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by Carvel Collins,William Faulkner
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Carvel Collins,William Faulkner
  • ISBN:
    1578064716
  • ISBN13:
    978-1578064717
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Press of Mississippi (May 22, 2002)
  • Pages:
    139 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1861 kb
  • ePUB format
    1678 kb
  • DJVU format
    1443 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    519
  • Formats:
    mobi rtf lit mbr


The pieces in New Orleans Sketches broadcast seeds that would take root in later works.

The pieces in New Orleans Sketches broadcast seeds that would take root in later works. In their themes and motifs these sketches and stories foreshadow the intense personal vision and style that would characterize Faulkner’s mature fiction. In his trailblazing introduction, Carvel Collins often called Faulkner’s best-informed critic, illuminates the period when the sketches were written as the time that Faulkner was making the transition from poet to novelist. For the reader of Faulkner, Paul Engle wrote in the Chicago Tribune, the book is indispensable. Its brilliant introduction. is full both of helpful information. and of fine insights.

New Orleans Sketches book. In his trailblazing introduction, Carvel Collins often called "Faulkner's best-informed critic," illuminates the period when the sketches were written as the time that Faulkner was making the transition from poet to novelist. For the reader of Faulkner," Paul Engle wrote in the Chicago Tribune, "the book is indispensable.

New Orleans Sketches. Book Description: In 1925 William Faulkner began his professional writing career in earnest while living in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Published by: University Press of Mississippi. He had served a stint in the Royal Canadian Air Corps and while working in a New Haven bookstore had become acquainted with the wife of the writer Sherwood Anderson.

In 1925 William Faulkner began his professional writing career in earnest while living in the French Quarter of New Orleans

In 1925 William Faulkner began his professional writing career in earnest while living in the French Quarter of New Orleans. In 1925 William Faulkner began his professional writing career in earnest while living in the French Quarter of New Orleans. In his first six months in New Orleans, Faulkner made a commitment to fiction writing.

New Orleans Sketches declares seeds that might take root in later works. of their issues and motifs those sketches and tales foreshadow the serious own imaginative and prescient and elegance that might symbolize Faulkner's mature fiction. Carvel Collins (1912-1990), one of many finest experts on Faulkner's lifestyles and works, served at the schools of Harvard college, Massachusetts Institute of know-how, Swarthmore collage, and the college of Notre Dame, the place he was once the 1st to coach a path dedicated to Faulkner's writing. By William Faulkner,Carvel Collins.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for New Orleans Sketches by William Faulkner (Hardback .

In his first six months in New Orleans, Faulkner made his initial foray into serious fiction writing. Here in one volume are the pieces he wrote while in the French Quarter. Carvel Collins (1912-1990), one of the foremost authorities on Faulkner's life and works, served on the faculties of Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Swarthmore College, and the University of Notre Dame, where he was the first to teach a course devoted to Faulkner's writing.

William Faulkner: New Orleans Sketches. William Faulkner: The Unvanquished.

Carvel Collins, New York, Random House, 1968. FCVA William Faulkner Collections, University of Virginia Library. JFSA Jill Faulkner Summers Private Archive. NYPL New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations. ROUM Rowan Oak papers, University of Mississippi Library. This story appeared in The Saturday Evening Post, CCVII (29 Sept. 1934), 12–13, 80, 81, as the first in a promised series.

Faulkner made his debut as a published writer at the age of 21 with the poem "L'Après-midi d'un Faune", which appeared in The New Republic on August 6, 1919.

In 1925 William Faulkner began his professional writing career in earnest while living in the French Quarter of New Orleans. He had published a volume of poetry (The Marble Faun), had written a few book reviews, and had contributed sketches to the University of Mississippi student newspaper. He had served a stint in the Royal Canadian Air Corps and while working in a New Haven bookstore had become acquainted with the wife of the writer Sherwood Anderson.

In his first six months in New Orleans, where the Andersons were living, Faulkner made his initial foray into serious fiction writing. Here in one volume are the pieces he wrote while in the French Quarter. These were published locally in the Times-Picayune and in the Double Dealer.

The pieces in New Orleans Sketches broadcast seeds that would take root in later works. In their themes and motifs these sketches and stories foreshadow the intense personal vision and style that would characterize Faulkner's mature fiction. As his sketches take on parallels with Christian liturgy and as they portray such characters as an idiot boy similar to Benjy Compson, they reveal evidence of his early literary sophistication.

In praise of New Orleans Sketches, Alfred Kazin wrote in the New York Times Book Review that "the interesting thing for us now, who can see in this book the outline of the writer Faulkner was to become, is that before he had published his first novel he had already determined certain main themes in his work."

