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by Diane Purkiss
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Diane Purkiss
  • ISBN:
    0814766862
  • ISBN13:
    978-0814766866
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    NYU Press; USA Pbk ed. edition (November 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    356 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1872 kb
  • ePUB format
    1503 kb
  • DJVU format
    1570 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    492
  • Formats:
    docx mobi azw lit


For, as Diane Purkiss explains in this engrossing history, ancient fairies were born of fear: fear of the dark, of death, and of. .

The child-killing demons and nymphs of these cultures are the joint ancestors of the medieval fairies of northern Europe, when fairy figures provided a bridge between the secular and the sacred.

Troublesome Things: A History of Fairies and Fairy Stories (Allen Lane History). Author of The Witch in History, Diane Purkiss was formerly Professor of English at Exeter University and is now Fellow and Tutor at Keble College, Oxford. Strange and Secret Peoples: Fairies and Victorian Consciousness. Paperback: 356 pages.

Diane PurkissAt the Bottom of the GardenSimilar books Fairy tales are one of the most enduring forms of literature, their plots retold and characters reimagined for centuries. In this elegant . ore.

Diane PurkissAt the Bottom of the GardenSimilar books. Books similar to At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things. At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things. The fairy tale may be one of the most important cultural and social influences on children's lives. But until Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, little attention had been paid to the ways in wh. Fairy tales are one of the most enduring forms of literature, their plots retold and characters reimagined for centuries.

Garden : A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins and Other Troublesome Things. Encyclopedia of Fairies: Hobgoblins, Brownies, Bogies, & Other Supernatural Creatures.

At the Bottom of the Garden : A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins and Other Troublesome Things. An Introduction to the Interpretation of Fairy Tales. Marie-Louise von Franz.

For, as Diane Purkiss explains in this engrossing history, ancient fairies were born of fear: fear of the dark, of death, and of other great rites of passage, birth and sex.

Written by. Diane Purkiss. Manufacturer: NYU Press Release date: 1 January 2001 ISBN-10 : 0814766838 ISBN-13: 9780814766835.

Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, and Other Troublesome Things.

I started with At the Bottom of the Garden, which professes itself to be A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, and Other Troublesome Things. Diane Purkiss pushes the boundaries of what can be defined as a fairy nearly beyond the breaking point, starting with Lamia, nymphs, and djinn. Diane Purkiss tried to reference modern books and movies, but couldn’t always get the details right, including saying that the only Sith in the original Star Wars trilogy was Darth Vader, and made easily refutable errors, like claiming Disney based their Tinkerbell on Marilyn Monroe (although the truth couldn’t easily be found on Snopes at the time, I’d still expect.

He asserted that in this manner, Ecstasies built on the work of the historian Norman Cohn (1915–2007) in his book . At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins and Other Troublesome Things. New York: New York University Press.

He asserted that in this manner, Ecstasies built on the work of the historian Norman Cohn (1915–2007) in his book Europe's Inner Demons (1975). The Night Battles: Witchcraft and Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Shaman of Oberstdorf: Chonrad Stoeckhlin and the Phantoms of the Night.

Troublesome Things: A History of Fairies and Fairy Stories

Troublesome Things: A History of Fairies and Fairy Stories. Fairies and Fairy Stories: A History. Original publication date. The child-killing demons and nymphs of these cultures are the joint ancestors of the medieval fairies of northern Europe, when fairy figures provided a bridge between the secular and the sacred. Fairies abducted babies and virgins, spirited away young men who were seduced by fairy queens and remained suspended in liminal states.

Furthermore, Sanders argued that "the main problem of the book could be poor translation from the original Hungarian. Purkiss, Diane (2000).

At the Bottom of the Garden is a history of fairies from the ancient world to the present. Steeped in folklore and fantasy, it is a rich and diverse account of the part that fairies and fairy stories have played in culture and society.

The pretty pastel world of gauzy-winged things who grant wishes and make dreams come true—as brought to you by Disney's fairies flitting across a woodland glade, or Tinkerbell’s magic wand—is predated by a darker, denser world of gorgons, goblins, and gellos; the ancient antecedents of Shakespeare's mischievous Puck or J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan. For, as Diane Purkiss explains in this engrossing history, ancient fairies were born of fear: fear of the dark, of death, and of other great rites of passage, birth and sex. To understand the importance of these early fairies to pre-industrial peoples, we need to recover that sense of dread.

This book begins with the earliest manifestations of fairies in ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean. The child-killing demons and nymphs of these cultures are the joint ancestors of the medieval fairies of northern Europe, when fairy figures provided a bridge between the secular and the sacred. Fairies abducted babies and virgins, spirited away young men who were seduced by fairy queens and remained suspended in liminal states.

Tamed by Shakespeare's view of the spirit world, Victorian fairies fluttered across the theater stage and the pages of children's books to reappear a century later as detergent trade marks and alien abductors. In learning about these often strange and mysterious creatures, we learn something about ourselves—our fears and our desires.


