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by Michal Andrzej Kobialka
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Michal Andrzej Kobialka
  • ISBN:
    0472089382
  • ISBN13:
    978-0472089383
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Michigan Press (July 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    328 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    1809 kb
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    1561 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
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The recipient of the annual Award for Outstanding Book in Theatre Practice and Pedagogy from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education, "This Is My Body" realigns representational practices in the early Middle Ages with current debates on the nature of representation. Kobialka argues that the concept of representation in the early Middle Ages had little to do with the tradition that considers representation in terms of Aristotle or Plato; rather, it was enshrined in the interpretation of 'Hoc est corpus meum' - the words spoken by Christ to the apostles at the Last Supper - and in establishing the visibility of the.

I expect that this book will set high standards for the field of theatre history for decades to come.

Michal Kobialka is Professor in the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance at the University of Minnesota. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. The sovereign good, understood as "enjoyment" in the Middle Ages, undergoes a radical change in the thirteenth century with the reception of the full Latin translation of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.

The backbone of Kobialka’s book is that representation in the early Middle Ages (CE 970-1215) was vastly different than our . The dual existence of. This Is My Body: Representational Practices in the Early Middle Ages 105.

The backbone of Kobialka’s book is that representation in the early Middle Ages (CE 970-1215) was vastly different than our present, traditional understanding of the term as the perspectival relationship between the subject and the object (28). Kobialka claims representation in the Middle Ages to be heterogeneous discursive practice. defined and redefined, disseminated and erased, and institutionalized and internalized within the dynamic field of the ever shifting relationships between theo-logical, historical, metaphysical, social, political and cultural formations (28).

No one even comes close to Early Theatre in terms of communicating with authors. Stephen K. Wright, The Catholic University of America.

According to Kobialka, a representational practice determines what is possible to be thinkable and expressed within a given discursive field (282). As an antidote to the homogeneous notion of representation in the Middle Ages frequently construed by traditional theatre historiography, Kobialka lays bare the power relations and discursive instabilities that underlie a network of such practices in the early Middle Ages (970–1215). Export citation Request permission.

Beckwith, S. Published Date.

Christians experienced the contradiction between the Church that offered salvation in the Eucharist and the Church that through its increasingly large holdings of property in land exploited large numbers of peasants. The resulting dimunition of faith led the clergy to attempt to revitalize it. promising salvation, the ending of the miseries of this life.

This Is My Body: Representational Practices in the Early Middle Ages

This Is My Body: Representational Practices in the Early Middle Ages. The recipient of the annual Award for Outstanding Book in Theatre Practice and Pedagogy from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education, "This Is My Body" realigns representational practices i. More). Tadeusz Kantor's Happenings: Reality, Mediality, and History.

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Kobialka, Michal Andrzej. Fides quaerens intellectum - Chapter 3. Hoc est corpus meum: The Ternary Mode of Presence - Chapter 4. Ecclesia universalis:"This Is My Body - Afterword - Notes - Selected Bibliography - Index

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Ecclesia universalis:"This Is My Body - Afterword - Notes - Selected Bibliography - Index. 520. a Realigns representational practices in the early Middle Ages with current debates on representation. 588. a Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

The recipient of the annual Award for Outstanding Book in Theatre Practice and Pedagogy from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education, This Is My Body realigns representational practices in the early Middle Ages with current debates on the nature of representation. Michal Kobialkai's study views the medieval concept of representation as having been in flux and crossed by different modes of seeing, until it was stabilized by the constitutions of the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215. Kobialka argues that the concept of representation in the early Middle Ages had little to do with the tradition that considers representation in terms of Aristotle or Plato; rather, it was enshrined in the interpretation of Hoc est corpus meum [This is my body] -- the words spoken by Christ to the apostles at the Last Supper -- and in establishing the visibility of the body of Christ that had disappeared from view.Michal Kobialka is Professor in the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance at the University of Minnesota.