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by Julie Plovnick,Bianca Yalom,Bianca Lamblin
Download A Disgraceful Affair: Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Bianca Lamblin fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Julie Plovnick,Bianca Yalom,Bianca Lamblin
  • ISBN:
    1555532519
  • ISBN13:
    978-1555532512
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Northeastern (March 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    1738 kb
  • ePUB format
    1348 kb
  • DJVU format
    1982 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    999
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A Disgraceful Affair book.

A Disgraceful Affair book. In this intimate memoir, Bianca Lamblin tells the story of her. In this intimate memoir, Bianca Lamblin tells the story of her menage a trois with Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, and their abandonment of her, a Jew, at the onset of World War II. Get A Copy.

Its carefully guarded sentences reveal a woman who has been deepley hurt by her mentors but who is being painstakingly careful in her effort to be fair as she sets the record straight.

Bianca Lamblin ; translated by Julie Plovnick.

The following year de Beauvoir passed Bianca on to her "essential partner," Jean-Paul Sartre. A Disgraceful Affair: Simone De Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Bianca Lamblin (Women's Life Writings from Around the World)

The following year de Beauvoir passed Bianca on to her "essential partner," Jean-Paul Sartre. The three formed a menage a trois until 1940, when Bianca was suddenly abandoned by her dual mentors and lovers. A Disgraceful Affair: Simone De Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Bianca Lamblin (Women's Life Writings from Around the World).

Bianca Lamblin (maiden name: Bienenfeld) was a French writer who was romantically involved with both Jean-Paul Sartre and his lifelong companion Simone . .A Disgraceful Affair: Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Bianca Lamblin - Women's Life Writings from Around the World by. Bianca Lamblin, Julie Plovnick (Translator).

In this book, Bianca accuses de Beauvoir of pimping for Sartre, yet at the . Sartre and to a lesser extent de Beauvoir are not without blame, but Lamblin, on reading the Letters, should have shrugged he.

In this book, Bianca accuses de Beauvoir of pimping for Sartre, yet at the same time she describes their "threesome" as a love triangle. Sartre and to a lesser extent de Beauvoir are not without blame, but Lamblin, on reading the Letters, should have shrugged her shoulders and said "Ah, la folie de jeunesse". More from The Irish Times.

Bianca Yalom; Julie Plovnick; Bianca Lamblin Disgraceful Affair: Simone De Beauvoir, Jean-Paul . Bianca Bienenfeld Lamblin's scathing indictment of her mentors'/lovers' callousness and cruelty in their "contingent" affairs.

Bianca Yalom; Julie Plovnick; Bianca Lamblin Disgraceful Affair: Simone De Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre and Bianca Lamblin (Women's Life Writings from Around the World . ISBN 13: 9781555532512. Disgraceful Affair: Simone De Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre and Bianca Lamblin (Women's Life Writings from Around the World . Bianca Yalom; Julie Plovnick; Bianca Lamblin.

Though Lamblin insists that revenge is not her object, plainly it is-and if she were a better writer, that might be an enlivening motive. But in a paradox unlikely to entertain or edify the reader, Lamblin seeks to justify herself morally without confiding the full details of her story. Anyone looking for rounded portraits of the players will not find them here. Sartre (""a very poor lover"") seems to have been a cold, machinating bully who, at their first encounter, ""was wearing a sort of faded blue T-shirt of questionable cleanness. A DISGRACEFUL AFFAIR: Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Bianca Lamblin". By. Get weekly book recommendations

Bianca Lamblin (born Bienenfeld) (April 1921 – 5 November 2011) was a French writer who was romantically involved with both Jean-Paul Sartre and his lifelong companion Simone de Beauvoir, for a number of years

Bianca Lamblin (born Bienenfeld) (April 1921 – 5 November 2011) was a French writer who was romantically involved with both Jean-Paul Sartre and his lifelong companion Simone de Beauvoir, for a number of years.

In this intimate memoir, Bianca Lamblin tells the story of her menage a trois with Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, and their abandonment of her, a Jew, at the onset . Translated by. Julie Plovnick.

In this intimate memoir, Bianca Lamblin tells the story of her menage a trois with Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, and their abandonment of her, a Jew, at the onset of World War II. Product Identifiers. Lc Classification Number.

Bianca Bienenfeld was a seventeen-year-old lycee student when she was seduced both intellectually and sexually by her philosophy professor, Simone de Beauvoir, in 1938. The following year de Beauvoir passed Bianca on to her "essential partner," Jean-Paul Sartre. The three formed a menage a trois until 1940, when Bianca was suddenly abandoned by her dual mentors and lovers. Their lack of concern for Bianca's fate as a Jew in occupied France made the abrupt break even more shattering for her. She began to suffer periodic bouts of severe depression linked not only to the Nazi horrors, but to the betrayal by de Beauvoir and Sartre.After World War II, Bianca Bienenfeld (now married to Bernard Lamblin) resumed a platonic friendship with de Beauvoir that lasted more than forty years, but the pain of the old, perturbing affair flooded back when, in 1990, she read de Beauvoir's posthumously published Letters to Sartre and War Journal. The intimate content of these books referred directly to Bianca in a tone of ridicule and contempt, and she finally discovered the full extent of de Beauvoir's deception.Now Bianca explodes with the true story behind her earlier relationship with the high priests of existentialism. Published here in English for the first time, her memoir reveals what it was like to be a third party in the "contingent" affairs of de Beauvoir and Sartre. Bianca's compelling narrative is not written out of revenge or retaliation. Rather, it is an eloquent, candid account of how de Beauvoir and Sartre influenced the shape of her life and how she survived a disgraceful affair that, when broken, almost broke her.Bianca's unique perspective on de Beauvoir and Sartre is the central focus of the book, but not the sole one. She writes about her love for her husband Bernard, who helped her recover. She also describes life during the dark times of German occupation, and recounts witnessing the battle of Vercors during the French Resistance. Her well-crafted and poignant memoir will appeal to scholars and general readers alike.