Thordibandis
It seems as though Diane Purkiss tried to do too much. There are a lot of interesting tidbits here, and she starts off strong with an interesting thesis that the origin of fairy-type myths is actually in the demons of the Mediteranean, etc. rather than in Celtic beliefs. Unfortunately, while I think her purpose here was to provide a clear continuum of fairy beliefs to the present, her arguments get a bit muddled as she tries to gather together a lot of different fairy types/stories in one place, organized by historical time period, without exactly explaining where or how they fit with one another. There are no strong conclusions to tie the book together - if anything one ends up rereading the introduction to try and keep her chain of reasoning straight. I had difficulty getting through it and I am very interested in this kind of material. Try Katharine Briggs' Encyclopedia instead, if you can find it.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
i didn't know too much about fairy lore when i read this book. i knew the basics, a bit of tinkerbell, shakespeare's fairies, the fairy picture scam... and the like, but after reading diane purkiss's book, i feel a bit more aqauinted with the fairy world.
it's an interesting history, and i have nothing to compare it to in terms of thoroughness etc. i wasn't too particularly keen on her writing style, her asides were not very funny (i think she was trying to be humorous) and were jarring intermingled with the material. some of the sections were tedious to read, instead of retelling the old stories in a lot of places she had excerpts from the material, and they were annoying to trudge through (i've never been a fan of reading olde english).
for strict enjoyment purposes i would say don't get this, but if you are interested in fairy lore and really want to learn about it, then i say go ahead and get it. (i checked it out of the library...)
Kirizius
This book does not tell the story of the degeneration of the ancient and scary legends that gave birth to the Victorian flower fairies familiar to most people today. The author tends to begin sections with very (very) poor attempts at narrative to draw the reader in but that's it, the rest is analysis. However, I would like to emphasize that it is not scholarly analysis of any kind. The book is mostly a long and boring rant trying to look academic. The author keeps getting sidetracked into complaining about things she doesn't like which I wouldn't mind if it was at all interesting. It is also extremely repetitive. I made it to the chapter on nymphs before I realized that every single section was saying the exact same things over and over. I flipped to a random spot later and the book and saw the exact same statements and gave up trying to read it.

In short this book tries to do everything and so succeeds at nothing. It doesn't have the pull of a narrative, the academic pretensions spoil the ranting and the ranting discredits the attempt at scholarship.

I would love to read a good book, academic or otherwise, on the darker aspects of magical creatures. This is not it.
Zieryn
I'm surprized that some reviewers found this book "scholarly." I suppose it is, by the worst of current standards. Ms. Purkiss has some interesting insights into the history of fairy lore, but her book loses them in a mish-mash of affectation and Paglia-would-beism. Too bad. In one chapter Purkiss tries to take a photo in a "Fairy Store". The shop owner objects, "I won't let you take pictures! You'll just use them to open your own shop.' In vain I said that I had no intention of opening a fairy shop; in vain I flourished academic credentials. 'Anyone could say that!' she spat." Ms.Purkiss goes on to judge the "lady's" (arch condescension) values as "commercial." Hmm. (contact her literary agent for more info.) If you are interested in the debunking of fairy cuteness, try instead Sylvia Townsend Warner's wonderfully written "Kingdoms of Elfin."
felt boot
Faery lore is a complicated thing--a mishmash of myths, beliefs, and tales that don't always add up to a coherent whole. Much has been written about the connection between faeries and half-remembered indigenous gods, and about the possibility that faeries were actually an ancient race of humans banished to the wilds. The market is filled, today, with books of beautiful and sweet faeries. But there is no other book like this one.
Diane Purkiss's theory is that the faeries are reminiscent of the demons of the Mediterranean culture--the lamashtu who steals babies away into death, the lamia who seduces and devours men--and that faery lore deals with the same issues as these earlier myths. The faeries, she contends, were an explanation for why beautiful young people were taken away in illness and death. She tells heartbreaking stories of women who tortured and abandoned their sick babies, thinking them changelings; she disturbs us with the tale of Michael Cleary, who killed his wife and honestly seemed to believe his *real* wife would return to him now that he had disposed of the faery impostor. A far-fetched belief? Perhaps not; fairy stories of the time seemed to advocate just such actions. Purkiss takes us on an uncomfortable journey through the most brutal of faery myths, then into the Victorian age, when faeries became a symbol of idealized childhood. But there was a dark side to this as well--onstage "faeries" were played by street orphans who lived incredibly hard lives, and Barrie's _Peter Pan_ takes on a very different undertone when it comes out that the children in the play were based on children Barrie had known, who had *died young* and therefore stayed forever young.
I would have given this book five stars for its unique and disturbing perspective--it ought to be on the shelves of faery enthusiasts if only for balance--but I subtracted a star because Purkiss insists that her theory is the only valid way to look at the fairy-faith. There are many different beliefs that shaped the concept of the faery; I applaud Purkiss for digging into some of the darkest ones. But, as I said before, balance...balance...balance.