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by Sam Newton
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Sam Newton
  • ISBN:
    0859913619
  • ISBN13:
    978-0859913614
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    D.S.Brewer (December 15, 1994)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1690 kb
  • ePUB format
    1674 kb
  • DJVU format
    1550 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    808
  • Formats:
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Anyone interested in the history of Vikings and Norsemen should read this book. It kept me reading long into the night.

Anyone interested in the history of Vikings and Norsemen should read this book. The action sequences were well written and it goes without saying that it should be read before veiwing the movie. If you enjoyed 'Eaters of the Dead' by Michael Crichton you will enjoy this.

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have been fostered in the kingdom of East Anglia. His argument, detailed and passionate, offers the exciting possibility that he has discovered the lost origins of the poem in the pre-Viking kingdom of 8th-century East Anglia.

He supports his thesis with evidence drawn from East Anglian archaeology, hagiography and folklore. SAM NEWTON was awarded his P.

East Anglia) Where did Beowulf, unique and thrilling example of an Old English epic poem, come from? Sam Newton - who lives within serious walking distance of Sutton Hoo considers the origins of Anglo-Saxon England's great epic poem to have been in East Anglia; h. .

East Anglia) Where did Beowulf, unique and thrilling example of an Old English epic poem, come from? Sam Newton - who lives within serious walking distance of Sutton Hoo considers the origins of Anglo-Saxon England's great epic poem to have been in East Anglia; he supports his thesis with and supports his thesis with evidence from East Anglian archaeology, hagiography and folklore, bringing life to a vanished age with his sympathetic interpretation of the few records that have survived.

The kingdom of East Anglia, (also known as the kingdom of the East . The Origins of Beowulf and the Pre-Viking Kingdom of East Anglia. Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer.

The kingdom of East Anglia, (also known as the kingdom of the East Angles), was a small independent Anglo-Saxon kingdom that comprised what are now the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk and perhaps the eastern part of the Fens. The kingdom was one of the seven traditional members of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy. a b Jones, Vikings, p. 421. ^ Bede, Ecclesiastical History, book II, chapter 15. ^ Hoggett, East Anglian Conversion, pp. 24–27.

Beowulf and the Beowulf Manuscript. The Origins of Beowulf: From Vergil to Wiglaf. The Origins of Beowulf: From Vergil to Wiglaf

The Viking invasions of the ninth century destroyed the monasteries in East Anglia where many documents relating to the rule of the . Newton, The Origins of Beowulf and the Pre-Viking Kingdom of East Anglia, p 133–134. Osbert Guy Stanhope Crawford (1948)

The Viking invasions of the ninth century destroyed the monasteries in East Anglia where many documents relating to the rule of the Wuffingas would have been kept. The last of the Wuffingas kings was Ælfwald, who died in 749 and who was succeeded by kings whose lineage is unknown. The following family tree includes the Wuffingas kings from Wehha to Ælfwald. Osbert Guy Stanhope Crawford (1948). Sutton Hoo and Beowulf" by Sune Lindqvist in Antiquity, Volume 42, Page 140. Antiquity Publications. Retrieved 30 November 2012.

Newton, S. The Origins of Beowulf and the Pre-Viking Kingdom of East Anglia, Cambridge: . Niiteme, . Jussi Saukkonen et a. ed. Old Friends – Strong Ties: Finland and the United States of America, Turku and Vaasa: Institute of Migration, 1976

Newton, S. Old Friends – Strong Ties: Finland and the United States of America, Turku and Vaasa: Institute of Migration, 1976. Norwich, J. Byzantium: The Apogee, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1993. O’Donoghue, H. Old Norse-Icelandic Literature: An Introduction, Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.

SIX East Anglia and the Making of Beowulf. SIX East Anglia and the Making of Beowulf.

`A thoroughly plausible scenario for the poet's interest in affairs long ago and far away; for the poem's odd contradictory-but-connected relationship with later Scandinavian story its chilling air of utter contextual security in whatever was its own.' TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT TOM SHIPPEY Where did Beowulf, unique and thrilling example of an Old English epic poem come from? In whose hall did the poem's maker first tell the tale? The poem exists now in just one manuscript, probably itself a copy, but a long and careful study of the literary and historical associations reveals striking details which lead Dr Newton to claim, as he pieces together the various clues, a specific origin for the poem. The fortunes of threeearly 6th-century Northern dynasties feature prominently in Beowulf. Dr Newton suggests that references in the poem to the heroes whose names are listed in Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies indicate that such Northern dynastic concerns are most likely to have been fostered in the kingdom of East Anglia. He supports his thesis with evidence drawn from East Anglian archaeology, hagiography and folklore. His argument, detailed and passionate, offers the exciting possibility that he has discovered the lost origins of the poem in the pre-Viking kingdom of 8th-century East Anglia.SAM NEWTON graduated with a first in English literature from the University of East Anglia, Norwich, where he was later awarded his Ph.D. for work on Beowulf. (East Anglia) Where did Beowulf, unique and thrilling example of an Old English epic poem, come from? Sam Newton - who lives within serious walking distance of Sutton Hoo considers the origins of Anglo-Saxon England's great epic poem to have been in East Anglia; he supports his thesis with and supports his thesis with evidence from East Anglian archaeology, hagiography and folklore, bringing life to a vanished age with his sympathetic interpretation of the few records that have survived.

Chinon
I wish I had read this in high school or college. Sam Newton may or may not be right, we will never know, but he is very credible when he suggests that Beowulf accurately describes the comings and goings of one group of late Migration Age or early Vendel Age Geats through and across the Danish islands of Fyn and Zealand. Newton's take on Beowulf should interest anyone who is also interested in what a contemporary account of one event in the Migration Age might have looked like.

One has no trouble imagining that the description of Beowulf and his Geats in Beowulf is pretty much what had been going for the better part of the millennium before about 500 CE. In Beowulf they returned to Götland, but the conclusion is inescapable that at other times similar groups likely left southern Sweden bound for Zealand and then went east and became Goths, or any one of the other east Germanic tribes; or went west and became Jutes,Frisians and Danes; or went south and became Saxons, Franks or any one of the other west Germanic tribes. It also lends support to impression that in the late Iron Age, the terms "Denmark" and "Danes" likely described all of the land and all of the people in southern Sweden, Norway, Jutland and the islands of Fyn and Zealand (Sjelland). If you read this, keep in mind that distance across the Oresund between southwest Sweden and Zealand in Denmark is less than two miles at Heslinger (Elsinore)-Helsingborg and about 5 miles between Malmo and Copenhagen. It has been demonstrated that the locals had been able to build paddle powered boats capable of making this journey, and big enough to carry a war-party of at least 20, since at least the middle of the Iron Age.

The Sutton Hoo burial does suggest that the same kind of people were living in East Anglia, Denmark, southern Norway and Sweden, south of Norrköping, in the Vendel era.
Alsath
This book is easily one of the best monographs written about Beowulf in recent decades. It is a work of serious and sober scholarship, infused with just the right amount of imagination to breathe life into the fragmentary evidence. Of all attempts to date and localize the composition of Beowulf, this is perhaps the most persuasive yet offered. Newton's learning is impressive. The reader will invariably learn much about many things, since Newton incorporates a remarkably wide range of evidence into his study. Highly recommended.
Nikojas
Anyone interested in the history of Vikings and Norsemen should read this book.It kept me reading long into the night.The action sequences were well written and it goes without saying that it should be read before veiwing the movie.If you enjoyed 'Eaters of the Dead' by Michael Crichton you will enjoy this.