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by John Barsby,Terence
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    John Barsby,Terence
  • ISBN:
    067499597X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674995970
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press; Revised edition (December 15, 2001)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
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Loeb Classical Library 22. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Volume I contains a substantial introduction and three plays: The Woman of Andros, a romantic comedy; The Self-Tormentor, which looks at contrasting father-son relationships; and The Eunuch, whose characters include the most sympathetically drawn courtesan in Roman comedy. Loeb Classical Library 22.

Terence, Volume II. Phormio. Series: Loeb Classical Library (Book 22). Hardcover: 464 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0674995970. Product Dimensions: . x 1 x . inches.

We may also suspect structural change in the middle of The Eunuch, where the soldier-parasite pair, which Terence tells us in the prologue were imported from Menander’s The Flatterer, loom relatively large. Apart from this, our best clue to Terentian change is the presence of four speaking actors in a scene, contrary to Menander’s practice.

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The Self-Tormentor Are you sure you want to remove Terence, Volume I. The Woman of Andros. The Eunuch from your list?

Are you sure you want to remove Terence, Volume I. The Eunuch from your list? Terence, Volume I. by Publius Terentius Afer. Published December 15, 2001 by Loeb Classical Library. Loeb Classical Library No. 22.

Terence brought to the Roman stage a bright comic voice and a refined sense of style. Volume I contains a substantial introduction and three plays: The Woman of Andros, a romantic comedy; The Self-Tormentor, which looks at contrasting father-son relationships; and The Eunuch, whose characters include the most sympathetically drawn courtesan in Roman comedy.

Terence Volume I Loeb Classical Library 22. Terence brought to the Roman stage a bright comic voice and a refined sense of style. His six comedies-first produced in the half dozen years before his premature death in 159 BCE-were imaginatively reformulated in Latin plays written by Greek playwrights, especially Menander.

Terence, John Barsby. His six comedies - first produced in the half dozen years before his premature death in 159 . imaginatively reformulated in Latin plays written by Greek playwrights, especially Menander.

Barsby (e., Terence II. Phormio, The Mother-In-Law, The Brothers (Loeb Classical Library 23. Volume 93 - Sander M. Goldberg. A Woman of Thirty, Honoré de Balzac Note: The University of Adelaide Library eBooks @ Adelaide. Phormio, The Mother-In-Law, The Brothers (Loeb Classical Library 23). Pp. 375. ISBN 0-674-99598-8. Article in The Journal of Roman Studies 93:358 · November 2003 with 2 Reads. Cite this publication. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

Terence brought to the Roman stage a bright comic voice and a refined sense of style. His six comedies--first produced in the half dozen years before his premature death in 159 BCE--were imaginatively reformulated in Latin plays written by Greek playwrights, especially Menander. For this new Loeb Classical Library edition of Terence, John Barsby gives us a faithful and lively translation with full explanatory notes, facing a freshly edited Latin text.

Volume I contains a substantial introduction and three plays: The Woman of Andros, a romantic comedy; The Self-Tormentor, which looks at contrasting father-son relationships; and The Eunuch, whose characters include the most sympathetically drawn courtesan in Roman comedy. The other three plays are in Volume II: Phormio, a comedy of intrigue with an engaging trickster; The Mother-in-Law, unique among Terence's plays in that the female characters are the admirable ones; and The Brothers, which explores contrasting approaches to parental education of sons.

The Romans highly praised Terence--"whose speech can charm, whose every word delights," in Cicero's words. This new edition of his plays, which replaces the now outdated Loeb translation by John Sargeaunt (first published in 1912), succeeds in capturing his polished style and appeal.