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by Kent C Ryden
Download Sum of the Parts: The Mathematics and Politics of Region, Place, and Writing (American Land & Life) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Kent C Ryden
  • ISBN:
    1587299879
  • ISBN13:
    978-1587299872
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Of Iowa Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1828 kb
  • ePUB format
    1129 kb
  • DJVU format
    1679 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    161
  • Formats:
    lit rtf mbr azw


Sum of the Parts book.

Sum of the Parts book. In this lively new book, writing in the spirit of these understandings, Kent Ryden engagingly examines works of American regional writing to show us how literary partisans of place create and recreate, attack and defend, argue over and dramatize the meaning and identity of their regions in the pages of their books.

Series: American Land & Life. 1 let s meaningful space the mathematics of region and place. Published by: University of Iowa Press. For the past two decades, Kent Ryden has been one of our most engaging writers on the subject of place and identity. His subjects have been both remarkably focused (New England is one anchor of his thought) and wide-ranging. In his first book,Mapping the Invisible Landscape(1993), he took up the question of what constitutes place-in particular, how the humanities can help us understand our experience of place.

Related books: Charles Tomlinson  .

Related books: Charles Tomlinson Sum of the Parts: The Mathematics and Politics of Region, Place, and Writing by Kent C Ryden. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Kent C Ryden. Title: Sum of the Parts: The Mathematics and Politics of Region, Place, and Writing. Help us to make General-Ebooks better!

Ryden, Kent C. Sum of the Parts: The Mathematics and Politics of Region, Place, and Writing. Travis, William R. New Geographies of the American West: Land Use and the Changing 177 Patterns of Place.

Ryden, Kent C. Iowa City: Iowa University Press, 2011.

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Proponents of the new regional history understand that regional identities are constructed and contested, multifarious and not monolithic, that they involve questions of. .

Proponents of the new regional history understand that regional identities are constructed and contested, multifarious and not monolithic, that they involve questions of dominance and power, and that their nature is inherently political.

Mapping the Invisible Landscape: Folklore, Writing, and the Sense of Place (American Land & Life). Download (epub, . 3 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Kent Ryden does not deny that the natural landscape of New England is shaped by many centuries of human . Mapping the Invisible Landscape: Folklore, Writing, and the Sense of Place (American Land and Life Series).

Kent Ryden does not deny that the natural landscape of New England is shaped by many centuries of human manipulation, but he also takes the view that nature i. Recently Viewed and Featured. Works; Including His Posthumous Works.

the mathematics and politics of region, place, and writing. Sets and unsettlement: region, power, and resistance in New England writing. An incompleteness theorem of region: Stegner and the American West. Faulkner and the American South. Published 2011 by University of Iowa Press in Iowa City. Prime real estate: the Midwest, history, and regional identity. Epilogue: null set-ecological regions and cultural regions. Includes bibliographical references (p. 153-159) and index. American land and life series.

In this lively new book, writing in the spirit of these understandings, Kent Ryden engagingly examines works of American regional .

In this lively new book, writing in the spirit of these understandings, Kent Ryden engagingly examines works of American regional writing to show us how literary partisans of place create and recreate, attack and defend, argue over and dramatize the meaning and identity of their regions in the pages of their books. Writing with appealing freshness and a sense of adventure, he shows us that place, and the stories that emerge from and define place, can be a source of subversive energy that blunts the homogenizing force of region, inscribing marginal places and people back onto the imaginative surface of the landscape when we read it on a place-by-place, pe

Proponents of the new regional history understand that regional identities are constructed and contested, multifarious and not monolithic, that they involve questions of dominance and power, and that their nature is inherently political. In this lively new book, writing in the spirit of these understandings, Kent Ryden engagingly examines works of American regional writing to show us how literary partisans of place create and recreate, attack and defend, argue over and dramatize the meaning and identity of their regions in the pages of their books. Cleverly drawing upon mathematical models that complement his ideas and focusing on both classic and contemporary literary regionalists, Ryden demonstrates that regionalism, in the cultural sense, retains a great deal of power as a framework for literary interpretation. For New England he examines such writers as Robert Frost and Hayden Carruth, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and Edith Wharton, and Carolyn Chute and Russell Banks to demonstrate that today’s regionalists inspire closer, more democratic readings of life and landscape. For the West and South, he describes Wallace Stegner’s and William Faulkner’s use of region to, respectively, exclude and evade or confront and indict. For the Midwest, he focuses on C. J. Hribal, William Least Heat-Moon, Paul Gruchow, and others to demonstrate that midwesterners continually construct the past anew from the materials at hand, filling the seemingly empty midlands with history and significance. Ryden reveals that there are many Wests, many New Englands, many Souths, and many Midwests, all raising similar issues about the cultural politics of region and place. Writing with appealing freshness and a sense of adventure, he shows us that place, and the stories that emerge from and define place, can be a source of subversive energy that blunts the homogenizing force of region, inscribing marginal places and people back onto the imaginative surface of the landscape when we read it on a place-by-place, landscape-by-landscape, book-by-book basis.