Now!

Ewan Fernie is Professor and Chair of Shakespeare Studies at the Shakespeare Institute .

Ewan Fernie is a British scholar and writer. He is Professor, Fellow and Chair of Shakespeare Studies at the Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham. He is also Director of the pioneering 'Everything to Everybody' Project, a collaboration between the University of Birmingham and Birmingham City Council.

Shakespearean Metaphysics argues for Shakespeare's inclusion within a metaphysical tradition that opposes .

Shakespearean Metaphysics argues for Shakespeare's inclusion within a metaphysical tradition that opposes empiricism and Cartesian dualism. Through close readings of three major plays-The Tempest, King Lear and Twelfth Night-Witmore proposes that Shakespeare's manner of depicting life on stage itself constitutes an "answer" to metaphysical questions raised by later thinkers as Spinoza, Bergson, and Whitehead

His book Doing Shakespeare has been called "an original and . Palfrey's latest work is a collaborative novel written with fellow Shakespeare scholar Ewan Fernie. Shakespearean Metaphysics, by Michael Witmore (2008). Shakespeare's Modern Collaborators, by Lukas Erne (2008).

His book Doing Shakespeare has been called "an original and long-overdue resource for theatre scholar-artists. It was listed as an "International Book of the Year" in 2004 by the Times Literary Supplement. In the TLS, Jonathan Bate said that although the work was "sometimes wayward," the book was 'always provocative of serious thought'.

Shakespearean Metaphysics book

Shakespearean Metaphysics book. While he wasn't a philosopher, Shakespeare was obviously interested in 'ultimates' of Metaphysics is usually associated with that part of the philosophical tradition which asks about 'last things', questions such as: How many substances are there in the world? Which is more fundamental, quantity or quality? Are events prior to things, or do they happen to those things? While he wasn't a philosopher, Shakespeare was obviously interested in 'ultimates' of this sort.

Shakespearean Metaphysics, by Michael Witmore (2008).

Shakespeare in Parts was awarded the 2009 Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society's David Bevington Prize for best new book. YouTube Encyclopedic. Shakespeare's Double Helix, by henry S. Turner (2008). Academic Staff: Dr Simon Palfrey. English at Brasenose College.

First published in Britain by BBC Worldwide Ltd. 2003. Includes bibliographical references (p. 345-347) and index.

Metaphysics is usually associated with that part of the philosophical tradition which asks about 'last things', questions such as: How many substances are there in the world? Which is more fundamental, quantity or quality? Are events prior to things, or do they happen to those things? While he wasn't a philosopher, Shakespeare was obviously interested in 'ultimates' of this sort. Instead of probing these issues with argument, however, he did so with plays. Shakespearean Metaphysics argues for Shakespeare's inclusion within a metaphysical tradition that opposes empiricism and Cartesian dualism. Through close readings of three major plays - The Tempest, King Lear and Twelfth Night - Witmore proposes that Shakespeare's manner of depicting life on stage itself constitutes an 'answer' to metaphysical questions raised by later thinkers as Spinoza, Bergson, and Whitehead. Each of these readings shifts the interpretative frame around the plays in radical ways; taken together they show the limits of our understanding of theatrical play as an 'illusion' generated by the physical circumstances of production.