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by Zvi Kolitz
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Zvi Kolitz
  • ISBN:
    0375708405
  • ISBN13:
    978-0375708404
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage; First Vintage Intern edition (October 10, 2000)
  • Pages:
    114 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1576 kb
  • ePUB format
    1907 kb
  • DJVU format
    1412 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    822
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf doc txt


Start by marking Yosl Rakover Talks to God as Want to Read . The parallel story is that of Zvi Kolitz, the true author, whose connection to Yosl Rakover has been obscured over the fifty years since its original appearance

Start by marking Yosl Rakover Talks to God as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The parallel story is that of Zvi Kolitz, the true author, whose connection to Yosl Rakover has been obscured over the fifty years since its original appearance. German journalist Paul Badde tells how a young man came to write this classic response to evil, and then was nearly written out of its history.

Kolitz, Zvi, 1913-; Janeway, Carol Brown; Badde, Paul, 1948-; Lévinas, Emmanuel; Wieseltier, Leon. Kolitz, Zvi, 1913-, Jewish journalists, Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), World War, 1939-1945, Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945). London : Jonathan Cape. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. org on October 20, 2010.

Zvi Kolitz was born in Lithuania, the son of a great rabbi. He currently lives in New York City, where he has worked as a filmmaker, a theatrical producer on Broadway, and a lecturer at Yeshiva University.

Already an acclaimed bestseller in Europe, Yosl Rakover Talks to God restores a blazing artifact of. .Zvi Kolitz was born in Lithuania, the son of a great rabbi

Already an acclaimed bestseller in Europe, Yosl Rakover Talks to God restores a blazing artifact of twentieth-century writing to its true setting. Zvi Kolitz was born in Lithuania, the son of a great rabbi.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. A dying Jew's last words to God - a text that is regarded as the greatest piece of writing to have emerged from the Holocaust - the story of how it came to be written, and the afterlife of both the author. A dying Jew's last words to God - a text that is regarded as the greatest piece of writing to have emerged from the Holocaust - the story of how it came to be written, and the afterlife of both the author and his creation

A thought provoking read. This book will appeal if you are interested in the nature of God and religious belief, particularly in relation to Judaism and the Holocaust.

A thought provoking read. Find similar books Profile. God has hidden his face from the world and delivered mankind to its own savage urges and instincts. This is why I believe that when the forces of evil dominate the world, it is, alas completely natural that the first victims will be those who represent the holy and the pure.

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I, Yosl, son of David Rakover of Tarnopol, a follower of the Rabbi of Ger and descendant of the righteous, learned, and holy ones of the families . I cannot say, after all I have lived through, that my relation to God is unchanged

I, Yosl, son of David Rakover of Tarnopol, a follower of the Rabbi of Ger and descendant of the righteous, learned, and holy ones of the families Rakover and Maysels, am writing these lines as the houses of the Warsaw Ghetto are in flames, and the house I am in is one of the last that has not yet caught fire. I cannot say, after all I have lived through, that my relation to God is unchanged. But with absolute certainty I can say that my faith in Him has not altered by a hairsbreadth. In earlier times, when my life was good, my relation to Him was as if to one who gave me gifts without end, and to whom I was therefore always somewhat in debt.

The parallel story is that of Zvi Kolitz, the true author, whose connection to Yosl Rakover has been obscured over .

The parallel story is that of Zvi Kolitz, the true author, whose connection to Yosl Rakover has been obscured over the fifty years since its original appearance. German journalist Paul Badde tells how a young man came to write this classic response to evil and then was nearly written out of its history. What struck me almost immediately -and most noticeably- upon starting Yosl Rakover Talks to God was the unnerving honesty behind each sentence.

The short story "Yosl Rakover Talks to God" is a curious piece of literature that has taken on a life of its own as.Zvi Kolitz' story is almost as great as Yosl Rakover's monologue.

The short story "Yosl Rakover Talks to God" is a curious piece of literature that has taken on a life of its own as stated frequently by Paul Badde. This is not because of the writing - the story is not exquisitely written. It is not because of the theology - there are inconsistencies. Isaac Bashevis Singer, before he died, called the fictional tale about a participant in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising a "story of a Jew possessed by his faith as if by a Dybbuk. It similarly came to the attention of George Steiner and the theologian Klaus Beger. One can read the story in less than an hour.

There are two stories here. One is the now legendary tale of a defiant Jew's refusal to abandon God, even in the face of the greatest suffering the world has known, a testament of faith that has taken on an unpredictable and fascinating life of its own and has often been thought to be a direct testament from the Holocaust.The parallel story is that of Zvi Kolitz, the true author, whose connection to Yosl Rakover has been obscured over the fifty years since its original appearance. German journalist Paul Badde tells how a young man came to write this classic response to evil, and then was nearly written out of its history. With brief commentaries by French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas and Leon Wieseltier, author of Kaddish, this edition presents a religious classic and the very human story behind it.

Marige
In 1946, a Lithuanian Jew named Zvi Kolitz found his way to Buenos Aires, Argenitna, where he published the short story "Yosl Rakover Talks to God" in a Yiddish newspaper. Kolitz had escaped Europe just before the prosperous Jewish community there was destroyed by the one-two punch of Stalin and Hitler. He spent only a few years in South America before emigrating to Israel, where he became a film director, and eventually ending up in New York, where he died in 2002 at the age of 89. This book is both the story he wrote and the story of his life--all told in less than 100 pages.

