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by Anthony Pearsall,Linda Joyce Franks
Download The Lovecraft Lexicon: A Reader's Guide to Persons, Places and Things in the Tales of H.P. Lovecraft fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Anthony Pearsall,Linda Joyce Franks
  • ISBN:
    1561841293
  • ISBN13:
    978-1561841295
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    New Falcon Publications; 2nd edition (June 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    598 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1207 kb
  • ePUB format
    1887 kb
  • DJVU format
    1966 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    808
  • Formats:
    doc lrf azw lrf


The Lovecraft Lexicon is his first book. Chronology of Selected Tales. The Lovecraft Lexicon. By Anthony B. Pearsall. Tempe, AZ: New Falcon Publications; 2005; ISBN 1-56184-129-3 (softcover); 472 pages.

The Lovecraft Lexicon is his first book. Abbreviations of Selected Tales Referenced in the Lexicon. B-67 – Butler Street Station. de) C Family – Czanek, Mary. Purchasing This Book. com or Barnes & Noble or directly from the publisher, New Falcon Publications. Return to Literary Criticism. Page Last Revised 24 June 2005.

Armed with The Lovecraft Lexicon, you have the definitive guide to the people, places and things which influenced his life and . This book seems to cover everything that plays a part in the classic tales of .

Armed with The Lovecraft Lexicon, you have the definitive guide to the people, places and things which influenced his life and his writings. And if that isn't enough, a special, extended Appendix details one of Lovecraft's recurrent themes: Caves, Caverns and Abysses. With so many forbidden books mentioned in his stories the reader needs a guide to sort out which are his and which are the creation of his fellow authors. The "Lexicon" even lists the origins of some of the names and places for the benefit of readers unfamiliar with various myths and legends.

The Lovecraft Lexicon book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Lovecraft Lexicon: A Reader's Guide to Persons, Places and Things in the Tales of . Lovecraft as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Anthony Pearsall has done just that

Anthony Pearsall has done just that. From "Abbadon" (a demon in The Nameless City) to "Zuro" (a river in The Quest of Iranon), Pearsall has meticulously covered hundreds of the People, Places and In-The-Night in Lovecrafts writings. The Lexicon also includes quite a bit about Lovecraft himself, as well as many of the People, Places and Things which influenced his life and his writings. And if that werent enough, a special Appendix highlites one of Lovecrafts recurrent themes: "Caves, Caverns, Wells & Abysses". A "must have" for all fans of Lovecrafts work. Издания произведения: ISBN

THE LOVECRAFT LEXICON: A Readers Guide to Persons, Places and Things in the Tales of H. P. Lovecraft - by Anthony Pearsall Although he died in 1937, Howard .

com: The Lovecraft Lexicon: A Reader's Guide to Persons, Places and Things in the Tales of . Armed with The Lovecraft Lexicon, you have the definitive guide to the people, places and things which influenced his life and his writings.

The Lovecraft Lexicon: A Reader's Guide to Persons, Places and Things in the Tales of . Lovecraft By Anthony Brainard Pearsall. For decades, . Lovecraft's horror stories--such as The Dunwich Horror and The Call of Cthulhu--have intrigued and horrified readers from all over the world. But Lovecraft's world is filled with a daunting array of bizarre and obscure characters, monsters, places and "things" which can be quite a task for anyone to sort out. Anthony Pearsall has done just that

P The Lovecraft Lexicon: A Reader's Guide to Persons, Places, and Things in the Tales of .

Lovecraft enjoyed a limited readership during his lifetime but his impact has been enormous. Most noted for being the creator of the Cthulhu Mythos and the Necronomicon, which have become hallmarks of the fantasy and horror genres, his influence has spilled over to the great cultural consciousness. This work was to be Lovecraft's first published book, and was printed in 1928 by Recluse Press. The Lovecraft Lexicon: A Reader's Guide to Persons, Places, and Things in the Tales of . Lovecraft Anthony Brainard Pearsall.

Armed with The Lovecraft Lexicon, you have the definitive guide to the people, places & things which influenced his life & his writings. And if that isn't enough, a special, extended Appendix details one of Lovecraft's recurrent themes: Caves, Caverns & Abysses

Armed with The Lovecraft Lexicon, you have the definitive guide to the people, places & things which influenced his life & his writings. And if that isn't enough, a special, extended Appendix details one of Lovecraft's recurrent themes: Caves, Caverns & Abysses.

The thing, it was averred, was biologically impossible to start with; merely another of those crazy country .

The thing, it was averred, was biologically impossible to start with; merely another of those crazy country mutterings which Cotton Mather had been gullible enough to dump into his chaotic Magnalia Christi Americana, and so poorly authenticated that even he had not ventured to name the locality where the horror occurred. It is all in that ancestral diary I found; all the hushed innuendoes and furtive tales of things with a blemished eye seen at windows in the night or in deserted meadows near the woods.

Though Howard Phillips (H.P.) Lovecraft died in 1937, his remarkable body of work, including The Dunwich Horror and The Call of Cthulhu, continue to intrigue and horrify readers from all over the world. Its elements of horror, fantasy, and magic have captured an enormous and varied audience. But Lovecraft's world of imagination can be highly complex. It is filled with a daunting array of bizarre and obscure characters, monsters, places and things which can be quite a task for anyone to sort out. Anthony Pearsall has done just that. From Abbadon (a demon in the Nameless City) to Zuro (a river in The Quest of Iranon), Pearsall has meticulously covered hundreds of the People, Places and Things in H.P. Lovecraft's writings. Armed with The Lovecraft Lexicon, you have the definitive guide to the people, places and things which influenced his life and his writings. And if that isn't enough, a special, extended Appendix details one of Lovecraft's recurrent themes: Caves, Caverns and Abysses.