In his trailblazing introduction, Carvel Collins often called "Faulkner's best-informed critic," illuminates the period when the sketches were written as the time that Faulkner was making the transition from poet to novelist.

"For the reader of Faulkner," Paul Engle wrote in the Chicago Tribune, "the book is indispensable. Its brilliant introduction . . . is full both of helpful information . . . and of fine insights." "We gain something more than a glimpse of the mind of a young genius asserting his power against a partially indifferent environment," states the Book Exchange (London). "The long introduction . . . must rank as a major literary contribution to our knowledge of an outstanding writer: perhaps the greatest of our times."


invincible
In my opinion this gets where Faulkner was trying to go in Absalom! Absalom!. The latter is fascinating but frustrating, keeps almost as far away as its white characters from the truth it struggles to address.. Go Down Moses is funny, sly, richly and credibly detailed and without any preaching about it knocks you out with the folly of Southern culture's tragically over-determined attempts to draw a line between white and black and southerners, to separate people who were deeply culturally joined and as often as not genetically in-mixed as well. Hurrah for Faulkner in this one. Characters and "themes" interlace enough in these short stories to make them work together as a modernist novel. Faulkner in sly chunks about characters who know the insanity they live with is way easier to take and get than Faulkner in the lavish doses required by characters who just cannot wake up and see the lies they're living. I admire WF for being able to show both, but I enjoy the Go Down Moses style more. This is my favorite of his novels and I think would be the best for a reader to start with.
Dreladred
There are several stories, and I enjoyed them all. I had heard The Bear was the most well known, and I certainly enjoyed it and its exploration of man and nature. But the others are very good, memorable, and stand on their own. I have read more than half of Faulkner's works, and I was not disappointed. I heard people complain that the characters and their genealogy could interfere, but I did really care that I didn't have an exact picture of who was related to whom, who begat who. (There are detailed genealogical breakdowns on-line, and you could keep one handy if you really need to.) The writing of woods, the many hunts, weather, as well as the characters is just brilliant!
Yllk
This is the 6th or 7th William Faulkner book I've read over the years and they are consistent in a couple of ways: they are about the Old South, and they are worth the read if you can hang in. At his best, Faulkner is like poetry, but often also like a puzzle with one or two pieces missing. His stories usually start in the middle and then jump around time-wise; you are not always sure of whom he is talking about. Also, his existential view is a bit depressing: this is all there is, and there might be a god, but one who is really of no particular use. His sentences are run-on, poorly punctuated, convoluted, and sometimes a page or two long. BUT, if you can wade through all that, the stories are haunting or humorous but never boring. `Go Down Moses' generally gives personal highlights (or lowlights) of the 200-year history of a family that had both black and white branches descended from the same man. Faulkner has unusually keen insight into the racial tension that has plagued our country from even before the beginning, and it shows in his writings.

Faulkner is after all a Pulitzer Prize winner (twice) and even a Nobel Prize winner, and well worth the read - - if you can hang in. At least that is my take on it.
Bukus
Like all of Faulkner's works the language, structure, narrative....well everything can be confusing at times and it takes an extra effort to decipher it all. Go Down, Moses is particularly difficult because you have to navigate through seven interconnected stories involving one incredibly diverse, multi-generational family.
It is completely worth it the effort, however, because once it all comes together, it is simply one of the greatest American works ever written. I read this novel for an Literature of the American South course at University and this gives you a much more personal history of the reconstruction of the South than any textbook. At times hauntingly beautiful, at other times wonderfully transcendent, it is a magnificent and enthralling masterpiece.
Trash Obsession
If you think Faulkner is one of the great modernists, as I do - you will agree that this is an incredible novel. Faulkner's south in this novel, is a universal story of modern man's struggle with authority, with his history, with the radical changes that the modern world has brought. Most of these changes are for the good, some not - but in all cases, man's struggle to keep up with the change is both heroic and tragic.
Ydely
I read this book for a class, but I really loved its message and overall themes. Respect of the environment is a very important thing to learn and I'm sure it's hard to teach so putting it in a very livable context (the story of a southern family) is a nice way to consider it. Faulkner can be a bit wordy and hard to decipher on occasion, but I really enjoyed the book as a whole.
Fearlessrunner
As a long-time teacher of Faulkner, I bought this for a friend. Mainly because Faulkner wrote so many highly-regarded novels, _Go Down, Moses_ has suffered neglect, except for the superb "The Bear." Faulkner claimed this book is a novel, and I agree. For example, "The Bear" poses great difficulty for the reader to the point of giving up on it unless "stories" preceding it have been read. "The Fire and the Hearth" is almost a short novel, which can stand alone, but the reader would miss the richness of the work without the context of all the pieces. GDM is a saga about two important elements of southern fiction--race and relationships.