The book actually contains four distinct parts. The first is a relatively new translation of "Yosl Rakover Talks to God" by Carol Brown Janeway. This is a story that has had a strange life of its own, completely independent of the life of its author. Ir filtered into Europe and Israel, appearing in several anthologies of Holocaust Literature as a true story--a letter really written to God by a Jew who was resisting the Nazi's in the last days of the Warsaw ghetto (even though its original publication made no such claim). The story itself creates this fiction and uses it to ask the really difficult questions about believing in God in a world of suffering that people have been asking for thousands of years, but especially after the Holocaust. Rakover's attitude towards God is an almost perfect combination of faith and anger. In one passage, for example, he says

I believe in the God of Israel, even when He has done everything to make me cease to believe in Him. I believe in His laws even when I cannot justify His deeds. My relationship to Him is no longer that of a servant to his master, but of a student to his rabbi. I bow my head before His greatness, but I will not kiss the rod with which He chastises me.

Rakover comes to the conclusion that he must still approach God, but that he can approach Him, not simply as a debtor, but also as a creditor. That he has earned the right to chastise God and expect things from him. That God has a debt to pay to him, and, by extension, to all of the Jewish people. It is a very engaging sort of prayer.

The second and longest part of the book is a biographical essay by Paul Badde. Badde tells of his own stint as a literary detective, tracking down the original version of "Yosl Rakover Talks to God" and then discovering that Kolitz was still alive and living in New York. Through interviews and correspondence with the author at the end of his life, Badde is able to piece together the whole story of the manuscript for the first time in history, giving an excellent context to the fairly short story.

The third part of the book is a brief article on "Yosl Rakover Talks to God" first published in 1963 by the Lithuanian Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. Levinas is working without any knowledge whatsoever of the author or even any general consensus about whether or not it was a real leter or a fictional story (Levinas calls it a clear fiction, which turned out to be the right answer). In this brief, but dazzling essay, Levinas uses Yosl Rakover as an example of a mature faith in God--one capable of dealing with the horrible things that happen in the world because it is not based on illusions to begin with.

The fourth and final section of this book is a more traditional afterward by Leon Wieseltier, a journalist and critic, who responds to Levinas and gives his own readings of the story.

The book, as a book, feels a bit thin and haphazard, but all of the pieces are wonderful, and its core--"Yosl Rakoveor Talks to God"--is the most powerful statement of belief in a time of profound suffering that I have ever read.
Fiarynara
An amazingly powerful read, Zvi Kolitz wrote the "letter" this book discusses following the Second World War from the point of view of a Jew about to die in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. Powerful in his writing, for many years, there was a debate as to whether Kolitz's work was one of fiction. The letter itself, written by "Yosl Rakover", a resistance fighter and modern day Job, chronicles the challenges of faith and belief in an environment where God has "hidden his face".

The remainder of the book is a history of the writing itself, the discussion of a meeting with the author, and a couple of commentaries. These are OK - and interesting in their own right, but the best part about the book is the original letter itself. If you have never read it, please do so. It is a moving testimony to the resilience of faith.
Flathan
Everyone who remembers WW2 needs to read this.
Rayli
Reading this book should be compulsory in all schools of the West.
This book raises the spiritual light that Western civilization has lost and forgotten.
It 's a book that children can read and that feeds the soul of all men and women of good will.
Reading this book is the best thing you can do in your entire intellectual life.
Daron
I must say, this book was a disappointment to me. I kind of feel like the kid who said, "But the emperor isn't wearing any clothes!", while everyone else is raving about the beauty of his clothing. I had relatives who were killed during the holocaust, but still... I really loved the movie 'Europa, Europa' and I loved 'Man's Search for Meaning', but this book didn't hold a candle to them - IMHO.
zmejka
In 1946, Zvi Kolitz, who was a journalist and an ardent Zionist, wrote a short work of fiction in Yiddish. It was called "Yosl Rakover Talks to God." Kolitz put himself in the shoes of a man who was about to meet his death in the conflagration of the Warsaw Ghetto. Before he dies, Yosl confronts God and pours out his anguish and his testament of faith.

Over the years, this short manuscript passed through many hands, and a myth grew up around it. Many people insisted that it was an authentic document written by someone who really lived in the Warsaw Ghetto. Zvi Kolitz was disassociated from the work that he had written. The story itself is touching and meaningful. Yosl says that no matter what hardships and pain God sends his way, he is proud to be a Jew, and his belief in God is unwavering.

He thinks that, for some reason, God has decided to turn his face away from his people. Therefore, the Nazis and their cohorts had few obstacles to overcome in their mission to rid Europe of its Jewish population. Yosl takes the liberty of chastising God for putting the Jewish people through so much suffering. Following the story is an illuminating essay by Paul Badde, explaining the many twists and turns that this manuscript took since its original publication, and he provides insights into the life and philosophy of Zvi Kolitz. Although very brief, this volume is poignant and thought-provoking.