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by Neil MacGregor
Download Shakespeare's Restless World fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Neil MacGregor
  • ISBN:
    144584690X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1445846903
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    BBC Books; Unabridged edition (June 21, 2012)
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1707 kb
  • ePUB format
    1332 kb
  • DJVU format
    1272 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    806
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Shakespeare's Restless World. Neil MacGregor introduces Shakespeare's Restless World. Exploring the world of William Shakespeare through a selection of objects from his time.

Shakespeare's Restless World. Fretwork perform music from Shakespeare's Restless World. The Consort of Viols, Fretwork, perform music specially recorded for the programme.

What was their world? The main theatres of Shakespeare’s London.

Title: Shakespeare's Restless World Item Condition: used item in a very good condition. Books will be free of page markings. Показать все 4 объявления с подержанными товарами. Продавец:awesomebooksusa (296153)98,8% положительных отзывовСвязаться с продавцом. British Museum Director Neil MacGregor repearts the format used in his "History of the World in 100 Objects" by taking 20 diverse objects which reflect the era in which Shakespearte lived

Shakespeare's Restless World. British Museum Director Neil MacGregor repearts the format used in his "History of the World in 100 Objects" by taking 20 diverse objects which reflect the era in which Shakespearte lived. As with his previous series, his presentation is rather dry and academic. External metadata update. The New York Times bestselling author of A History of the World in 100 Objects brings the world of Shakespeare and the Tudor era of Elizabeth I into focus. We feel we know Shakespeare's characters. Think of Hamlet, trapped in indecision, or Macbeth's merciless and ultimately self-destructive ambition, or the Machiavellian rise and short reign of Richard III. They are so vital, so alive and real that we can see aspects of ourselves in them. But their world was at once familiar and nothing like our own.

Praise for Shakespeare’s Restless World

Praise for Shakespeare’s Restless World. What did Elizabethan theatergoers eat while watching Hamlet? British Museum Director MacGregor answers that question and many others as he examines 20 objects, now in museums and libraries, that illuminate daily life in Shakespearean England. Visually splendid, intellectually stimulating.

Shakespeare's Restless World book. Neil MacGregor is a world-renowned museum director who transformed the British Museum since he took charge in 2002

Shakespeare's Restless World book. Neil MacGregor is a world-renowned museum director who transformed the British Museum since he took charge in 2002. He is the author of "A History of the World in 100 Objects" a New York Times bestseller.

The book, Shakespeare's Restless World, illustrates the botched attempts to overlay or juxtapose the crosses of St Andrew and St George. As MacGregor writes, "you can see the intractable politics of union being played out in graphic form"

The book, Shakespeare's Restless World, illustrates the botched attempts to overlay or juxtapose the crosses of St Andrew and St George. As MacGregor writes, "you can see the intractable politics of union being played out in graphic form". The "one nation" beloved of so many politicians has always been easier to invoke than to achieve, or even to depict. Download the new Indpendent Premium app.

It's such a beautiful book recreating Shakespeare's world through examining twenty objects.

What was life like for Shakespeare's first audiences? In a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, how did Elizabethan play-goers make sense of their changing world? What did the plays mean to the public when they were first performed? In this fascinating series, Neil MacGregor attempts to answer these questions by examining 20 objects from that turbulent period. There are grand objects such as a communion chalice, a Venetian goblet, and Dr. Dee's mirror, as well as everyday items such as a theater-goer's fork and an apprentice's cap. From Drake's circumnavigation medal to an eye relic, he uses these objects to explore the issues that shaped Shakespeare's plays, and considers what they reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England. Speaking to scholars, historians, and experts, he discusses the topics raised—everything from exploration and discovery to violence, entertainment, and the plague.

4 CDs. 4 hrs 32 mins.


Inertedub
When you go to a museum and you look an old object, you can read a brief label about it. But in an ideal museum you would be able to read an entire essay about how an object was used and what it meant in the context of the culture of its time.

You cannot do this in a museum, because you cannot read an essay while standing in front of a glass case. But the author of this book, Neil MacGregor, lets you know what it would be like if museums had armchairs. In a previous volume, "A History of the World in 100 Objects", he takes an object, say, a Korean roof tile 1,300 years old, and explains how a person of that period would have regarded it, what it meant in the context of its time.

He has done the same thing in "Shakespeare's World" with 20 objects from Shakespeare's time. An example is a silver medallion about 2½ inches in diameter, made in commemoration of Drake's circumnavigation of the earth in 1577-80, when Shakespeare was a teenager. In order to truly under this object, you have to know that Shakespeare lived when Europeans first began to understand the world in an entirely new way, a great round globe (one of his theaters was named "The Globe"), full of brave new worlds with strange and wondrous people in them. His plays are full of references to maps (Comedy of Errors), strange lands (The Tempest) and exotic foreigners (Othello, Shylock). To have lived in Shakespeare's time was to have begun to see the world in an entirely new way, just like for us the world changed when we saw images of the earth taken from space.

Another object is a communion cup. In order to understand this object you have to know that everyone was forced to drink from such cups in church and everyone had, by law, to go the church. It helps to know this when Claudius orders Hamlet to drink from a goblet, and when Gertrude refuses to obey him when he tells her not to.

Another object is a fork, an elegant and rare object lost by some rich person in the audience while watching a play. This signifies luxury, which is associated with Italy. This chapter contains information on Elizabethan foods, and explains what Falstaff's meal would have meant to the audience: "potatoes", rare and exotic, "kissing comfits", breath mints in a land of primitive dentistry, and "sea holly", an aphrodisiac.

The book helped me to better understand Shakespeare's world and his plays. I kept wondering, however, how the author had time to both run the British Museum, and also write such fascinating books.
Tojahn
This amazing history puts Shakespeare and his plays into the context of the life and times of the Elizabethan and Jacobean age. By taking simple objects, MacGregor expands the story of the object into its meaning and posistion in the lifestyle of the people. It also puts some of the quotes and references in Shakespeare's plays into context, making them so much more understandable and relevant.
Moralsa
I ordered this book because I enjoyed the BBC's eponymous podcast series. This book is pretty much a word-for-word transcription of the series, but its lovely design and lavish illustrations make it worth the splurge. If you liked the podcast series, you'll treasure this book.
Barit
Dr Macgregor has a unique way of teaching history. Looking at the late 16th/early 17th century in England through the eyes of Shakespeare gives us a novel way of seeing both the social and poltical aspects of the time, but also throws new (to me!) light on the great plays too. Like, who knows why there are so many sword duels in the plays? Or what happened to the theatre when the plague hit London?
I loved this book - an easy and delightful read.
Agalen
Fascinating look at a gone world through objects. It opens up a window on Shakespeare's life and environment. Memorable.
Gavirim
good
Modred
As a lover of Shakespeare and someone fascinated by the "trivia" of history, this was the required book. MacGregor takes 20 unrelated objects and weaves a tale that opens a window on Shakespeare and his times. This is a fine addition to Shakespeare' world. The pictures are wonderful!
Interesting factual data of everyday articles in the works of Shakespeare. Gave a good picture of common day life in the working class of England during the time of Shakespeare.