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by Scott Durham
Download Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Scott Durham
  • ISBN:
    0804733368
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804733366
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stanford University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    270 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1288 kb
  • ePUB format
    1255 kb
  • DJVU format
    1100 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    211
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Phantom Communities reconsiders the status of the simulacrum―sometimes defined as. .

Phantom Communities reconsiders the status of the simulacrum―sometimes defined as a copy of a copy. Phantom Communities develops its arguments with a razor's edge, and it has the gift of embracing ambivalence, contradiction, undecidability, and other forces with an uncommon sense of affirmation. This book will mark an enduring contribution to French studies in America. Tom Conley,Harvard University. From the Inside Flap.

Phantom Communities book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Phantom Communities book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Pedagogies and Learning in Cooperative and Symbolic Communities of Practice: Implications for and from the Education of Australian Show People.

Publications citing this paper. Showing 1-9 of 9 citations. Speech and utopia : spaces of poetic work in the writings of Segalen, Daumal and Bonnefoy. Pedagogies and Learning in Cooperative and Symbolic Communities of Practice: Implications for and from the Education of Australian Show People. Beverley Moriarty, Patrick Alan Danaher, Geoff Danaher. The Allen Institute for AIProudly built by AI2 with the help of our. Collaborators.

Similar books and articles. Universal Abandon: The Politics of Postmodernism. The Postmodern Presence Readings on Postmodernism in American Culture and Society. Andrew Ross (e. - 1989 - Univ of Minnesota Press. Our Shadowed Present: Modernism, Postmodernism, and History. J. C. D. Clark - 2003 - Stanford University Press. Postmodernism and the Re-Reading of Modernity. Francis Barker, Peter Hulme & Margaret Iversen - 1992. The Idea of the Postmodern: A History. Johannes Willem Bertens - 1995 - Routledge. The Cambridge Companion to Postmodernism. Arthur Asa Berger - 1998. Postmodernism a Christian Appraisal.

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Phantom Communities reconsiders the status of the defined as a copy of a copy, but more rigorously . Scott Durham is Assistant Professor of French at Northwestern University.

Phantom Communities reconsiders the status of the defined as a copy of a copy, but more rigorously defined as a copy that subverts the legitimacy and authority of its model-in light of recent debates in literature, art, philosophy, and cultural studies.

Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism

Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism. Phantom Communities reconsiders the status of the simulacrumâ?”sometimes defined as a copy of a copy, but more rigorously defined as a copy that subverts the legitimacy and authority of its modelâ?”in light of recent debates in literature, art, philosophy, and cultural studies. In so doing, Phantom Communities intervenes in ongoing interdisciplinary debates concerning the historical and ideological limits of postmodernism, as well as the utopian possibilities of art, literature, and philosophy in a postmodern context.

The philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's Copernican revolution, that is, his assumption that we cannot know . There is no clear distinction, then, between the natural and the artificial in experience.

The philosophical modernism at issue in postmodernism begins with Kant's Copernican revolution, that is, his assumption that we cannot know things in themselves and that objects of knowledge must conform to our faculties of representation (Kant 1787). Ideas such as God, freedom, immortality, the world, first beginning, and final end have only a regulative function for knowledge, since they cannot find fulfilling instances among objects of experience.

Phantom Communities reconsiders the status of the simulacrum―sometimes defined as a copy of a copy, but more rigorously defined as a copy that subverts the legitimacy and authority of its model―in light of recent debates in literature, art, philosophy, and cultural studies. The author pursues two interwoven levels of analysis. On one level, he explores the poetics of the simulacrum, considered as a form that internalizes repetition, through close readings of a number of exemplary literary texts, paintings, and films from both the Anglo-American and French traditions, including works by Jean Genet, Pierre Klossowski, René Magritte, Andy Warhol, J. G. Ballard, Balthus, and Raúl Ruiz. Through his readings of these works, the author follows the transformations of the simulacrum, showing how its vicissitudes provide an optic for remapping the postmodern canon. On another level, the author offers an account of the role played by the simulacrum as a theoretical concept that assumes varying analytical and ideological valences in the writings of such theorists as Jean Baudrillard, Fredric Jameson, Michel Foucault, and Gilles Deleuze. In so doing, Phantom Communities intervenes in ongoing interdisciplinary debates concerning the historical and ideological limits of postmodernism, as well as the utopian possibilities of art, literature, and philosophy in a postmodern context. Moving between these debates and the interpretation of individual works, the author shows how they converge on the fundamental aesthetic and ideological problem raised by the postmodern culture of the simulacrum: imagining the virtual communities that, at the margins of postmodern culture, are at once figured and eclipsed by its proliferating images.