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On the surface, A Disgraceful Affair is Bianca Lamblin's account of her brief triangular relationship with Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre and how that affair affected her life long after Sartre's, then Beauvoir's, romantic interest waned. Its carefully guarded sentences reveal a woman who has been deepley hurt by her mentors but who is being painstakingly careful in her effort to be fair as she sets the record straight. Readers looking for juicy tidbits will need to look elsewhere (Lamblin describes Sartre as a charming wooer but an unskilled lover, and does not waste ink elaborating).
If the reader takes the facts as the author presents them--and there is nothing implausible or erractic in what Lamblin relates--what unfolds is a brief, startlingly clear reflection on what it means to evolve one's own workable philosophy of life based on the cards one is dealt and the living examples one has to choose from. After her rejection by her existentalist mentors, Lamblin consciously chose a conventional, slightly leftist, life. Her mentors' narcissism seems to have turned her away from a life focused on pursuing celebrity and getting published (aside from a few academic philosophy articles, A Disgraceful Affair is Lamblin's only published work, one she didn't begin writing until she was in her seventies and all the key figures in the story had died). Unlike her mentors, she chose to marry and have children, decisions that disturbed and disgusted Beauvoir.
Those looking for portraits of Sartre and Beauvoir should know that Beauvoir (unfortunately called "the Beaver" throughout the book, a nickname that might have been better left untranslated) is the more fully realized. Lamblin renewed her relationship with Beauvoir after the War and continued to have platonic meetings with her for the rest of Beauvoir's life. Lamblin's depiction of Beauvoir's life after Sartre's death is one of profound pathos and emotional disenfranchisement. By that point, Beauvoir's alcoholism was quite advanced and the reader senses that the great thinker and prolific writer's death must have been a lonely, troubled, and confusing end indeed.
The reader should be warned that there is a sort of craftlessness to Lamblin's writing. For me, this added to the sense of authenticity of what she was attempting to communicate. She often tells the reader what she is going to say--or why she is relating a particular incident--before launching into her account of an event. This tends to pull the reader up short. As off-putting as this might be, for me it further convinced me of the author's essential guilelessness and I ultimately judged this practice as awkward but not offensive. In addition, I suspect that Julie Plovnick's translation of the French original is a little wooden and literal-minded (for instance, she translates "lucide" as "lucid" in a context where I suspect "perceptive" might have been the intended meaning).
Readers interested in the way people, and especially women, make meaning of the troubles life throws their way will enjoy this book. Other books along this line that I have enjoyed are Girl Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen, The Liar's Club by Mary Karr, and A Loving Gentleman: The Love Story of William Faulkner and Meta Carpenter by Meta Carpenter Wilde and Orin Borsten.
Reddefender
I had not known that de Beauvoir seduced young girls and then passed them on to Sartre to exploit. This is an autobiography and details the author's recollections of their disgusting treatment of her as well as their refusal to help her escape the Nazis when they occupied France and hunted down the Jews. She managed to survive anyway. I read the book in one exciting sitting.
Risinal
Ever since I read last year the book, "A DANGEROUS LIAISON: A Revelatory New Biography of Simone De Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre," I have been both intrigued by and very critical of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir because of the way they tended to use or exploit some of their friends and lovers. Bianca Lamblin (nee Bienenfeld) is a case in point. She was a pupil of de Beauvoir (who was a philosophy professor at a lycée for adolescent girls in Paris) when she was in her teens in the late 1930s. Both Bianca and de Beauvoir eventually had a personal (and sexual) relationship. De Beauvoir and Sartre became mentors to Bianca, who was deeply impressed with them and deeply flattered by their interest in her. Bianca became fully aware of the special Sartre-de Beauvoir relationship and came to believe that, as the third person, they could form a strong, loving, and supportive tripartite relationship.

But as war clouds began to gather over Europe in 1939, de Beauvoir began to tire of Bianca and passed her on to Sartre in keeping with the dictates of their special relationship, in which they shared lovers and always told each other the truth.

Rather than be truthful about her desire to end her relationship with Bianca, de Beauvoir tried to make it appear that it was Sartre's decision to sever ties, not hers. Bianca, who confesses to her own naivety in the book, was at an utter loss. By this time, it was early 1940 and France was at war with Germany. Sartre, though recalled to the army, ended his relationship with Bianca by sending her --- after de Beauvoir's prompting --- a hastily written letter. Bianca, who admits to being in love with both Sartre and de Beauvoir, was deeply hurt by their abandonment of her and traumatized by the French defeat in June 1940.

The German Occupation put Bianca, a Jew, in grave danger. A danger which only intensified as the war went on and the Germans (with the aid of the French collaborationists) went about rounding up Jews in France and transporting them East to the concentration camps. Bianca and her family had to leave Paris for Southern France, where they were fortunate to survive the war.

This is a very compelling book and I cannot help but feel deeply sympathetic about Bianca Lamblin in light of her experiences with Sartre & de Beauvoir. I recommend it for anyone interested in memoirs and the interwar era in Europe.
Stonewing
Very good narrative of historical interest