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by Kang-i Sun Chang,Stephen Owen
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Kang-i Sun Chang,Stephen Owen
  • ISBN:
    0521855586
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521855587
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (February 28, 2010)
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
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The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature is a 2-volume history book series published by Cambridge University Press in 2013.

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature is a 2-volume history book series published by Cambridge University Press in 2013. Volume 1 deals with Chinese literature before the Ming dynasty, and Volume 2 from the Ming dynasty onward. ISBN 978-0-521-85558-7. ISBN 978-0-521-85559-4.

Collection: Cambridge Histories - Literature. Chaves, Jonathan, ed. and trans. The Columbia Book of Later Chinese Poetry. Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1985. Recommend to librarian. The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature. New York: Columbia University Press, 1986. Moral Action in the Poetry of Wu Chia-chi (Wu Jiaji, 1618–1684). Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 46, no. 2 (1986): 387–469.

She is the author of The Evolution of Chinese Tz’u Poetry (Princeton, 1980), Six Dynasties Poetry (Princeton, 1986), and The Late Ming Poet Ch’en Tzu-lung: Crises of Love and Loyalism (New Haven, 1991).

Chang, Kang-i Sun. The Evolution of Chinese Tz’u Poetry: From Late Tang to Northern Sung. Chinese Literature in Transitionfrom Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Variorum Collected Studies Series. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988. Chang, Kang-i Sun. Symbolic and Allegorical Meanings in the Yueh-fu pu-t’i Poem Series. HarvardJournal of Asiatic Studies 46, no. 2 (1986): 353–385. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1999. Aldershot, Brookfield, Singapore, and Sydney: Ashgate, 1998.

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature. These books were recognized early on as a landmark of literary history, charac-teristic of the urbanely amateur style so fashionable in Edwardian and Georgian times. 1 The one-volume abridgement and revision of them done by George Sampson in 1941 as The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature (itself revised and expanded since then by other hands) was an achievement of discriminating.

Kang-i Sun Chang, Stephen Owen.

These volumes treat not only poetry, drama, and fiction, but early works of history and the informal prose of later eras. Kang-i Sun Chang, Stephen Owen.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). The chapters, organized chronologically, treat not only poetry, drama, and fiction, but also works of history and the informal prose of later eras.

Kang-i Sun Chang, Stephen Owen

Kang-i Sun Chang, Stephen Owen. Volume 1: Introduction 1. Early Chinese literature: beginnings through Western Han Martin Kern 2. From the Eastern Han through the Western Jin (AD 25-317) David Knechtges 3. From the Eastern Jin through the Early Tang (317-649) Xiaofei Tian 4. The Cultural Tang (650-1020) Stephen Owen 5. The Northern Song (1020-1126) Ronald Egan 6. North and South: the twelfth and. thirteenth centuries Michael Fuller and Shuen-fu Lin 7. Literature from the Late Jin to the Early Ming: c. 230-ca. 1375 Stephen . ONTINUE READING.

Kang-i Sun Chang (born 1944), née Sun Kang-i (Chinese: 孫康宜; pinyin: Sūn Kāngyí), is a Chinese-American scholar of classical Chinese literature.

China has one of the longest continuous literary traditions in the world. Kang-i Sun Chang (born 1944), née Sun Kang-i (Chinese: 孫康宜; pinyin: Sūn Kāngyí), is a Chinese-American scholar of classical Chinese literature.

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature

cambridge university press Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, Sa˜o Paulo, Delhi, Dubai, Tokyo Cambridge University Press. repertoire of characters led to the promiscuous use of loan characters ( jiajiezi); that is, characters being borrowed to write a whole range of homophonous words.