Amhirishes
If you are a writer of Lovecraftian weird fiction, this is an extremely handy tool as well as a source of rich delight. Anthony Pearsall comes from a family of University professors, and his approach with this wonderful book is educated, informed and vastly entertaining. His Introduction is excellent in introducing the reader to the world of H. P. Lovecraft and shews Pearsall well-acquainted with HPL's biography and era. We find no tiresome myths or harsh judgments, only facts and incidents, with choice passages from Lovecraft's Letters and reminiscences from those who knew Lovecraft. Entries reference Lovecraft's many inventions of characters, daemons, mythic cities, &c. Some entries are concise, such as this for the entry on "Aklo Language":

"An ancient, secret writing-system in which certain powerful spells have been recorded. Robert Blake, in 'The Haunter of the Dark,' used Aklo to translate a mysterious book that he found in the deserted Starry Wisdom church on Federal Hill, Providence. In 'The Dunwich Horror,' Wilbur Whateley learned Aklo to perform a 'Sabaoth' ceremony. HPL borrowed the Aklo language concept from Arthur Machen's moody horror story 'The White People,' which he considered to be the 'second-best' weird tale of their time. In Machen's tale a little English girl being trained in the occult writes in her diary:

'I must not write down the real names of the days and months which I found out a year ago, nor the way to make the Aklo Letters, or the Chian language, or the great beautiful Circles, nor the Mao Games, nor the chief songs.'"

Others entries, such as those on "Nyarlathotep," "Dunwich," "Old Ones," and "Providence" are of substantial length.

In "A Note On Sources," Mr. Pearsall writes: "The serious study of Howard Phillips Lovecraft now and forever must necessarily begin with H. P. LOVECRAFT: A LIFE (West Warrick, R. I., 1996) by Mr. S. T. Joshi, A.B., A.M. of Brown University. This brilliant book of some 650 tightly-written, densely-footnoted pages deserves some sort of monument for comprehensiveness in a one-volume literary biography, and might qualify as the greatest work of its kind that any minor literary figure has even been posthumously blessed with. I am indebted to it for many, many facts and critical insights, presented in an incisive and masterly style. Mr. Joshi is without a doubt the world's foremost expert on Lovecraft's life and works, and his total command of the subject stands revealed on every page." Spot on.

The book ends, delightfully, with the Appendix: "Caves, Caverns, Wells & Abysses," which should provide much delight for all fans of Lovecraft and writers who follow in his fictive footsteps. Indeed, the clever and astute Lovecraftian author will find much in this entertaining Appendix to inspire their own perverse work.
Stylish Monkey
A couple of times when I was younger I tried to compile a lexicon like this. It was just so fascinating seeing all the references and connections that Lovecraft put into his work. That was before personal computers; the pencil and paper task was too much for my undisciplined self. And now (well, 2005) Antony Pearsall did it and completed it. Kudos to him.
I am very well pleased with this; I've been reading it cover to cover and have got as far as "Witch House". I think Pearsall gives a fine explanation in each entry, including clarifying points about America in early 20th century that contemporary readers might not know - explaining what a "party line" was, for instance.
I personally only noticed one error (I wouldn't have caught the Catullus error) - Pearsall seems to have thought that Joseph Curwen, after murdering Charles Dexter Ward, recreated and took over Ward's body. This is repeated at several places, so it wasn't just a slip of writing at one point. He probably got a few letters when the book came out correcting him on that point.
I'd give it 4.9 out of 5 - rounding off to 5 stars - but only for Lovecraft fans, of course. A non-Lovecraft fan probably wouldn't care for this at all.
P.S. The other thing I tried to do was correlate the dates in Lovecraft's stories. That has also been done, in The Chronology Out of Time, a 33 page pamphlet by Peter Cannon.
superstar
This book seems to cover everything that plays a part in the classic tales of H.P. Lovecraft. With so many forbidden books mentioned in his stories the reader needs a guide to sort out which are his and which are the creation of his fellow authors. The "Lexicon" even lists the origins of some of the names and places for the benefit of readers unfamiliar with various myths and legends. The only thing that keeps it from being a five star book is the overlong biography, better to give just a one or two page outline and a list of further reading. One other fault is the author's putting in his personal opinion about some story elements instead of letting the reader interpret them as they see fit. The faults are picky when compared to the book as a whole, which is far superior to the "Encyclopedia Cthuliana", which only covered a portion of his writings. "The Lovecraft Lexicon" is a must for any true fan of HPL.
lifestyle
I found this book to be very good but don't understand why they chose not to include ALL of his tales. They used only 80% of his stories, leaving out:

-Azathoth
-Ex Oblivione
-Memory
-Nyarlathotep
-Old Bugs
-Sweet Ermengarde
-The Book
-The Descendant
-The Very Old Folk
-What the Moon Brings

Granted three of those are only fragmentary, but I still believe they should have all been included for the sake of completeness. Even if they only used the other 7 it still would had made this book that little bit better.
Diab
I only recently began reading Lovecraft's Mythos stories and this book is a welcome aid. It helps me make sense of all the different characters and get a better feel for the atmosphere of the mythos stories. The book is well written and quite thorough in its coverage of Lovecraft's characters and background for the Cthulhu Mythos. It's a fun read and well worth having, if you are a HP Lovecraft fan.
Cia
The Lovecraft Lexicon was a perfect companion to my Encyclopedia Cthulhiana. While one covers the monsters, the Lexicon goes deeper into the locales and language that Lovecraft created to populate his weird mythos. Every HPL fan needs this on their shelf.
Shou
This book is a must for all H.P. Lovecraft fans. A quick and easy referrence guide to all things Lovecraft.