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by A. D. Nuttall
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    A. D. Nuttall
  • ISBN:
    0198187661
  • ISBN13:
    978-0198187660
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (May 24, 2001)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1196 kb
  • ePUB format
    1621 kb
  • DJVU format
    1625 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    231
  • Formats:
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Why Does Tragedy Give Pl. .has been added to your Cart. This delightful little book not only attracts the reader with its enigmatic title, it ensnares her into following its argument like a detective story, whose solution is not disclosed before its final pages.

Why Does Tragedy Give Pl. A. D. Nuttall is Professor of English and Fellow of New College, Oxford.

Start by marking Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure ? as Want to Read . Or because tragedy actually reaches out to the dark side of human nature? Nuttall's wide-ranging, lively, and engaging book offers a new answer to this perennial question.

Start by marking Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure ? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Writers discussed include Aristotle, Shakespeare, Nietzsche, and Freud.

Why do people who are neither wicked nor depraved enjoy watching plays about suffering or death? . Nuttall's wide-ranging, lively and engaging book offers a new answer to this perennial question.

Why do people who are neither wicked nor depraved enjoy watching plays about suffering or death? Is it because we see horrific matter controlled by majestic art? Or because tragedy actually reaches out to the dark side of human nature? A. Nuttall's wide-ranging, lively and engaging book offers a new answer to this perennial question

Why does tragedy give pleasure? Why do people who are neither wicked nor depraved enjoy watching plays about suffering or death? Is it because we see horrific matter controlled by majestic art?

Why does tragedy give pleasure? Why do people who are neither wicked nor depraved enjoy watching plays about suffering or death? Is it because we see horrific matter controlled by majestic art? Or because tragedy actually reaches out to the dark side of human nature? A.

D. Nuttall, Date: July 23, 2018,Views: 47. Author:A. 3. The game of death. My last chapter ended with Freud and with the question, & the admission of a dark side of the mind-an unconscious-have a bearing on the problem of the pleasure of tragedy?' Behind this darkening of the mind, however, there lies another darkening, of our picture of the ancient sources of European literature. Antiquity, formerly given over to the Ego, becomes itself the province of the Id.

Nuttall first taught at Sussex University where he was successively lecturer, reader and professor of.Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure?.

Nuttall first taught at Sussex University where he was successively lecturer, reader and professor of English and where his students included the philosopher A. C. Grayling and the critic and biographer Robert Fraser. After a tumultuous period as pro-vice chancellor at Sussex, he moved on to New College, Oxford, in 1984, eventually being elected to an Oxford chair. To him he dedicated his book The Alternative Trinity, a study of the Gnostic tradition in English literature through Marlowe and Milton to William Blake, a poet to whom both brothers had been attracted in their youth, if in rather different ways.

oceedings{Halliwell1998ADN, title {A. Nuttall: Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure?

oceedings{Halliwell1998ADN, title {A. Nuttall: Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure? Pp. x + 110. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Why does tragedy 'give pleasure' to people like ourselves?" A C Bradley. His humour intends to give pain or allows him to bask in his sense of his own superiority". Exceptional suffering and calamity". He enjoys a godlike sense of power".

In his book, Why does tragedy give us pleasure?, the critic . Nuttall nicely summarized this view: The human race has found a way, if not to abolish, then to defer and diminish the Darwinian treadmill of death. We send our hypotheses ahead, an expendable army, and watch them fall.

Why does tragedy give pleasure? Why do people who are neither wicked nor depraved enjoy watching plays about suffering and death? Is it because we see horrific matter controlled by majestic art? Or because tragedy actually reaches out to the dark side of human nature? Nuttall's wide-ranging, lively, and engaging book offers a new answer to this perennial question. Writers discussed include Aristotle, Shakespeare, Nietzsche, and Freud.